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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Conservations with my mother : the daughter-mother relationship and the contemporary woman writer

Wise, Kristyn January 1997 (has links)
No description available.
2

The perception of adolescent girls in Hong Kong on their life situations

Ting, Wai-fong January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
3

A Study of the Relationship Between Parental Attitudes and Illegitimacy

Nichols, Jan 12 1900 (has links)
This study was concerned with the effect of parental attitudes and the illegitimacy rate among teenagers. A survey of the literature discussed many different factors affecting illegitimacy. Theorists have suggested poverty, lack of intelligence, mental abnormalities, and parental attitudes as a few of the causative factors. Also reviewed were areas such as the number of unwed mothers, their intelligence, the effect of the Negro subculture on the illegitimacy rate, the AFDC population and the illegitimate birth rate, and the background of pregnant out of wedlock mothers. The mother-daughter relationship was shown to be of importance in the likelihood of a teenage girl becoming pregnant out of wedlock. It was further suggested that dominance, ignorance, and possessiveness were important in the mother-daughter relationship. Four hypotheses proposed that there would be a significant difference between a group of mothers of teenagers with children born out of wedlock and a group of mothers whose daughters had never been pregnant. The first suggested that mothers of unwed. mothers would rate significantly higher on the possessiveness scale than mothers whose daughters have never been pregnant. The second proposed that mothers of daughters with out of wedlock children would rate significantly higher on the ignoring scale than mothers of never pregnant daughters. The third hypothesis suggested that mothers of unwed mothers would rate significantly higher on the dominance scale than the mother of the girl who has not had a child out of wedlock. The fourth hypothesis proposed that on all three scales the mothers of unwed mothers would rate significantly higher than the mothers of daughters who are not unwed mothers.
4

Auto Biography: A Daughter's Story Told in Cars

Stephenson, Lynda Routledge 20 May 2005 (has links)
Auto Biography is a creative nonfiction memoir: A daughter, forced to move her unlovable, ever-combustible, wheelchairbound mother cross-country in an RV, attempts to come to terms with her via the automobiles of their lives. The story explores: 1) the universal dilemma of caring for aged parents––its stress, its pain, its sacrifice, and its dark humor; 2) memory––the "peeling back" narrative style working in the same layer upon layer way of memory, its non-linearity creating not so much a one-piece narrative but essay snapshots forming a family photo album view of this thing we call memory and this thing we call meaning; and, of course, 3) cars––their subtle yet surprisingly essential role in all our modern and post-modern lives.
5

Mothers and daughters' experiences of breast cancer : family roles, responsibilities, and relationships

Burles, Meridith Clare 22 November 2006
Existing research suggests that illness can have profound implications for the family. The purpose of this thesis is to explore mothers and daughters experiences of the mothers breast cancer in order to determine how their lives were affected by the illness. In particular, I focus on shifts that occurred in their family roles, responsibilities, and relationships. Twelve qualitative interviews were performed with four mother-daughter dyads. Each mother and daughter participated in an initial interview together, as well as a separate follow-up interview. Interview data was analyzed thematically using a blended feminist-interpretive approach. The major themes emerging from the analysis pertained to: shifts in family roles and responsibilities, coping with breast cancer, and growth in family relationships. These themes identify specific aspects of mothers and daughters lives that were affected by breast cancer. Specifically, the findings contribute to the overarching theme that mothers and daughters experienced biographical disruption as a result of the mothers breast cancer, in that the illness required the women to re-assess their everyday lives and expectations for the future. However, the range of experiences described by the mothers and daughters suggest that the degree to which biographical disruption occurred varied depending on the extent to which their lives were altered by breast cancer. Therefore, I conclude that mothers and daughters experienced varying degrees of biographical disruption as a result of the mothers breast cancer. This conclusion indicates that the breast cancer diagnosis has an array of significant implications for mothers and daughters, some of which continue well beyond the completion of acute care. Recognizing that mothers and daughters family roles, responsibilities, and relationships were affected to some extent by the breast cancer experience will help to improve the types of support offered to women in the future.
6

Mothers and daughters' experiences of breast cancer : family roles, responsibilities, and relationships

Burles, Meridith Clare 22 November 2006 (has links)
Existing research suggests that illness can have profound implications for the family. The purpose of this thesis is to explore mothers and daughters experiences of the mothers breast cancer in order to determine how their lives were affected by the illness. In particular, I focus on shifts that occurred in their family roles, responsibilities, and relationships. Twelve qualitative interviews were performed with four mother-daughter dyads. Each mother and daughter participated in an initial interview together, as well as a separate follow-up interview. Interview data was analyzed thematically using a blended feminist-interpretive approach. The major themes emerging from the analysis pertained to: shifts in family roles and responsibilities, coping with breast cancer, and growth in family relationships. These themes identify specific aspects of mothers and daughters lives that were affected by breast cancer. Specifically, the findings contribute to the overarching theme that mothers and daughters experienced biographical disruption as a result of the mothers breast cancer, in that the illness required the women to re-assess their everyday lives and expectations for the future. However, the range of experiences described by the mothers and daughters suggest that the degree to which biographical disruption occurred varied depending on the extent to which their lives were altered by breast cancer. Therefore, I conclude that mothers and daughters experienced varying degrees of biographical disruption as a result of the mothers breast cancer. This conclusion indicates that the breast cancer diagnosis has an array of significant implications for mothers and daughters, some of which continue well beyond the completion of acute care. Recognizing that mothers and daughters family roles, responsibilities, and relationships were affected to some extent by the breast cancer experience will help to improve the types of support offered to women in the future.
7

Mothers and Daughters between Two Cultures in Short Fiction by Edwidge Danticat

Abrahamsson, Kristine January 2011 (has links)
This essay takes a look at two short stories from the novel Krik? Krak! written by the Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat. The short stories “Caroline’s Wedding” and “New York Day Women” are about mother-daughter relationships where the mothers and daughters are either first or second generations immigrants from Haiti. This essay focuses on these relationships and how they are related to immigration. To address these issues of relationships and immigration, several critics and their opinions on the subject are presented as well as an examination of key events in the short stories.
8

Emotional Alchemy: Storytelling in Amy Tan¡¦s The Joy Luck Club and Cristina Garcia¡¦s Dreaming in Cuban

Sun, Chia-chun 08 July 2005 (has links)
Amy Tan¡¦s The Joy Luck Club and Cristina Garcia¡¦s Dreaming in Cuban propose the matrilineal narrative of woman suffering and spiritual growth. Multiple narrators tell personal stories about the past events to cope with their current concerns and coming difficulties. Their storytelling functions as a way of making sense of experiences and fashioning identity. The first chapter explores how the narrative activity enables the del Pino and Joy Luck women to construct a preferred version of personal experiences. They not only tell stories to create idealized self-images but also live their lives to justify the images. Though they portray themselves as capable women in personal stories, they often appear vulnerable and mentally unstable in reality. Such contradiction results from the traumatic events the women leave untold, and they resist telling partly because of their madness and partly because of their repudiation of the events. The second chapter will examine their traumatic experiences to understand how their emotional problems determine the representation of their personal narratives. Due to the early traumatic experiences, the women develop maladaptive schemas to cope with their negative emotions. The schemas, however, undermine their interpersonal relationships and prevent them from fulfilling the basic needs. While wrestling with their emotional problems, they unwittingly transplant schemas into the next generation. The third chapter examines how certain crucial moments in their lives enlighten the women to have awareness of their schemas at the core of their suffering. The death of the family members and serious mother-daughter disagreements provide the opportunity for the women to move beyond the limited way they used to perceive themselves and others. With an open and positive attitude, they relate the traumatic experiences to understand how their early suffering contributes to their present difficulties and outgrow what has troubled them before.
9

Beyond Words: Allegorizing History and Memory in Sara Suleri's Meatless Days

Lin, Ying-chun 26 July 2005 (has links)
This thesis sets out to explore Sara Suleri¡¦s memoir Meatless Days in terms of trauma, memory and writing. The first chapter traces the historical background and Pakistanis¡¦ trauma framed in nostalgia. The second chapter probes into the teaching of Suleri¡¦s mother: the performance, the unplot and the identity, in which I resort to Julia Kristeva¡¦s critique essays to replace Suleri¡¦s mother¡¦s position in Pakistani society since she exists there with ¡§heterogeneous¡¨ cultural and national identity. The third chapter, focusing on Benjamin¡¦s theory on history and memory, deals with Sara Suleri unique writing style. Suleri¡¦s Meatless Days uses her allegorical writing to open herself to the possibilities of silence, introspection, isolation and loneliness in the memoir. Suleri¡¦s writing shares some of the single-minded self-absorption with her mother and has somehow been channeled in to her memorized and lost beloved. The memoir then develops into a story that seems to involve synchronicity, but actually involves our need for synchronicity when synchronicity is simply the way coincidence indulges itself in wish-fulfillment.
10

Side By Side: Reinventing Mother/Daughter Relationships

Holzgraefe, Sandi 05 1900 (has links)
Beginning with mother/daughter film classics such as Stella Dallas (1937) and Mildred Pierce (1945), and moving to consider recent mother/daughter texts, Anywhere But Here (1999) and "Gilmore Girls" (2000 -), this thesis, in both its written and visual components, examines the multiple and often contradictory ways in which mothers and daughters have been represented in popular culture. Challenging the discourses that singularly stress struggle and separation, this research highlights representations that emphasize mother/daughter connection, and examines how such identification empowers mothers and daughters. This project is guided by cultural studies and feminist film theories. The first two chapters outline past and present paradigms of mothers and daughters respectively; the third chapter examines the goals and findings of the visual component.

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