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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A comparative analysis of anti-corruption legislation and anti-corruption agencies in the Eastern Cape and Northern Cape provices : a governance perspective

Majila, Victoria Thozama January 2012 (has links)
This thesis analysed and compared the effectiveness of the anti-corruption legislation and anti-corruption agencies in the Eastern Cape and Northern Cape provinces. The thesis consists of six chapters. This study is based on the assumption that the struggle against corruption is best approached by developing a system of laws, institutions and supporting practices which promote integrity and make corrupt conduct a high-risk activity. It is imperative that a systemic approach is embarked upon in order to address the manner in which the major institutions and processes of the state are conquered and exploited by corrupt individuals and groups. With the magnitude in which hurdles exist that hamper the effectiveness of the country's anti-corruption legislation and anti-corruption agencies; South Africa is incapable of curbing corruption. With the purpose to determine a desired state of affairs, characteristics of effective anti-corruption agencies and anti-corruption legislation were presented. These served as a yardstick in measuring how effective such agencies and legislation are in South Africa. Reasons for failure of agencies and legislation are discussed. After discussing types of anti-corruption agencies, those that perform better than ix others were identified. Through literature review, the status quo concerning anti-corruption initiatives in South Africa was assessed. It was revealed that the level of the success of South African anti-corruption agencies and legislation has been limited. In the case of anti-corruption agencies, weaknesses such as fragmentation; insufficient coordination; poor delineation of responsibility; and assimilation of corruption work into a broader mandate were identified as major causes. Measures that are needed, such as informed citizens; a need to foster and sustain high levels of professional and ethically imbued civil servants; and legislation that supports the transition towards a corruption-free society that are needed to complement implementation of anti-corruption legislation, were also recognised. Ways of addressing such shortcomings that the writers identified are also presented. The methodology and design followed in the study are described. This is followed by the analysis and interpretation of the survey. The research findings are then presented. Based on the findings a number of recommendations that would assist in improving the effectiveness of anticorruption agencies and anti-corruption legislation are made. Flowing from the discussion of effective anti-corruption models that were identified by literature a model that would be ideal for South Africa is recommended.
2

Fighting corruption in the South African public sector with special reference to costs and impact

Balia, Daryl M. 28 February 2005 (has links)
Corruption, understood as the misuse of public office for private gain, has become a matter of global concern. Numerous measures being taken, not least in South Africa, to contain its spread are increasingly regarded as attempts in "fighting corruption". The South African public sector provides the context for this study where manifestations of corrupt behaviour may be observed and analysed. Particular attention is given to the role, relevance and costs which, as this study shows, must first be calculated in monetary terms as a fiscal end in order for the task of fighting corruption to produce a sustainable impact. The national strategy developed by the South African government has been compromised by the absence of sufficient resources being committed from the national fiscus for its implementation. It is misleading to assume that new laws and tighter regulations will of themselves serve to deter corrupt practices. One notices a plethora of public administration reforms being initiated to control and prevent corruption in line with international best practice. Yet, as this study concludes, such efforts even at higher fiscal cost will not necessarily contribute to reduced corruption. No attempt should be made to create a situation of a "zero tolerance" level of corruption as this is not possible. Ultimately, the challenge for the South African public sector is to seek ways of rationalising existing resources such that a single agency led by someone with moral authority can be vested with powers to lead the fight against corruption. / Public Administration / (D. Litt. et Phil. (Public Administration)
3

Fighting corruption in the South African public sector with special reference to costs and impact

Balia, Daryl M. 28 February 2005 (has links)
Corruption, understood as the misuse of public office for private gain, has become a matter of global concern. Numerous measures being taken, not least in South Africa, to contain its spread are increasingly regarded as attempts in "fighting corruption". The South African public sector provides the context for this study where manifestations of corrupt behaviour may be observed and analysed. Particular attention is given to the role, relevance and costs which, as this study shows, must first be calculated in monetary terms as a fiscal end in order for the task of fighting corruption to produce a sustainable impact. The national strategy developed by the South African government has been compromised by the absence of sufficient resources being committed from the national fiscus for its implementation. It is misleading to assume that new laws and tighter regulations will of themselves serve to deter corrupt practices. One notices a plethora of public administration reforms being initiated to control and prevent corruption in line with international best practice. Yet, as this study concludes, such efforts even at higher fiscal cost will not necessarily contribute to reduced corruption. No attempt should be made to create a situation of a "zero tolerance" level of corruption as this is not possible. Ultimately, the challenge for the South African public sector is to seek ways of rationalising existing resources such that a single agency led by someone with moral authority can be vested with powers to lead the fight against corruption. / Public Administration and Management / (D. Litt. et Phil. (Public Administration)
4

Comparing anti-corruption strategies in South Africa's Western and Eastern Cape Provinces.

Cwati, Sizathu Tosca January 2004 (has links)
In its new democracy, South Africa is busy making endeavours to transform and correct the wrongs and problems of the past. In the process it is vital that obstacles to development such as corruption in the public sector should be uprooted as they inhibit quality service delivery and further damage the name of the public service.<br /> <br /> This study compares anti-corruption strategies in South Africa&rsquo / s Western and Eastern Cape provinces, in particular by looking at both the achievements and limitations that have been experienced. The focus area is the provincial administrations in both provinces. In order to contextualise the evaluation of the anti-corruption strategies pursued by the two provincial administrations, the study also includes an examination of the role of provinces in general in combating corruption.<br /> <br /> The research methods employed include a detailed survey of documentation published by the provincial governments&rsquo / anti-corruption agencies, as well as reports by civil society organizations focusing on corruption in the public sector. The study also draws on semi-structured interviews conducted with key stakeholders in the two provinces.<br /> <br /> The study concludes by summarizing the successes and limitations of the two provincial administrations in dealing with corruption. A number of practical recommendations are provided to strengthen the future design and implementation of anti-corruption strategies.<br /> The empirical research for this research report was carried out in 2003 before the national and provincial elections of 2004.
5

Comparing anti-corruption strategies in South Africa's Western and Eastern Cape Provinces.

Cwati, Sizathu Tosca January 2004 (has links)
In its new democracy, South Africa is busy making endeavours to transform and correct the wrongs and problems of the past. In the process it is vital that obstacles to development such as corruption in the public sector should be uprooted as they inhibit quality service delivery and further damage the name of the public service.<br /> <br /> This study compares anti-corruption strategies in South Africa&rsquo / s Western and Eastern Cape provinces, in particular by looking at both the achievements and limitations that have been experienced. The focus area is the provincial administrations in both provinces. In order to contextualise the evaluation of the anti-corruption strategies pursued by the two provincial administrations, the study also includes an examination of the role of provinces in general in combating corruption.<br /> <br /> The research methods employed include a detailed survey of documentation published by the provincial governments&rsquo / anti-corruption agencies, as well as reports by civil society organizations focusing on corruption in the public sector. The study also draws on semi-structured interviews conducted with key stakeholders in the two provinces.<br /> <br /> The study concludes by summarizing the successes and limitations of the two provincial administrations in dealing with corruption. A number of practical recommendations are provided to strengthen the future design and implementation of anti-corruption strategies.<br /> The empirical research for this research report was carried out in 2003 before the national and provincial elections of 2004.
6

Governance challenges in combating supply chain management corruption in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Legodi, Lesetja Freddy January 2017 (has links)
Research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Management in Public Policy in the Faculty of Commerce, Law, and Management at the University of Witwatersrand Degree of Confidentiality: A Date: March 2017 / This dissertation is set out to investigate corruption-related challenges within the procurement and Supply Chain Management practices in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality that hinder good practices and the promotion of good governance and offers insight on how those challenges could be addressed. A research design adopted is descriptive case study through a qualitative method approach which was influenced by the nature of the research problems understudy, in order to uncover trends in thought and opinions, and dive deeper into the problem, using in-depth interviews. The findings of the study or the identified challenges that are associated with procurement and SCM processes in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality are a lack of capacity (skilled), inconsistent Bid Committee processes, lack of appraisal systems, ineffective technologically advanced SCM systems (E-procurement), lack of SCM monitoring tools, and lack of training programs for personnel. The study was meant to investigate corruption-related challenges within the procurement and Supply Chain Management practices in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality that hinder good practices and the promotion of good governance, with the focus being on issues of accountability, rule of law, ethics and integrity, and transparency as principles of good governance and elements of anti-corruption measures in curbing corruption. The findings highlight the challenges that are likely to hinder good governance; and with a clear bigger picture of what the challenges are, then that would pave a way for what could to be done, especially in the procurement and Supply Chain Management Unit of the Municipality to abate corruption-related activities. / MT2017
7

Anti-corruption strategies in the South African public sector : perspectives on the contributions of complexity thinking and ICTs / Political corruption -- South Africa

Habtemichael, Faniel Sahle 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (PhD (School of Public Management and Planning ))—University of Stellenbosch, 2009. / Among the multitude of problems that contemporary South Africa is faced with, is corruption. Corruption in contemporary South Africa has spread to a systemic level, as evidenced through national and international research, official government statements, and the media. The leakage of billions of Rand from government coffers to greedy individuals is alarming. Allegations of corruption are increasingly implicating top government and party officials. Some of government payrolls are invaded by ghost workers; government accounts are charged by over- and under-invoicing, phantom billing and ghost beneficiaries. Resources are diverted and leaked in the process of supply chain activities. Against these, ICTs are not well placed, despite their capabilities to counter administrative corruption. The dissertation focuses on exploring the answers to the following questions in the South African public sector. i. What is corruption and why is it still increasing, despite the availability of ICTs that can effectively assist in tracking and tracing irregularities in the financial system? ii. How sufficiently and effectively are ICTs designed to minimise susceptibility to corruption in financial transactions, HR issues, and the activities (elements) of the supply chain? iii. How cohesive and integrated are the sub-systems and systems in the anticorruption industry (organisationally, nationally and internationally) in order to close the loopholes for corruption? iv. Is there a nationally centralised database system that is used as a frame of reference in administrative decision making? v. What general problems are there in the anti-corruption system? 6 In the effort to move from the conceptual to the empirical level, these problems provide the main stimulus for exploring the status and role of information technologies in the anti-corruption system.
8

An exploration of whistle blowing in fighting corruption in the public sector in South Africa : A case of Stellenbosch Municipality

Chamunorwa, Joan Chiedza 04 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MComm)--Stellenbosch University, 2015. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Corruption in South Africa has become a topical issue, especially in the public sector. Public officials are expected to uphold the public interest, but corrupt officials abuse public office for personal gain. Corruption has many forms and facets and it occurs on both large and petty scales. Despite the scale, corruption has negative consequences, such as the loss of public confidence, the undermining of efficiency in service delivery and the diversion of resources. The reporting of corruption through whistle blowing is important because it alerts the organisation of corrupt activities that have been witnessed. However, even though whistle blowers disclose corrupt activities which are detrimental to the public interest, they often experience retaliation, for example harassment, victimization and threats. Whistle blowers are thus often reluctant to blow the whistle. The South African government has enacted legislation, in particular the Protected Disclosures Act (2000), which protects whistle blowers from retaliation; however, in itself this may not be sufficient to encourage employees to blow the whistle. Organisations therefore need to devise effective whistle blowing mechanisms and create a culture of transparency that encourages employees to blow the whistle In light of the above, this study focuses on employee perceptions of whistle blowing mechanisms within Stellenbosch Municipality as a case study, with the primary objective of ascertaining the importance of whistle blowing in curbing corruption in the public sector. The study also investigates the extent to which employees are well informed on whistle blowing legislation and other mechanisms. Additionally the study focuses on the challenges and the consequences that whistle blowers face when they expose corruption. A literature review was also conducted to explore the conceptualisation of whistle blowing, corruption and anti-corruption strategies. From the literature review, it became evident that there is a need for the effective management and application of whistle blowing mechanisms to effectively curb corruption. The research design used was methodological triangulation; this consisted of a quantitative research method, namely a structured questionnaire, as well as a qualitative research method, namely semi-structured interviews. The different methods were used because they allowed for a more comprehensive approach to the study. Ninety-eight respondents, who are employees of Stellenbosch Municipality, participated in the study by completing the questionnaire. The results of the study indicate that the majority of respondents view the term whistle blowing negatively which might contribute to why individuals are reluctant to blow the whistle. Furthermore, employees agreed unanimously that they lacked confidence in their manager/supervisors to deal with disclosures of corruption. Based on the findings of this study, Stellenbosch Municipality is commended for its efforts in developing a Fraud and Corruption Policy and establishing a Fraud Hotline. However, there should be enhanced protection of whistle blowers at the Municipality in order to encourage employees to blow the whistle on any corruption that they witness in the organisation. The study contributes to anti-corruption research, and in particular whistle blowing mechanisms within the public sector in South Africa. / AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Korrupsie in Suid-Afrika is 'n aktuele kwessie, veral in die openbare sektor. Van staatsamptenare word verwag om openbare belang te prioritiseer, maar korrupte amptenare misbruik hul staatsamp vir persoonlike gewin. Korrupsie het baie vorme en fasette en kom voor op groot en klein skaal. Ongeag die skaal het korrupsie negatiewe gevolge, soos die verlies van vertroue deur die publiek, die ondermyning van doeltreffendheid in dienslewering en die misbruik van hulpbronne. Die aanmelding van korrupsie deur die fluitjie te blaas is van groot belang omdat dit organisasies inlig oor korrupte aktiwiteite wat opgemerk word. Selfs al word korrupte aktiwiteite, wat nadelig is vir die openbare belang, aangemeld deur fluitjieblasers, ervaar hulle dikwels vergelding deur die beweerde partye, byvoorbeeld teistering, viktimisering en dreigemente. Fluitjieblasers is dus dikwels huiwerig om die fluitjie te blaas. Die Suid-Afrikaanse regering het wetgewing uitgevaardig, veral die Wet op Openbare Bekendmakings (2000), wat fluitjieblasers teen weerwraak beskerm; hierdie wetgewing alleen mag egter nie voldoende wees om werknemers aan te moedig om die fluitjie te blaas nie. Organisasies moet dus effektiewe fluitjieblaas meganismes ontwikkel en 'n kultuur van deursigtigheid skep wat werknemers sou aanmoedig om die fluitjie te blaas. In die lig van bogenoemde, fokus hierdie studie op werknemer persepsies van fluitjie-blaas binne die Stellenbosch Munisipaliteit as 'n gevallestudie, met die oorhoofse doel om die belangrikheid van fluitjie-blaas as meganisme om korrupsie in die openbare sektor te bekamp, vas te stel. Die studie ondersoek ook tot watter mate werknemers ingelig is oor fluitjieblaas wetgewing en ander meganismes. Daarbenewens fokus die studie op die uitdagings en die gevolge wat fluitjieblasers in die gesig staar wanneer hulle korrupsie ontbloot. 'n Literatuurstudie is ook gedoen ten einde die konseptualisering van fluitjie blaas, korrupsie en anti-korrupsie strategieë te verken. Uit die literatuuroorsig, het dit duidelik geword dat daar 'n behoefte is aan doeltreffende bestuur en toepassing van fluitjie blaas meganismes om korrupsie teen te werk. Metodologiese triangulasie is as navorsingontwerp gebruik; dit bestaan uit 'n kwantitatiewe navorsingsmetode, naamlik 'n gestruktureerde vraelys, sowel as 'n kwalitatiewe navorsingsmetode, naamlik semi-gestruktureerde onderhoude. Die verskillende metodes is toegepas aangesien dit lei tot 'n meer omvattende benadering tot die studie. Agt en negentig persone, in diens van Stellenbosch Munisipaliteit, het aan die studie deelgeneem deur die vraelys te voltooi. Die resultate van die studie dui daarop dat die meerderheid van die respondente die term “fluitjie blaas” as negatief beskou, wat kan bydra tot ‘n huiwering deur indiwidue om wel die fluitjie te blaas. Verder dui die resultate eenvormig daarop dat werknemers nie vertroue het in hul bestuurder / toesighouers om die openbaarmaking van korrupsie te hanteer nie. Gebaseer op die bevindinge van hierdie studie, word die Stellenbosch Munisipaliteit geprys vir sy pogings met die ontwikkeling van 'n bedrog en korrupsie beleid en die vestiging van 'n bedrogblitslyn. Beskerming van fluitjieblasers by die Munisipaliteit moet egter verbeter word om sodoende werknemers aan te moedig om die fluitjie te blaas oor enige korrupsie wat opgemerk word in die organisasie. Die studie dra by tot anti-korrupsie navorsing, en in besonders, fluitjie-blaas meganismes binne die openbare sektor in Suid-Afrika.
9

Tenders and corruption in post-apartheid South Africa : rethinking African ethics as a panacea for corruption.

Zondi, Samson Nelson Thembinkosi. 25 June 2013 (has links)
The African National Congress inherited a country with high levels of unemployment, deepening poverty and inequalities. These socio-economic challenges were the result of the previous apartheid regime‟s reliance on racism to conduct its affairs such as the distribution of basic services and socio-economic wealth of the country. As such, the African National Congress (ANC) came up with different policies and programmes aimed at significantly transforming these skewed and racialised socio-economic conditions. Socio-economic empowerment was identified as one of the key programmes to be championed by the new democratic government led by the ANC. To this end, tenders or public procurement formed a vital element of the economic strategies that were put in place as a means of empowering black entrepreneurs with a view that they will in turn empower others through the means of „trickledown‟ economics. Tender guidelines were designed to advance this programme in a transparent, fair and cost-effective way. Contrary to this noble idea, the practice of tenders has become synonymous with acts of bribery and financial kickbacks which are serious forms of corruption. In this regard, the electronic and print media report daily about government officials, public servants, politicians and business people who have found a way of manipulating tender rules and other economic empowerment policies to enrich themselves at the expense of the people of South Africa. This study focuses on tenders and corruption in the post-apartheid era. It reviews key programmes such as the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), Batho Pele, Masakhane, Affirmative Action (AA) and Black Economic Empowerment (BEE). The study claims that while these programmes were important, the lack of moral or ethical leadership at all levels of society ate into the moral fibre upon which these programmes were based. On the basis of the evidence presented, this study concluded that the ANC-led government was correct in using public procurement as one of its methods to address the legacy of Apartheid. However, the research study also confirmed that corruption is essentially a moral or ethical problem and as such there should be an ethical solution to it. While there are many ethical perspectives, this study found that African ethics in general and Ubuntu in particular is the most relevant type of ethic that could be used as a panacea to corruption. / Thesis (M.A.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2012.
10

An assessment of public accountability mechanisms towards eradicating corruption in the Eastern Cape

Rulashe, Tando January 2015 (has links)
The study critically examined the implementation of Public Accountability strategies and mechanisms: A case of Buffalo City Municipality. The problem statement gave emphases on the multiple cases drawn from stats reflected in domestic surveys that shows how corruption and maladministration have impacted the province negatively as well as the extreme poverty lines that dominate the communities in the republic and also the province. The New Public Management Theory was used to interpret the manner in which the participants were expected to give their views on leadership and accountability among others key issues. The objectives of the study were to; To assess the mechanisms implemented by Buffalo City Municipality., To explore the challenges affecting public accountability enforcement mechanisms in Buffalo City Municipality towards eradicating corruption, Determine the manner through which the Buffalo City Municipality can adopt tried and tested mechanism from Regional, national & international case studies on how to effective enforce public accountability for the sustainable management and curbing of corruption for effective and efficient service delivery and to recommend new mechanisms which Buffalo City Municipality can utilise in enforcing public accountability towards eradicating corruption in its institutions in order to encourage sustainable community development through service delivery. The study adopted a case study approach based on a mixed method paradigm where data was collected through a questionnaire, interviews and document analysis. Case studies are normally associated with qualitative research, but can also be used as a method of inquiry employing a positivist epistemology and ontology. A total sample of 50 participants was chosen through a non-probability sampling technique. The major findings of the study reflected that there is a huge break in communication between government and the citizens in the locality while also establishing that the mechanisms currently being used were only as good as the factors influencing their implementation among other issues. Major recommendations included community engagement, capacity building and skills development, retention and expansion, lack of resources, promote individual independence of the community and the enhancement the Public Participation Unit.

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