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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Fairness-Aware Uplink Packet Scheduling Based on User Reciprocity for Long Term Evolution

Wu, Hsuan-Cheng 03 August 2011 (has links)
none
2

Concurrent Implementation of Packet Processing Algorithms on Network Processors

Groves, Mark January 2006 (has links)
Network Processor Units (NPUs) are a compromise between software-based and hardwired packet processing solutions. While slower than hardwired solutions, NPUs have the flexibility of software-based solutions, allowing them to adapt faster to changes in network protocols. <br /><br /> Network processors have multiple processing engines so that multiple packets can be processed simultaneously within the NPU. In addition, each of these processing engines is multi-threaded, with special hardware support built in to alleviate some of the cost of concurrency. This hardware design allows the NPU to handle multiple packets concurrently, so that while one thread is waiting for a memory access to complete, another thread can be processing a different packet. By handling several packets simultaneously, an NPU can achieve similar processing power as traditional packet processing hardware, but with greater flexibility. <br /><br /> The flexibility of network processors is also one of the disadvantages associated with them. Programming a network processor requires an in-depth understanding of the hardware as well as a solid foundation in concurrent design and programming. This thesis explores the challenges of programming a network processor, the Intel IXP2400, using a single-threaded packet scheduling algorithm as a sample case. The algorithm used is a GPS approximation scheduler with constant time execution. The thesis examines the process of implementing the algorithm in a multi-threaded environment, and discusses the scalability and load-balancing aspects of such an algorithm. In addition, optimizations are made to the scheduler implementation to improve the potential concurrency. The synchronization primitives available on the network processor are also examined, as they play a significant part in minimizing the overhead required to synchronize memory accesses by the algorithm.
3

Concurrent Implementation of Packet Processing Algorithms on Network Processors

Groves, Mark January 2006 (has links)
Network Processor Units (NPUs) are a compromise between software-based and hardwired packet processing solutions. While slower than hardwired solutions, NPUs have the flexibility of software-based solutions, allowing them to adapt faster to changes in network protocols. <br /><br /> Network processors have multiple processing engines so that multiple packets can be processed simultaneously within the NPU. In addition, each of these processing engines is multi-threaded, with special hardware support built in to alleviate some of the cost of concurrency. This hardware design allows the NPU to handle multiple packets concurrently, so that while one thread is waiting for a memory access to complete, another thread can be processing a different packet. By handling several packets simultaneously, an NPU can achieve similar processing power as traditional packet processing hardware, but with greater flexibility. <br /><br /> The flexibility of network processors is also one of the disadvantages associated with them. Programming a network processor requires an in-depth understanding of the hardware as well as a solid foundation in concurrent design and programming. This thesis explores the challenges of programming a network processor, the Intel IXP2400, using a single-threaded packet scheduling algorithm as a sample case. The algorithm used is a GPS approximation scheduler with constant time execution. The thesis examines the process of implementing the algorithm in a multi-threaded environment, and discusses the scalability and load-balancing aspects of such an algorithm. In addition, optimizations are made to the scheduler implementation to improve the potential concurrency. The synchronization primitives available on the network processor are also examined, as they play a significant part in minimizing the overhead required to synchronize memory accesses by the algorithm.
4

A Pre-Scheduling Mechanism for LTE Handover

Su, Wei-Ming 19 July 2012 (has links)
none
5

Implementation of Dynamic Queuing Scheduler for DiffServ Networks on Linux Platform

Wu, Wei-Cheng 10 July 2002 (has links)
Existing edge and core routers in DiffServ networks require an effective scheduling mechanism. In this thesis, we design and implement a DiffServ scheduler on Linux platform to provide QoS for different PHB requirements. We first modify the PDD model proposed by Dovrolis, and then develop two new scheduling algorithms. The first algorithm is referred to as Priority Queue with Quantum (PQWQ) and the second one is referred to as Average Delay Queue (ADQ). PQWQ can provide lower delay for EF traffic than Deficit Round Robin (DRR), and higher network utilization than Priority Queue (PQ) with EF Token Bucket. In addition, PQWQ can guarantee a minimum bandwidth for AF and Default PHBs and avoid starvation in case of low priority PHBs. The second scheduler, ADQ, is designed to provide different levels of delay for AF classes. The average delays of the four AF classes can be proportional by adjusting the Delay Differentiation Parameter (DDP). This proportional scheme may allow the higher priority class to send packets more quickly, and therefore achieve higher QoS. Finally, we implement the two schedulers, PQWQ and ADQ, on Linux platform. We adopt share buffer scheme for AF PHB. Share buffer management can effectively improve the buffer utilization and avoid the unnecessary packet dropping due to the unfair buffer allocation. From the experimental results, we can observe that the new DiffServ schedulers not only provide lower delay and higher bandwidth utilization for EF PHB, but also achieve proportional delay among different AF classes.
6

A Jitter Minimization Mechanism with Credit/Deficit Adjustment in IPv6-Based DiffServ Networks

Shiu, Yi-Min 13 August 2003 (has links)
In a DiffServ networks, edge and core router classify traffic flows into different PHBs and provide different QoS for the classified flows. In order to achieve satisfactory QoS guarantee, many packet schedulers were proposed. However IETF have not formally standardized an appropriate and effective packet scheduler to minimize the jitter for real-time traffic. In RFC, EF flows are characterized with low-latency, low packet loss rate, and low jitter. Therefore, real-time traffic is often classified into EF flow. By considering the characteristics of real-time traffic, it is not appropriate to forward packets either too fast or too slow. Hence, in this Thesis, we propose a mechanism in which each packet is attached with its own per-hop queuing delay. If a packet is forwarded within its own per-hop queuing delay, we say the packet may arrive too early (credit accumulation). If a packet is forwarded beyond its own per-hop queuing delay, we say the packet has late arrival (deficit accumulation). The Credit/Deficit information can be stored in the IPv6 optional header so that it can pass through the whole networks. If we can minimize the Credit/Deficit, the jitter can be minimized too. Our design is based on a modified WFQ by adding functions such as estimated queuing delay and dynamic class changes. The dynamic class changes allow EF packets to switch among queues to achieve lower jitter and constant delay. We first implement the traditional WFQ scheduler on Linux platform and then followed by the implementation of the Credit/Deficit WFQ (CDWFQ). The experimental results have shown that CDWFQ can provide nearly constant queuing delay, lower packet loss rate, and lower jitter for EF traffic flows.
7

Evaluation of Incentive-compatible Differentiated Scheduling for Packet-switched Networks

Lin, Yunfeng January 2005 (has links)
Communication applications have diverse network service requirements. For instance, <em>Voice over IP</em> (VoIP) demands short end-to-end delay, whereas <em>File Transfer Protocol</em> (FTP) benefits more from high throughput than short delay. However, the Internet delivers a uniform best-effort service. As a result, much research has been conducted to enhance the Internet to provide service differentiation. Most of the existing proposals require additional access-control mechanisms, such as admission control and pricing, which are complicated to implement and render these proposals not incrementally deployable. <em>Incentive-compatible Differentiated Scheduling</em> (ICDS) provides incentives for applications to choose a service class according to their burst characteristics without additional access-control mechanisms. <br /><br /> This thesis investigates the behaviour of ICDS with different types of traffic by analysis and extensive simulations. The results show some evidences that ICDS can achieve its design goal. In addition, this thesis revises the initial ICDS algorithm to provide fast convergence for TCP traffic.
8

Evaluation of Incentive-compatible Differentiated Scheduling for Packet-switched Networks

Lin, Yunfeng January 2005 (has links)
Communication applications have diverse network service requirements. For instance, <em>Voice over IP</em> (VoIP) demands short end-to-end delay, whereas <em>File Transfer Protocol</em> (FTP) benefits more from high throughput than short delay. However, the Internet delivers a uniform best-effort service. As a result, much research has been conducted to enhance the Internet to provide service differentiation. Most of the existing proposals require additional access-control mechanisms, such as admission control and pricing, which are complicated to implement and render these proposals not incrementally deployable. <em>Incentive-compatible Differentiated Scheduling</em> (ICDS) provides incentives for applications to choose a service class according to their burst characteristics without additional access-control mechanisms. <br /><br /> This thesis investigates the behaviour of ICDS with different types of traffic by analysis and extensive simulations. The results show some evidences that ICDS can achieve its design goal. In addition, this thesis revises the initial ICDS algorithm to provide fast convergence for TCP traffic.
9

Soft Real-Time Switched Ethernet: Best-Effort Packet Scheduling Algorithm, Implementation, and Feasibility Analysis

Wang, Jinggang 10 October 2002 (has links)
In this thesis, we present a MAC-layer packet scheduling algorithm, called Best-effort Packet Scheduling Algorithm(BPA), for real-time switched Ethernet networks. BPA considers a message model where application messages have trans-node timeliness requirements that are specified using Jensen's benefit functions. The algorithm seeks to maximize aggregate message benefit by allowing message packets to inherit benefit functions of their parent messages and scheduling packets to maximize aggregate packet-level benefit. Since the packet scheduling problem is NP-hard, BPA heuristically computes schedules with a worst-case cost of O(n^2), faster than the O(n^3) cost of the best known Chen and Muhlethaler's Algorithm(CMA) for the same problem. Our simulation studies show that BPA performs the same or significantly better than CMA. We also construct a real-time switched Ethernet by prototyping an Ethernet switch using a Personal Computer(PC) and implementing BPA in the network protocol stack of the Linux kernel for packet scheduling. Our actual performance measurements of BPA using the network implementation reveal the effectiveness of the algorithm. Finally, we derive timeliness feasibility conditions of real-time switched Ethernet systems that use the BPA algorithm. The feasibility conditions allow real-time distributed systems to be constructed using BPA, with guaranteed soft timeliness. / Master of Science
10

An Integrated Framework for Wireless Sensor Network Management

Karim, Lutful 19 June 2012 (has links)
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have significant potential in many application domains, and are poised for growth in many markets ranging from agriculture and animal welfare to home and office automation. Although sensor network deployments have only begun to appear, the industry still awaits the maturing of this technology to realize its full benefits. The main constraints to large scale commercial adoption of sensor networks are the lack of available network management and control tools for determining the degree of data aggregation prior to transforming it into useful information, localizing the sensors accurately so that timely emergency actions can be taken at exact location, and scheduling data packets so that data are sent based on their priority and fairness. Moreover, due to the limited communication range of sensors, a large geographical area cannot be covered, which limits sensors application domain. Thus, we investigate a scalable and flexible WSN architecture that relies on multi-modal nodes equipped with IEEE 802.15.4 and IEEE 802.11 in order to use a Wi-Fi overlay as a seamless gateway to the Internet through WiMAX networks. We focus on network management approaches such as sensors localization, data scheduling, routing, and data aggregation for the WSN plane of this large scale multimodal network architecture and find that most existing approaches are not scalable, energy efficient, and fault tolerant. Thus, we introduce an efficient approach for each of localization, data scheduling, routing, and data aggregation; and compare the performance of proposed approaches with existing ones in terms of network energy consumptions, localization error, end-to-end data transmission delay and packet delivery ratio. Simulation results, theoretical and statistical analysis show that each of these approaches outperforms the existing approaches. To the best of our knowledge, no integrated network management solution comprising efficient localization, data scheduling, routing, and data aggregation approaches exists in the literature for a large scale WSN. Hence, we e±ciently integrate all network management components so that it can be used as a single network management solution for a large scale WSN, perform experimentations to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework, and validate the results through statistical analysis. Experimental results show that our proposed framework outperforms existing approaches in terms of localization energy consumptions, localization accuracy, network energy consumptions and end-to-end data transmission delay.

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