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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

The successful implementation of project management in a FMCG Industry by means of a contemporary systems approach

Jayram, Shahir Vishal 03 September 2012 (has links)
M.B.A. / To determine what management skills newly appointed project managers should have to successfully implement project management
22

Business development : a project management approach

Van der Merwe, Andre Philip 22 August 2012 (has links)
D.Phil. / Project management from an industrial development perspective and as an engineering discipline has been researched and published throughout the past century. It could be said that the subject is mature, as recent publications on project management fail to bring new knowledge to light. Research of published work in the form of books, journals, conference proceedings and magazines dedicated to project management, to find factors of success, expose, on analysis, that a "best practice" strategic level model can be derived for a project, revealing a high percentage of repeatability and re-use from project to project. Many of the worlds' leading practitioners concur that a base model for a project does exist; - that is to say, all projects follow a similar model leading to successful execution. What has not been understood is how the emphasis on various aspects of such a model changes between industrial development, and business development. Many business development projects have failed as a direct result of implementing what is known of project management as an engineering discipline, and applying it directly to business development. Research on how project management influences business development is both current and relevant. However, not much can be found in literature. What there is, concentrates on the information technology market segment. Available information on project management from a business development perspective deals with the project rather than with the management. This study analyses how business develops as an economic model to create wealth, and then further analyses how project management impacts on business development. The impact on strategy, structure and processes has been analysed to find how projects impact to improve efficiency and effectiveness within the business, thus further developing the business. A project model was developed and applied to find how application of project management knowledge changes in theory between industrial development, and business development. The result of this research was used to create a project system that would assist in the application of theory to practice. The system was used as a measurement tool to guide what was theoretically applied, and to show how practice changed theory, to a better understanding of how emphasis shifted in the model between engineering application, and management application. The project system was further refined during three consecutive business development case studies: ESKOM Transmission Group, ESKOM Distribution Group, and Gauteng Provincial Government. The lessons learned from these applications were finalised, and the project system evolved into a commercially viable product to aide and assist repeatable success in future applications of project management to business development. Cognisance was taken of international developments to certify the competence of project managers and to evolve project management itself into a profession. Project management is seen to play an important role in the effective and efficient application of all resources to achieve development, not only in industry and business, but in society as well. This aspect impacts on the education of project managers, as society does not develop on the backs of people who know things but on the backs of people who can do things.
23

Die projekbestuursproses : 'n teoretiese beskouing

Dreyer, Werner 28 October 2015 (has links)
M.Com. (Business Economics) / Please refer to full text to view abstract
24

Project management competency factors in the built environment

02 September 2013 (has links)
M.Comm. (Business Management) / Project failures worldwide are still significantly high, despite the availability of project management frameworks, standards, techniques and methodologies. A project’s success is, in part, contingent on effectively managing the constraints of time, costs and performance, and in order to achieve this, it is essential for the project manager to possess and display appropriate competencies. The problem addressed in this study is to gain understanding of the project management competencies needed for the successful implementation of South African Built Environment industry projects. South Africa is faced with the challenge of reducing the huge backlog of infrastructure delivery. Given the delivery prioritisation by the government, the construction industry is the preferred vehicle of delivery. However, the industry lacks the requisite project management expertise and experience to make good on this objective. This study investigates the project management competencies required to improve the performance of the industry in delivering the much-needed infrastructure. The study also identifies those competencies that are instrumental to the effective implementation of project management techniques and examines the contributory issues of project management leadership and project success. Given the aforementioned, a survey was conducted among members of Project Management South Africa (PMSA). The data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using descriptive statistics. Overall, respondents agreed that project management requires much more than just knowing how to manage the constraints of time, costs and performance. Of particular note, respondents indicated that, in addition to the more commonly emphasised project administration expertise (i.e. setting and managing scope, timelines and budgets), a project manager must be competent in structuring the project task and clarifying scope, communicating effectively, developing the project objectives, showing reliability and planning the project economy. ii This study contributes to research and practice in two ways. Firstly, we identify and report on core project management competencies. The identified competencies also contribute to the available literature. Secondly, the study proposes a framework that would provide an organisation with a system for recruitment, measuring performance, identifying training and development needs of individual employees and rewarding effective performance for superior performers. The study is significant because by gaining a greater understanding of what key competencies are needed to effectively manage a Built Environment industry project, more effective education and training methods, as well as procedures, can be developed to facilitate the instruction of the defined key competencies and improve the effectiveness of future project managers in the South African Built Environment industry. It furthermore adds to the existing body of project management competency research.
25

Inter-organisational issues facing implementation of project management maturity

Preussler, Rainer Christian 04 September 2012 (has links)
Repetitive project failures or underperformance and ever increasing competition have given impetus for the need to drastically improve project performance within professional services organisations. This realisation has prompted actions to drive restitution efforts to enhance successful delivery and overall project management throughout the organisation. However, the desired outcomes to improve project management processes at an organisational level have not always been forthcoming in light of improvement activities implemented through various changes in operating procedures. The purpose of study is to investigate and identify, from an intra-organisational perspective, the factors required to bring about enhanced implementation and continuous improvements in project management processes; and to determine how they must be aligned to a successful strategy implementation for attainment of higher states of organisational project management maturity. The study focuses on project intensive organisations, mainly implementing information communication technology (ICT), business services and financial related projects. Through the use of a literature review, augmented by a quantitative survey, the perceived impacts and values of the determined factors on project management maturity were gathered. The research study shows that companies wanting to improve project management maturity must steer away from focussing only on certain processes, but must take a holistic view, encompassing a variety of internal factors, ranging from components of organisational learning, to change management and strategy implementation. The identified factors will provide impetus for organizations to create and leverage the drivers, fostering a climate for continuous project performance improvements and ultimately giving them the ability for moving to higher levels of maturity. / Graduate School for Business Leadership / (M.B.A.)
26

Inter-organisational issues facing implementation of project management maturity

Preussler, Rainer Christian 04 September 2012 (has links)
Repetitive project failures or underperformance and ever increasing competition have given impetus for the need to drastically improve project performance within professional services organisations. This realisation has prompted actions to drive restitution efforts to enhance successful delivery and overall project management throughout the organisation. However, the desired outcomes to improve project management processes at an organisational level have not always been forthcoming in light of improvement activities implemented through various changes in operating procedures. The purpose of study is to investigate and identify, from an intra-organisational perspective, the factors required to bring about enhanced implementation and continuous improvements in project management processes; and to determine how they must be aligned to a successful strategy implementation for attainment of higher states of organisational project management maturity. The study focuses on project intensive organisations, mainly implementing information communication technology (ICT), business services and financial related projects. Through the use of a literature review, augmented by a quantitative survey, the perceived impacts and values of the determined factors on project management maturity were gathered. The research study shows that companies wanting to improve project management maturity must steer away from focussing only on certain processes, but must take a holistic view, encompassing a variety of internal factors, ranging from components of organisational learning, to change management and strategy implementation. The identified factors will provide impetus for organizations to create and leverage the drivers, fostering a climate for continuous project performance improvements and ultimately giving them the ability for moving to higher levels of maturity. / Graduate School for Business Leadership / (M.B.A.)
27

Stakeholder management in university fundraising projects

Adams, Deidre 18 February 2020 (has links)
The systematic, downward trend in state funding support to public higher education has resulted in many higher education institutions undertaking large-scale, coordinated fundraising projects or capital campaigns in order to increase third stream income. There is a dearth of research which explores stakeholder management – one of the key knowledge areas in project management – in the public higher education fundraising environment. This research study set out to identify the issues which need to be considered when developing a stakeholder management strategy for fundraising projects at a South African public higher education institution. A qualitative, case study approach was adopted, with semi-structured interviews used to obtain the data. Thematic analysis was used for identifying and analysing patterns or themes within data. The University of Cape Town (UCT) was selected as the case. The research identified that there are a number and variety of stakeholders in the UCT fundraising environment. This could give rise to project complexity affecting the stakeholder landscape. The research highlighted there was a main focus on internal stakeholders, as well as certain external stakeholders necessary for providing third stream income to the university. Some of the strategies used to manage stakeholders were also those identified as critical success factors for effective stakeholder management. The research highlighted the importance of relationship management and stewardship as stakeholder management strategies, which supports the normative approach of stakeholder management. The study found that internal stakeholders possibly cause uncertainty in projects, and hence stakeholder management strategies could mitigate against the possible negative effects.
28

Importance and management of IT project stakeholders

Khatieb, Muhammad Zaid January 2018 (has links)
Information technology project success rates remain low despite increased investments in information systems and their importance for contemporary organisations. Both research and practice suggest that stakeholders play a key role in ensuring the successful delivery of projects. The success or failure of a project is significantly influenced by a combination of the stakeholders' needs, and the ability and readiness of the project manager to effectively coordinate and manage these aspects. This research sought to explore and understand the importance and management of IT project stakeholders. A mixed-method approach, using thematic analysis and descriptive statistics was followed. Semi-structured interviews, along with a survey questionnaire, were conducted with a selected sample of IT project managers and IT managers, from various sectors. Results of this study indicate that the project team, technical expert, subject matter expert, and the project sponsor are considered the most important stakeholders on IT projects. Furthermore, the results indicate that supplier/vendor, customer/client and project team are considered to be the stakeholders that cause the most uncertainty and problems on IT projects. Lastly, the results of this study indicate that failure to identify one or more stakeholders on an IT project can have a potential negative impact on overall project delivery. Key themes were also identified which provide context to the results of the findings. The results of this research will prove beneficial to IT project managers as it will assist in providing insight into which stakeholders require greater focus regarding stakeholder management, thereby working toward improving IT project delivery results.
29

An exploration of corporate real estate management outsourcing practices in South Africa

Modise, Tapiwa P 15 May 2019 (has links)
Purpose – The considerations of non-real estate private organisations in South Africa when outsourcing their corporate real estate management (CREM) functions are examined. The investigation seeks to determine the elements that impact the decision to outsource CREM functions; the characteristics looked for in service providers and if there is a mismatch between what corporate entities desire from CREM outsourcing and what service providers deliver. Design – The study is grounded on a broad analysis of the literature globally and locally; as well as data collected through semi-structured interviews to build four (4) case studies; to gather information about a small set of organisations, within the Johannesburg Metropolitan area of South Africa, on their CREM outsourcing activities. Inductive content analysis will be used to analyse the data collected. Findings – All the organisations outsource parts of their CREM. However, the incidence of CREM outsourcing has neither increased nor decreased in the last three (3) years. Four (4) CREM services are outsourced; facilities management is the most frequently outsourced, followed by subject matter expertise in second and real estate management and transaction management in joint third. The majority of the organisations adhere to a global outsourcing strategy, as opposed to a local or no strategy. Correspondingly, the majority of the organisations have a formal guideline. Seven (7) motives or drivers for CREM outsourcing were uncovered. Access to technical expertise and flexibility were both in first place, followed by cost savings and lack of internal resources in joint second and access to local expertise, focus on core business value chain activities and risk mitigation in shared third. South African organisations identify service providers through four (4) mechanisms: firstly a request for proposals (advertising), direct approach in second and associate recommendations and third-party search in joint third. Seventeen (17) characteristics were identified that influence the selection of a service provider. Of greatest weight is references/reputation, relevant experience, the amount of fee charged and technical expertise in joint first. In joint second; local experience, understanding the client’s organisation, flexible service terms, integrity of approach, regulatory compliance and business values and ethos. This is followed by service provider capacity, individual capability, unconflicted, strong management capability, transparency, strong advisory capability and trust in shared third. The majority of the organisations judged CREM outsourcing successful and twelve (12) attributes were identified that impact the success of CREM outsourcing. Strong advisory capability dominated the list, followed by understanding the client’s organisation and technical expertise in mutual second place. In shared third place, unconflicted, strong management capability, professional integrity, market knowledge value-add, delivering the pledged service, flexible service terms, responsiveness, cost savings and transparency. Practical Implications – A strengthened and grounded understanding of the considerations of non-real estate private organisations in South Africa within the process of CREM outsourcing, will provide an empirical foundation upon which service providers may base their strategic positioning within the local market.
30

Reviewing risk management tools for construction projects and the implementation of project management strategies

Lungu, Able Benson 25 February 2020 (has links)
Purpose - The research reviewed risk management tools for construction projects and the implementation of project management strategies, in which prominence is found in the use of the integrated use of value management and risk management adapted from the Integrated Approach for Soft Value Management. The study was based on a school construction project which was used as a case study at which the researcher’s role is that of ‘Project Manager’. The project status before the study was that it was almost 100% behind schedule and experienced a wide variety of problems ranging from constant site shut-downs due to community protests, contract scope changes, poor quality workmanship and material related setbacks. The study, through literature review, considered some of the methods currently used in the built environment to mitigate unforeseen problems to construction projects and ascertained the extent to which these tools and techniques for risk management on construction projects were used. The idea behind this was to review, document and package the application of a project management strategy that would be suitably effective for resolving the problems faced on the project site. Design – The research design used in this study was the ‘Case study design’ and ‘Experimental design’ in which the ‘Action-research’ approach and ‘Embedded survey within a case study’ were employed on the construction project site, managed by the researcher in his capacity as Project Manager. This was done by organising role-players as participants in focus group workshops facilitated by the researcher where the participants interacted with the researcher and amongst themselves in an effort to identify and find possible problems affecting the project. The researcher introduced stimulating action to project management processes based on the information sourced from the literature review and data obtained from focus group workshops where the outcomes were observed, recorded, analysed and conclusions drawn. Results – The investigation results revealed that the applied management strategies in form of the approach adapted from the integrated use of value and risk management provided a conclusion that the approach was an effective and preferable technique to use in comparison with the commonly used contingencies and float for risk management on construction projects. The above processes also confirmed its relevance as an appropriate technique for risk management of most unforeseen problems which have an effect on the three constraints of time, cost and quality. A further analysis of literature reviewed, which was also supported by other studies previously undertaken, concluded that most professionals in the construction sector such as Quantity Surveyors, Construction Managers, Project Managers and Architects were aware of Value Management but rarely applied it on projects for risk management purposes. Practical Implications – Developing a standard model for the implementation of measures to deal or manage unplanned problems on a project is a challenge as most projects do not have a set model to deal with unforeseen project problems which compels the reliance on contingencies and float. However, any envisaged model must be supported by a quality control system which allows for easy implementation of interventions. The prototype step model conceptualised by the researcher is intended to enable project functionaries and project managers through its unique and easy steps to navigate through any problem which may be encountered on a project. This is regardless of the project phase in which such challenges manifest as there is no preferred model capable of resolving much more than one setback at any given time in comparison with the strategy recommended by this study, which may also be applicable to other sites where similar dynamics exist. Limitations – The study was conducted in a confined environment which required to be confirmed through longitudinal research which is broader and based on many different projects hence the results could not be generalised but only limited to the current project and further research was recommended. The single case study design was also a limitation as the results were not broad enough and were also subjective for generalisation to other project sites. Conclusion – This project management strategy in which the integrated value management approach was used has the potential of being employed as an intervention technique for unforeseen problems related to construction projects provided the processes derived from further research are documented and packaged into a process to be used as a standard model. The project management strategy has the potential to mitigate problems related to time, cost and quality only during the three phases of the project which are, initiation, planning, and implementation and excludes the closing phase to enhance project value. In iii essence, when the project cost and time are effectively managed and reduced, with enhanced quality, the result is an improved project with significant prospects of success.

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