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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Effects of Listener and Context on the Spoken Stories

Ehlers, Courtney 17 June 2008 (has links)
Purpose: This study examined the narratives of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing peers across different listeners and communicative context. Method: Four children, between 8-11 years of age, with diagnoses of ASD (Asperger’s syndrome and PDD-NOS) and average or above average non-verbal cognitive ability were language-age matched with similar chronological age, typically developing peers. Participants were asked to generate narratives from a wordless picture book, story-retell of a short film, and a personal experience. Participants told the three types of narratives to peer- and adult listeners in two separate sessions. Narratives were analyzed for story length, causal statements, internal states, character references, irrelevant information, and examiner prompts. Results: No significant group differences were seen on measures of length, internal states, irrelevant information, or prompts. Compared to their typical peers, children with ASD were less likely to include causal statements in their story retell and wordless picture book narratives told to adult listeners and were more likely to use inaccurate or ambiguous references to characters in personal narratives told to an adult listener. The narratives told across various contexts and listeners by children with ASD were similar on measures of length, internal states, causal statements, use of irrelevant information, and prompts. Children with ASD used proportionally more correct character references in their narratives told to adults compared to their narratives told to children. Conclusions: Compared to typically developing children, children with ASD may exhibit differences in their use of causal statements and references within narratives. Based on the measures analyzed, the narratives of children with ASD were more similar than different across types of listeners and communicative contexts. A follow-up study is needed to investigate the between- and within-group differences on measures of episodic structure and syntactic complexity.
2

"Monsters more than men" interrogating the captivity narrative in a transatlantic context /

Taylor, Jennifer. Moore, Dennis. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Florida State University, 2003. / Advisor: Dr. Dennis Moore, Florida State University, College of Arts and Sciences, Dept. of English. Title and description from dissertation home page (viewed Mar. 4, 2004). Includes bibliographical references.
3

Greek Verbal Aspect in Synoptic Parallels: On the Method and Meaning of Divergent Tense-form Usage in the Synoptic Passion Narratives

Cirafesi, Wally V. January 2012 (has links)
Typical approaches to analyzing the parallel material of the Synoptic Gospels have primarily been concerned with studies in form, source, and redaction criticism. However, these sorts of studies have tended to lack any significant treatment of the fundamental linguistic issues that are relevant to a discussion of Synoptic parallel texts, particularly the issue of divergent tense-form usage. For example, in the temple cleansing episode of Matt 21 :13//Mark ll:17//Luke 19:45, Matthew uses the Present form TTotiiTE (''make'') to recount Jesus' statement to the buyers and sellers, while Mark uses the Perfect TTETTOt~KaTE and Luke the Aorist ETTOt~oaTE to communicate the same event. By employing the insights of Systemic-Functional Linguistics and Stanley E. Porter's model of verbal aspect theory, this work argues that different tense-forms are used in the parallel material of the Synoptic Passion Narratives because each Gospel uses verbal aspect as a means to structure their discourses according to various levels of prominence. / Typical approaches to analyzing the parallel material of the Synoptic Gospels have primarily been concerned with studies in form, source, and redaction criticism. However, these sorts of studies have tended to lack any significant treatment of the fundamental linguistic issues that are relevant to a discussion of Synoptic parallel texts, particularly the issue of divergent tense-form usage. For example, in the temple cleansing episode of Matt 21 :13//Mark ll:17//Luke 19:45, Matthew uses the Present form TTotiiTE (''make'') to recount Jesus' statement to the buyers and sellers, while Mark uses the Perfect TTETTOt~KaTE and Luke the Aorist ETTOt~oaTE to communicate the same event. By employing the insights of Systemic-Functional Linguistics and Stanley E. Porter's model of verbal aspect theory, this work argues that different tense-forms are used in the parallel material of the Synoptic Passion Narratives because each Gospel uses verbal aspect as a means to structure their discourses according to various levels of prominence. / Thesis / Master of Arts (MA)
4

Mapping Mark: Quantitative Study of Clause Thematization as a Means of Illuminating the Gospel Genre

Brown, Nathan L. January 2020 (has links)
This project exhaustively examines the first element (theme) of each clause in Mark and in samples from other roughly contemporaneous Jewish writings. The comparative documents are divided into two categories, referential and non-referential narratives. Then statistical analyses (χ2 and t-test) are used to determine with which category of comparative documents Mark more closely aligns. The raw results of these hypothesis tests were equivocal, but their corresponding effect sizes (Cramer’s Vand Cohen’s d, respectively) clearly demonstrate that Mark more closely resembles referential narrative, although the difference is small. / Thesis / Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
5

'Faraway places and distant horizons' : melodramatic expanses in the writings of Herman Melville and Henry James

Saxon, Theresa January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
6

Measures of narrative performance in Spanish-speaking children on the test of narrative language-Spanish

Perme, Amanda Lee 16 September 2014 (has links)
In the field of speech-language pathology, there is an increasing need for valid and appropriate assessment measures for Spanish-speaking students that can reliably be given by examiners with a wide range of Spanish knowledge and scoring experience. In order to determine the level of detail needed to reliably score a standardized measure of Spanish narrative ability, 15 participants, ranging in Spanish proficiency and experience levels, scored six samples of the experimental version of the Test of Narrative Language-Spanish (TNL-Spanish). Consistency and accuracy of scores were compared with Spanish proficiency levels, comfort levels, and presentation method (written transcript and audio-recorded samples). Results indicated no significant effect for any factor, indicating that examiners of varying levels of Spanish proficiency and experience level can reliably and efficiently score an assessment in Spanish when provided with clear and specific scoring procedures and information regarding the kinds of errors present in language disorders in Spanish. / text
7

Unravelings

McConnell, Megan 12 April 2012 (has links)
My work is a collection of narratives. Each one is the unfolding of the story of a person or thing. Several pieces are made up of objects that tell the story of their owners, giving clues to their lifestyles and experiences. I am interested in the story behind the things and people that I come across on a daily basis. For instance, what was housed in the drawers of the dresser I found in a thrift shop? Who drank from the milk bottle I now use as a vase? If I see a discarded toy on the street, I wonder what events led up to its abandonment. The way in which all of the represented objects and people are linked is left ambiguous, so that the viewer can create their own narrative. The more abstracted pieces are close-ups of objects. These pieces document the wearing away or fraying of something, telling many stories over several years, possibly portraying a wall that has been painted over many times, causing it to flake, or a shirt that has been worn to the point of disrepair.
8

Ethnography of Unitarian Universalism

Unknown Date (has links)
Unitarian Universalism is a modern religion with a long history of reformation rooted in Christianity. My ethnography examines one of the Unitarian Universalist fellowships located in South Florida. The research examines the role of the church in American lives and the significance of the religious experience among liberals and humanists. American religions have been the focus of social scientists for the past forty years. This study shed light on how modernity affects the trajectory of religion in the United States. This is a holistic approach viewed of one of the American religions through a socio economic and political lens. Unitarian Universalism is comprehended through themes of individual narratives. Unitarian Universalist narratives present the religious experience a heterogeneous group might share. The story of Unitarian Universalists explains how religion is attached socially and culturally to believers. My research offers an alternative narrative for people who represent a minority among traditional and world religions. / Includes bibliography. / Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2019. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
9

The Seven Ages of Susanna: Immersing in the Narrative Through Augmented Reality

Unknown Date (has links)
The story is a sequence of events. Since nomadic times we have been drawn to the process of storytelling and the underlying themes hidden within these plots. Now, as the technological advancements made in new media lead us to this point, there is the need to reconcile the connection of the narrative with that of new media. Many theorists such as Manovich believe the narrative is slowly dying as new media continues to evolve. While others such as Bolter and Grusin think the story and traditional media is merely reinserting itself into new media. In the augmented reality story, The Seven Ages of Susanna, I seek to create a marriage of conventional media narrative and illustration techniques. By using new media tools of Vuforia and Unity, I aim to create an immersive experience that reconciles this issue. / Includes bibliography. / Thesis (M.F.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2019. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
10

Where We Belong: A Memoir

Merrill, Mark Reed 24 April 2012 (has links)
Where We Belong is more than a memoir. It is a love story about the untimely death of the oldest of five daughters born to a prominent New Haven, Connecticut family. It is also a tale of hubris, rage and frustration, a Greek tragedy about a man's life as re-examined through the lens of the two weeks his wife spent dying, a tale in which chronic illness and good intentions ensure the death of a loving wife, artist and mother. The journey on which her husband takes the reader explores a health care system oblivious to her plight, her family's unwitting complicity and a 12-step mythology that unfolds while he, her six weeping children and her aging mother helplessly look on. The author endures an agony that dwarfs incentives to lie, learning that people lie out of fear, and genuine grief supplants fear with the stark reality of what we fear most: death. Where We Belong gives voice to the internal dialogue the author encounters when reexamining not just memories, but the accoutrements of memory, as well. It is a voice that addresses his own grandiosity, sentimentalism and self-pity in the face of his wife's death, in addition to those details, circumstances and impressions that speak to the arrogance he brought to the task of being all he thought she and her six children needed him to be. He concludes the task was well beyond him, a realization evoked by the gut wrenching decision to literally "pull the plug" on this heartbreaking tale of reconstituted hope and great promise reduced to rubble by chronic illness, alcoholism, drug addiction and death. Born is the lesson that when we grieve, we are free to be ourselves. When we are free to be ourselves, we are free to love again.

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