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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

ERP Software implementation: An integrative framework

Al-Mudimigh, A.S., Zairi, Mohamed, Al-Mashari, M. January 2001 (has links)
No / ERP implementation is a socio-technical challenge that requires a fundamentally different outlook from technologically-driven innovation, and will depend on a balanced perspective where the organisation as a total system is considered. ERP implementation is considered to rely on behavioural processes and actions. It is a process that involves macro-implementation at the strategic level, and micro-implementation at the operational level. This therefore means that implementation in the context of ERP systems is not possible through an ON/OFF approach whereby deployment of the new systems will necessarily yield the desired and expected results. Understanding the implementation process through a balanced perspective will therefore prevent any unpleasant surprises, and will ensure and guide the change process to be embedded in a painless fashion. The balanced perspective means that socio-technical considerations must be borne in mind; the strategic, tactical and operational steps clearly defined; and the expected benefits evaluated and tracked through creating seamless and solid integration. This paper proposes an integrative framework for ERP implementation based on an extensive review of the factors and the essential elements that contribute to success in the context of ERP implementation.
2

Implementation of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in a Swedish Environment

Åkerblad, Patrik, Johansson, Mikael, Jangvik, Elin January 2007 (has links)
Problem Area: The American company Enron was the seventh largest company notated on the stock market when it went bankrupt due to extensive accounting frauds in December 2001. By manipulating the financial reports, the management of Enron was able to hide huge debts through transactions with external companies. Therefore, they were able to deceive the public by reporting huge profits while the company, in reality, was generating a negative result. As a result of the bankruptcy, 40 billion dollars disappeared and tens of thousands of employees lost their jobs and pension savings. After the Enron scandal, further accounting frauds were discovered in the US, such as WorldCom and Tyco. The WorldCom bankruptcy is, as of today, the largest bankruptcy in the world. Following the scandals and the accounting frauds in a number US companies, the US congress passed a law – the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine how companies in Sweden have managed to implement SOX Sec. 404 – for ensuring internal control. The researchers will examine how different Swedish companies have approached the issue and how they have chosen to implement SOX sec. 404 in their organisation. Have some companies been more effective in their implementation than others and why? Limitations: SOX cover several areas around internal control and reporting. The authors will mainly study Sec. 404, which treats internal control over financial reporting, and is the section that has demanded most effort to comply with. Methodology: The study was conducted by a qualitative research method by conducting personal interviews with respondents from three different companies in Sweden. All of the participating companies in the study are obliged to comply with SOX. Conclusion: The researchers in this study have identified differences in the approach towards SOX-compliance by the participating organisations. The lack of how to implement guidance and the different approaches taken by companies towards SOX compliance may suggest that there is no supreme implementation guide that is suitable for all companies in order to achieve compliance. Proposals for Further Research: As the implementation phase just recently was completed the authors would like to find out how companies are sustaining compliance in the future. Researchers could focus on sustainable compliance as compared to this study where sustainable compliance is merely limited to one section. In addition, it would be interesting to carry out an in-depth study on one company to evaluate their implementation on a deeper level. This would give the researcher a deeper understanding which is more difficult to achieve when conducting a comparative study.
3

The role of teachers' positive attitude toward emotions in implementation of a social-emotional intervention

Buss, Michelle Therese 02 June 2009 (has links)
This study investigates the role of elementary teachers' attitude toward teaching emotions in their implementation of the Promoting Alternative THinking Skills (PATHS) curriculum. The measure of teachers’ attitudes, the Positive Attitude Toward Teaching Emotions (PATE) scale, was developed for this study and was administered to 159 teachers in kindergarten through fourth grades prior to their implementation of the PATHS curriculum. The PATE evidenced adequate internal consistency (.79). To account for the dependency among the observations (teachers) within clusters (grade/school), correlational analyses were conducted using the Cluster feature in Mplus. Teachers’ scores at pre-test on personal and general teaching efficacy predicted PATE scores. PATE scores predicted several indices of teacher implementation of the PATHS program, including observed adherence to the lessons, consultant ratings of teacher engagement in PATHS, and teacher evaluation of PATHS. PATE scores did not predict number of lessons taught or the observed quality of lesson implementation. Findings provide evidence of the construct validity of the PATE and suggest that congruence between teachers’ attitudes and beliefs and the curriculum they are responsible for executing are pivotal components in the eventual success or failure of program implementation.
4

The role of teachers' positive attitude toward emotions in implementation of a social-emotional intervention

Buss, Michelle Therese 02 June 2009 (has links)
This study investigates the role of elementary teachers' attitude toward teaching emotions in their implementation of the Promoting Alternative THinking Skills (PATHS) curriculum. The measure of teachers’ attitudes, the Positive Attitude Toward Teaching Emotions (PATE) scale, was developed for this study and was administered to 159 teachers in kindergarten through fourth grades prior to their implementation of the PATHS curriculum. The PATE evidenced adequate internal consistency (.79). To account for the dependency among the observations (teachers) within clusters (grade/school), correlational analyses were conducted using the Cluster feature in Mplus. Teachers’ scores at pre-test on personal and general teaching efficacy predicted PATE scores. PATE scores predicted several indices of teacher implementation of the PATHS program, including observed adherence to the lessons, consultant ratings of teacher engagement in PATHS, and teacher evaluation of PATHS. PATE scores did not predict number of lessons taught or the observed quality of lesson implementation. Findings provide evidence of the construct validity of the PATE and suggest that congruence between teachers’ attitudes and beliefs and the curriculum they are responsible for executing are pivotal components in the eventual success or failure of program implementation.
5

Implementation of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in a Swedish Environment

Åkerblad, Patrik, Johansson, Mikael, Jangvik, Elin January 2007 (has links)
<p>Problem Area: The American company Enron was the seventh largest company notated on the stock market when it went bankrupt due to extensive accounting frauds in December 2001. By manipulating the financial reports, the management of Enron was able to hide huge debts through transactions with external companies. Therefore, they were able to deceive the public by reporting huge profits while the company, in reality, was generating a negative result. As a result of the bankruptcy, 40 billion dollars disappeared and tens of thousands of employees lost their jobs and pension savings. After the Enron scandal, further accounting frauds were discovered in the US, such as WorldCom and Tyco. The WorldCom bankruptcy is, as of today, the largest bankruptcy in the world. Following the scandals and the accounting frauds in a number US companies, the US congress passed a law – the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX).</p><p>Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine how companies in Sweden have managed to implement SOX Sec. 404 – for ensuring internal control. The researchers will examine how different Swedish companies have approached the issue and how they have chosen to implement SOX sec. 404 in their organisation. Have some companies been more effective in their implementation than others and why? Limitations: SOX cover several areas around internal control and reporting. The authors will mainly study Sec. 404, which treats internal control over financial reporting, and is the section that has demanded most effort to comply with. Methodology: The study was conducted by a qualitative research method by conducting personal interviews with respondents from three different companies in Sweden. All of the participating companies in the study are obliged to comply with SOX. Conclusion: The researchers in this study have identified differences in the approach towards SOX-compliance by the participating organisations. The lack of how to implement guidance and the different approaches taken by companies towards SOX compliance may suggest that there is no supreme implementation guide that is suitable for all companies in order to achieve compliance. Proposals for Further Research: As the implementation phase just recently was completed the authors would like to find out how companies are sustaining compliance in the future. Researchers could focus on sustainable compliance as compared to this study where sustainable compliance is merely limited to one section. In addition, it would be interesting to carry out an in-depth study on one company to evaluate their implementation on a deeper level. This would give the researcher a deeper understanding which is more difficult to achieve when conducting a comparative study.</p>
6

Implementation Workshop: High Performance Work Organizations

Klein, Janice, Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Joel, Barrett, Betty 04 1900 (has links)
A report on findings from the first Lean Aircraft Initiative (LAI) Implementation Workshop held on February 5-6, 1997. The report is not a "cookbook" or a "how to" manual. Rather, it is a summary of the first phase in a learning process. It is designed to codify lessons learned, facilitate diffusion among people not at the session, and set the stage for further learning about implementation. / Lean Aerospace Initiative
7

Ledarskapsaspekter på implementering av evidensbaserad medicin och nationella riktlinjer

Lie, Birgitta January 2012 (has links)
No description available.
8

Entwicklung und Implementierung von Performance-measurement-Systemen /

Schreyer, Maximilian. January 2007 (has links)
Zugl.: Bayreuth, Universiẗat, Diss., 2007.
9

AVID Implementation and Program Fidelity: One District's Case

Sims, Jeanene Evette 27 October 2021 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to examine how four different high schools within one school district implemented the AVID program. The researcher used a comparative case study model to examine the different sites' programs and how the program and program implementation varied by site. The research questions answered how the AVID program was implemented by site, whether the program was implemented with fidelity, and if there were factors that impacted program implementation. The AVID district coordinator, site administrators and site coordinators were surveyed to gauge the understanding of the AVID program, program implementation, and how AVID implementation impacts the program fidelity by site. AVID research suggests that the program works to address the needs of students from underserved populations and aims to help them access advanced academic classes and achieve more success within those college prep courses and school overall. This study may help school districts, school administation and AVID personnel better understand how site implementation impacts overall program success and to see how barriers impact the implemenation process at school sites. Findings included, some school-based administrators and site coordinators did not feel they implemented the AVID program with fidelity, site administrators' involvement with the AVID implementation was inconsistent, most site administrators knew nothing about the specific rating of the AVID Coaching and Certification Instrument (CCI) or the measurement overall. Other findings were AVID site coordinators completed the AVID CCI and coordinated all aspects of the process and AVID implementation at the sites, site coordinators perceived that they implemented the AVID program with the most fidelity possible within their respective "means" but not with fidelity. Further, schools implemented the AVID Domains with varied degrees of fidelity according to the AVID CCI and each site had a unique implementation of the AVID program. / Doctor of Education / Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is an educational program that aims to help underserved students learn how to successfully access classes that helps prepare them for college. The AVID program is offered in some schools to aid students in the academic middle through instruction, tutoring, and structures to learn how to be successful in honors courses within the middle and high school levels. School leaders need to understand how well AVID programs are being implemented within their school to ensure that the program can be the most successful to reach the students well. This research study looked at four AVID schools to see how well they implemented the AVID program in comparison to how it should be done, the role school administration had in the implementation, and how implementation differed at schools. The study used information from the AVID Coaching and Certification Instrument (the AVID report card), to see how the school scored and each AVID site administrator (building principal) and AVID site coordinator (the person who runs the AVID program at the school) were interviewed and asked several questions to better understand the program at each school, the role the site administrator and site coordinator played in running the program and how well the AVID staff understood how well the school did with the program at their school. The study found that schools implemented their programs differently, that the AVID principals did not feel they ran the program as it should be, and that most of the AVID principals did not know what the AVID CCI was or how their school scored. The AVID site coordinator was responsible for running AVID at the school, they ran the AVID program as well as they could but not as it should be.
10

Cashews by SMS : An implementation in Mozambique

Karlsson, Frida, Mansour, Mona January 2008 (has links)
Abstract Title Cashews by SMS – an implementation in Mozambique Problem Innovation is described by Tidd, Bessant and Pavitt (2005) as the core process within organisations associated with renewal and as generic activity associated with survival and growth. Yet many organisations fail to realise the benefits of adopting an innovation. Which the theory will show this is most likely due to a problem with one certain phase in the innovation process: the implementation. Purpose The purpose with this academic paper is by a practical example illustrate the risks and problems one can come across in an implementation and the consequences of this. We also intend to give suggestion on how it is possible to restart an implementation process when the process once has failed. Research questions Why has marketAlerts failed to be implemented in Mozambique? How should IPEX resume the implementation of marketAlerts? Methodology Ethnographical approach. Conclusion Our conclusion is that the Institute for Export Promotion (IPEX) has managed to adopt marketAlerts but has failed to implement it in their daily work mainly due to the fact that they only completed the acquiring phase. The failure is due to a combination of hierarchy, lack of interest and absents of routines for sending marketAlerts. In order for IPEX to make the best use of marketAlerts we believe that they have to go back and start from the executing phase and implement the service once again.

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