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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Teachers' Perceptions of Administrative Leadership Styles and Schools as Professional Learning Communities

Coleman, Clive 20 May 2005 (has links)
This study examined the relationship of principal and assistant principal leadership style in shaping teachers' perceptions of their schools as professional learning communities. The researcher proposed that the traditional distinctions between the classic modes of leadership, namely, transactional and transformational modes of leadership, are difficult to interpret within the framework of professional learning community without considering the interaction of the principal and assistant principal leadership roles. Using Leithwood's (1992, 1993, 1994) definitions of leadership as transformational and management as transactional, empirical evidence from 81 schools is presented that supports the need for both leadership and management skills in the development of a professional learning community. The data also suggest that the principal alone need not be responsible for both. A leadership model for principals and assistant principals with complementary transactional and transformational modes of leadership styles is advanced.
2

IDENTIFYING BUSINESS STUDENTS’ LEADERSHIP STYLES

Borowa, Agnieszka, Darwish, Hani S. January 2007 (has links)
<p>The fact is, no organization has ever become great without exceptional leadership - without leaders who can connect the efforts of their teams to the critical objectives of the organization, who can tap the full potential of each individual on their teams, who can align systems and clarify purposes, and who can inspire trust. The purpose of the study is to investigate and compare what management styles business students from Halmstad University, Sweden, will implement. Moreover, this study shows future leaders work preferences and concerns. As a tool for the findings the managerial grid (founded in 1964 by Blake and Mounton) was incorporated with situational theory (Hersey and Blanchard, 1977). The investigation was conducted applying a theoretical framework to empirical data. By analysing leadership styles and students work preferences, it illustrates the kind of leader a business student will potentially become and which direction he/she may take. Overall, the average of 130 business students from Halmstad University shows that they are going to be a Team Leader, because for them the people’s needs as well as the results of their work are important.</p>
3

IDENTIFYING BUSINESS STUDENTS’ LEADERSHIP STYLES

Borowa, Agnieszka, Darwish, Hani S. January 2007 (has links)
The fact is, no organization has ever become great without exceptional leadership - without leaders who can connect the efforts of their teams to the critical objectives of the organization, who can tap the full potential of each individual on their teams, who can align systems and clarify purposes, and who can inspire trust. The purpose of the study is to investigate and compare what management styles business students from Halmstad University, Sweden, will implement. Moreover, this study shows future leaders work preferences and concerns. As a tool for the findings the managerial grid (founded in 1964 by Blake and Mounton) was incorporated with situational theory (Hersey and Blanchard, 1977). The investigation was conducted applying a theoretical framework to empirical data. By analysing leadership styles and students work preferences, it illustrates the kind of leader a business student will potentially become and which direction he/she may take. Overall, the average of 130 business students from Halmstad University shows that they are going to be a Team Leader, because for them the people’s needs as well as the results of their work are important.
4

Leadership styles of senior librarians in the City of Cape Town

Denton, Theresa Leoni January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
5

Leadership styles of senior librarians in the City of Cape Town

Denton, Theresa Leoni January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
6

Leadership styles of senior librarians in the City of Cape Town

Denton, Theresa Leoni January 2013 (has links)
Magister Bibliothecologiae - MBibl / This study investigated the following: “Leadership styles of senior librarians in the City of Cape Town”. Stueart and Moran (1998) state that despite the vast amount of knowledge, training and focus on management, little is known about how to lead efficiently and effectively. The motivation behind this study originated from the assumption that determining the different leadership styles of senior librarians could contribute to a more effective public library service. If senior librarians were made aware of particular outcomes prompted by certain behaviour, they would be empowered to evaluate their leadership styles and adapt them in a more effective way, which could in turn lead to a more effective public library service. / South Africa
7

A study of the relationship between leadership style and performance - a focus on South African listed and non-listed companies

Matshekga, Lesetsa 06 May 2010 (has links)
The topics of leadership and strategy have attracted considerable interest from both academics and practitioners. Much of the interest in the two areas is based on explicit and implicit claims that both leadership and strategy are linked to organisational performance. This paper examines the nature of the relationship between participative leadership style and performance, and authoritative leadership style and performance. The study hypothesised that authoritative leadership style leads to achievement of the objectives of a strategic plan (hypothesis 1), and that participative leadership style leads to achievement of the objectives of a strategic plan (hypothesis 2). The research was a quantitative study. Data was collected by means of a questionnaire, which was emailed to 200 randomly selected respondents. 48 responses were received. This represents a total response rate of 24%. Of the total 48 responses, 10 were eliminated from the study due to errors. A linear regression method was used to test the hypotheses. The regression analyses have revealed that participative leadership style and performance, and authoritative leadership style and performance are not related. The two variables each explain less than 1% of the variance in performance. As a result, both null hypotheses were not rejected. The paper concludes with a number of implications for future research studies. / Dissertation (MBA)--University of Pretoria, 2010. / Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) / unrestricted
8

A tale of two countries: adapting Chinese leadership styles to a South African context

Zhou, Ying 02 March 2021 (has links)
The status of multinational organisations continues to expand, as global opportunities increase. In particular, Chinese manufacturing companies continue to grow and expand overseas. Given the fact that Chinese Paternalistic Leadership performed by Chinese managers is rooted in Chinese culture, that is different from that practised in other countries of the world. Cross-cultural acumen plays a vital role in leadership success or failure in globalizing organizations. Without cultural adaptation, Chinese managers would be less effective and efficient, when dealing with employees from other cultural backgrounds. Thus, there appears to be a need for the adaptation of Chinese leadership, in order to optimize the outcomes of leadership in the organization in various multicultural settings. This study posits a new research context for Chinese Paternalistic Leadership; and it attempts to explore the question of the leadership-adaptation challenges of Chinese managers, working in a South African Zulu cultural context. The study has used a mixed-methods research approach to collect the data, and for the analysis thereof. Quantitative data were collected by means of surveys from Chinese workers and South African Zulu workers, who were working in Chinese clothing factories – in order to compare their cultural values and perceptions of Chinese leadership behaviours. Qualitative data were collected by semistructured, in-depth interviews with Chinese managers, who were the leaders of Zulu subordinates, in order to investigate their cross-cultural experiences and perspectives. The results from the cultural-values survey data confirmed the distinct differences of cultural dimensions: Power Distance (PDI), Individualism (IDV), Uncertainty Avoidance (UAI), Masculinity (MAS) and Long-Term versus ShortTerm Orientation (LTO) between Chinese and Zulu people. Additionally, no significant difference between the two groups was found on Indulgence versus Restraint (IVR). When compared with Chinese people, the Zulu people hold the characteristics of being low in power distance, collectivism, feminism, high in uncertainty avoidance, short-term orientation, and restraint. On the perceived leadership behaviours scale, the differences between Chinese and Zulu people were shown in all the three dimensions of Chinese leadership behaviours. Compared with Chinese employees, Zulu employees perceived Chinese leadership behaviours as being high on authoritarian leadership behaviour, but low on benevolent and moral leadership behaviour. In addition, it was proved that culture caused different perceptions of authoritarian leadership behaviour in relation to power distance. In interviews, Chinese managers overwhelmingly indicated that the characteristics of Zulu employees were very different from those of Chinese employees. Meanwhile, the Chinese managers confessed that they were confronted with difficulties and challenges in South Africa, including communication barriers, legal constraints, and differences in collective relationships and work ethic. However, they recognised that they were in a different culture, and have identified the need to adjust their leadership behaviours. The participants suggested that they have made progress in establishing relationships, and in improving communication with the Zulu employees. Overall, this study concluded with a discussion of the various strategies for the adaptation of Chinese leadership styles concerning authority/decision-making, relationships and communication in authoritarian leadership styles, benevolent leadership styles, and moral leadership styles respectively. The outcomes of this study are expected to contribute to the theories of Chinese leadership, as well as to Chinese-management practices in South Africa. Nevertheless, future research is recommended, in order to validate the current results, and also to further explore various issues that are beyond the scope of this study.
9

The relationship between culture, manager's leadership styles, and employees' motivation level in a Bahraini service organisation environment

Alnoaimi, Abdulla January 2018 (has links)
The study explored the interrelation between leadership styles, employee motivation, and culture among Bahraini employees and managers in Victory Training Development Institute (VTDI) - a vocational training organization located in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Using a pragmatic case study design, the study employed a mixed method approach to address the research problem. The theoretical framework, which was developed through the guidance of leadership, motivation, and culture theories, posited that cultural constructs may affect the manager's adoption of leadership approaches, as well as the employees' work values. Because Arab culture is characterized by respect for authority, strict enforcement of rules, and tribalistic values and belief, it was expected to affect leadership negatively, as most managers would prefer a traditional passive approach over modern ones. On the contrary, the results of the study revealed that most Bahraini employees apply a combination of transactional and transformational elements in their leadership style, while only few maintains a traditional passive style. Results also showed that Bahraini employees value intrinsic factors more than extrinsic ones. The results also confirmed that a combination of transactional and transformational leadership elements were more effective in motivating employees than a traditional passive laissez-faire approach. Additional findings suggest that cultural factors affect both the manager's leadership style and the employee's perception of leadership effectiveness. A new theoretical framework based on the conceptual framework and the results was presented to explain in details the discovered phenomenon as well as the research's contribution to knowledge.
10

Influence of Leadership Styles on Expatriate Nurses' Professional Integration in the UAE

Ncube, Emmah 01 January 2017 (has links)
Transnational nurse migration has evoked a growing interest in the phenomenon of professional integration of expatriate nurses into their host societies. Despite research connecting employee and organizational outcomes such as job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior to the quality of leadership styles, there remains a lack of research linking professional integration of expatriate nurses to nurse leadership styles in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The purpose of this grounded theory study was to develop a theory that would explain how nurse leadership styles and behaviors impacted the professional integration of expatriate nurses into the multicultural work environment of the UAE. The research questions addressed the perceptions of the expatriate nurses on effective leadership styles and behaviors of nurse leaders in a culturally diverse work environment, the lived experiences of the expatriate nurses, and the impact of the organizational culture on the process of integration. Data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 10 expatriate nurses, demographic surveys, documents review, and researcher memos. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method and initial, focused, axial, and theoretical coding. Results indicated that nurse leadership styles and the conditions surrounding the integration process influenced the success of the expatriate nurses' adaptation, integration, and assimilation into the host society. Implications for social change include the preparation of nurses while in their home country on what to expect in the host country, and development of leadership training programs to prepare nurse leaders for leading in a culturally diverse work environment.

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