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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Resilience Engineering within ATM - Development, adaption, and application of the Resilience Analysis Grid (RAG)

Ljungberg, Daniel, Lundh, Viktor January 2013 (has links)
Resilience Engineering has evolved during the recent century and could be a good complement to the prevailing ideas concerning safety within the air traffic industry. The concept of Resilience Engineering stresses the fact that in order to keep up the high standard of safety, there must be greater attention directed to the importance of being proactive, and to implement measures before dangerous situations arises. The purpose of our work was to develop the Resilience Analysis Grid (RAG) to help LFV, the leading Air Navigation Service Provider in Sweden, to identify their ability to deal with disturbances and unexpected events. By testing our RAG on seven active air traffic controllers and operational managers, we were able to produce a final set of assertions, with a total number of 22 items, which LFV (or other similar organisations) can use as a foundation for future RAG studies. As a first attempt we also rated the answers which gave us an opportunity to produce a star diagram, showing the relationship between the areas covered by the RAG. During the interviews we discovered that resilience is already today in many aspects a big part of the everyday work and that the RAG method can therefore be applicable in the industry with some modification. However, there are certain areas within LFV that we believe there is room for improvements. We believe that the RAG could serve as a helpful tool in identifying these areas as well as assisting LFV in their striving to remain one of the safest organisations in the world.
2

Resilience Engineering within ATM - Development, adaption, and application of the Resilience Analysis Grid (RAG)

Ljungberg, Daniel, Lundh, Viktor January 2013 (has links)
Resilience Engineering has evolved during the recent century and could be a good complement to the prevailing ideas concerning safety within the air traffic industry. The concept of Resilience Engineering stresses the fact that in order to keep up the high standard of safety, there must be greater attention directed to the importance of being proactive, and to implement measures before dangerous situations arises. The purpose of our work was to develop the Resilience Analysis Grid (RAG) to help LFV, the leading Air Navigation Service Provider in Sweden, to identify their ability to deal with disturbances and unexpected events. By testing our RAG on seven active air traffic controllers and operational managers, we were able to produce a final set of assertions, with a total number of 22 items, which LFV (or other similar organisations) can use as a foundation for future RAG studies. As a first attempt we also rated the answers which gave us an opportunity to produce a star diagram, showing the relationship between the areas covered by the RAG. During the interviews we discovered that resilience is already today in many aspects a big part of the everyday work and that the RAG method can therefore be applicable in the industry with some modification. However, there are certain areas within LFV that we believe there is room for improvements. We believe that the RAG could serve as a helpful tool in identifying these areas as well as assisting LFV in their striving to remain one of the safest organisations in the world.
3

Resilience in aphasia: perspectives of stroke survivors and their families

Cyr, Regan Unknown Date
No description available.
4

Sexuality Related Social Support Among Same-Sex Attracted Youth

Doty, Nathan Daniel 09 June 2009 (has links)
Supportive relationships with parents and peers are thought to be important in helping gay, lesbian, bisexual, or questioning youth cope with stressors related to their sexual identity. However, studies of same-sex attracted youth have yielded only minimal evidence for the link between social support and mental health. The lack of empirical findings may relate to inadequate measurement of the types of social support most relevant for same-sex attracted youth. Using matching theory as a theoretical framework, the present study examined same-sex attracted youth's perceptions of support for coping with problems specifically related to their sexuality. Ninety-eight same-sex attracted young people ages 18-21 were asked about support from family members, heterosexual friends, and sexual minority friends for dealing with problems related to, and not related to, their sexuality. Sexuality related life stressors, substance use severity, and symptoms of emotional distress were also assessed. A within-subject factorial ANOVA revealed differences between sexuality related support and non-sexuality related support across the three relationship types. From family members and heterosexual peers, participants perceived sexuality related support as less available than support for problems not related to sexuality. Non-heterosexual peers provided the highest levels of sexuality related support, and were seen as equally supportive across sexuality related and non-sexuality related domains. Linear regression analyses examined the roles of sexuality related and non-sexuality related support in predicting two mental health outcomes: emotional distress and substance use severity. Contrary to expectations, main effects for sexuality related support and non-sexuality related support did not predict emotional distress. Tests of "buffering" models revealed participants' overall perceptions of sexuality related support moderated the relationship between sexuality stress and psychological distress, such that higher levels of sexuality related support may have been protective. Perceptions of non-sexuality related support, on the other hand, did not moderate links between sexuality stress and emotional distress. Neither main effect nor buffering models were significant in predicting substance use severity. Results of this study provide important information about the types of social support most relevant to same-sex attracted youth.
5

Resilience in aphasia: perspectives of stroke survivors and their families

Cyr, Regan 06 1900 (has links)
This study investigated factors associated with resilience in individuals with aphasia. Resilience is a phenomenon demonstrated when a healthy system of adaptation is present across several levels including individual or personal, family, community or society, in response to exposure to adversity such as communication impairment. Resilience was examined from the perspective of individuals who have experienced aphasia, and their families and caregivers. Sub-factors associated with successful outcomes for individuals with aphasia were identified through a qualitative approach using content analysis of personal interviews with persons who have experienced aphasia, their families, and caregivers. These sub-factors were grouped thematically to constitute the following major factors associated with the demonstration of resilience: support networks, person-first, and thinking positively. These factors represent the views of people with aphasia and their caregivers who participated in this study, and parallel factors associated with resilience that have been identified in previous research with related populations. / Speech Language Pathology
6

The relationship between experience of being parented in childhood, self-reflection and ability as a foster carer

Tyrrell, Zoe Francesca January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
7

Physical and Social Systems Resilience Assessment and Optimization

Romero Rodriguez, Daniel 10 May 2018 (has links)
Resilience has been measured using qualitative and quantitative metrics in engineering,economics, psychology, business, ecology, among others. This dissertation proposes a resilience metric that explicitly incorporates the intensity of the disruptive event to provide a more accurate estimation of system resilience. A comparative analysis between the proposed metric and average performance resilience metrics for linear and nonlinear loss and recovery functions suggests that the new metric enables a more objective assessment of resilience for disruptions with different intensities. Moreover, the proposed metric is independent of a control time parameter. This provides a more consistent resilience estimation for a given system and when comparing different systems. The metric is evaluated in the study of community resilience during a pandemic influenza outbreak and the analysis of supply chain resilience. As a result, the model quantifies constant, increasing and decreasing resilience, enables a better understanding of system response capabilities in contrast with traditional average performance resilience metrics that always capture decreasing resilience levels when the disruptive events magnitude increases. In addition, resilience drivers are identified to enhance resilience against disruptive events. Once resilience drivers have been found, then a multi-objective resource allocation model is proposed to improve resilience levels. Previous resilience optimization models have been developed mainly based on a single resilience metric. The existing bi-objective models typically maximize resilience while the recovery cost is minimized. Although the single metric approach improves system resilience some of their limitations are that the solution is highly dependent on the selected resilience index and generally few optimal points are found. To overcome the rigidity of a unique metric a bi-objective model is proposed to maximize two key resilience dimensions, the absorptive and restorative capacities. This approach has the potential to offer multiple non-dominated solutions increasing decision makers alternatives where the single metric solutions are included.
8

Benchmarking the Resilience of Organisations

Stephenson, Amy Victoria January 2010 (has links)
Our world is more technologically advanced and interdependent, risks are increasingly shared across local, regional and national boundaries and we are more culturally diverse than ever before. As a result, communities are increasingly confronted with emergencies and crises which challenge their social and economic stability. To be resilient, communities rely on services and employment provided by organisations, to enable them to plan for, respond to, and recover from emergencies and crises. However organisational and community resilience are two sides of the same coin; if organisations are not prepared to respond to emergencies and crises, communities too are not prepared. Resilient organisations are also better poised to develop competitive advantage. However despite the potential business and performance rewards of becoming more resilient, organisations struggle to prioritise resilience and to allocate resources to resilience, which could be put to more immediate use. To enable organisations to invest in their resilience, the business case for resilience must be better than the case for new equipment or new staff. This thesis develops a methodology and survey tool for measuring and benchmarking organisational resilience. Previous qualitative case study research is reviewed and operationalised as a resilience measurement tool. The tool is tested on a random sample of Auckland organisations and factor analysis is used to further develop the instrument. The resilience benchmarking methodology is designed to guide organisations’ use of the resilience measurement tool and its incorporation into business-as-usual continuous improvement. Significant contributions of this thesis include a new model of organisational resilience, the resilience measurement tool, and the resilience benchmarking methodology. Together these outputs translate the concept of resilience for organisations and provide information on resilience strengths and weaknesses that enable them to proactively address their resilience and to develop a business case for resilience investment.
9

RESILIENCY IN ADOLESCENT COLLEGE STUDENTS

Ahern, Nancy 01 April 2008 (has links)
The construct of resilience has gained considerable attention over the last four decades since researchers observed that children and youth could cope and adapt in spite of adversity. Resilience involves a dynamic process involving an interaction between both risk and protective processes, internal and external to the individual, that can modify the effects of an adverse life event. Adolescence is considered to be a period of vulnerability for most individuals as they often partake in high risk behaviors. Further, those individuals who are in their early college years are faced with the developmental challenges of this life phase which can be complicated by a variety of stresses. Investigating resilience in college students is of great importance as these adolescents may incur additional stress as they make the transition to adulthood. Empirical evidence indicates that resilience is dynamic, developmental in nature, and interactive with one's environment. A variety of variables have been studied to clarify the concept of resilience in adolescents, yet there continues to be inconsistent findings. Although there is an abundance of literature regarding adolescent resilience, little is known about this process in the healthy well-adjusted adolescent college student. Additionally there are inconsistencies in reported findings about whether resilience is a healthy state. There is also evidence in the literature that contradictions exist regarding the effect of social support on this process. After review of the psychometric properties of existing instruments, the Resilience Scale was determined to have the best reliability and validity use for the study of resilience in the adolescent population. An exploratory model testing design was used to explore the relationships among a set of variables, including personal characteristics, levels of stress, high risk behaviors, and levels of resilience in adolescents ages 18 to 20 years. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained prior to data collection. The study participants attended a community college and met the sample selection criteria. A convenience sampling plan was used. Recruitment of participants followed the college protocol for contacting professors teaching general education classes during the planned data collection time. The study measures included a demographic questionnaire, two perceived stress visual analog scales, the Health Behaviors Questionnaire, and the Resilience Scale. Descriptive statistics were computed for all variables for the total sample (n=166) and recoding performed as needed by the instruments. Model testing was performed using correlations, hierarchical multiple regression, and path analysis to identify the strongest predictive variables. The strongest predictive model was personal characteristics and Health Behaviors Questionnaire Emotional Risk to the visual analog scale Stress in General (R2 = .519, F = 3.13, p = .000). This model was used for path analysis and the significant variables were ethnicity (standardized beta coefficients of .165, p = .036) and Health Behaviors Questionnaire Emotional Risk (standardized beta coefficients of .567, p = .000). These findings are important for health care providers to use as a basis for driving interventions to optimize resilience and reduce stress in adolescents. Further research should focus on ways to enhance coping and adaptation in an effort to reduce emotional risks which potentially increase stress in similar populations. Research regarding resilience and stress can further be expanded to the study of additional populations at risk, including adults and others such as nursing students, war veterans, and disaster victims. / Ph.D. / School of Nursing / Health and Public Affairs / Nursing PhD
10

The development of resilience : a model : a thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology /

Maginness, Ali. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Canterbury, 2007. / Typescript (photocopy). "June 2007." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 169-189). Also available via the World Wide Web.

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