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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Using the self-as-a-model with video editing in athletic performance

Boyer, Brent Leonard 01 January 1987 (has links)
A study was designed in order to assess the effectiveness of a positive self-modeling strategy in increasing the performance of four University of the Pacific baseball players. A multiple baseline design across participants was used as a means of assessing the effectiveness of the self-modeling technique. Participants viewed edited positive self-modeling videotapes of their own batting performance. Measures were taken on: (a) the number of line drive hits; (b) ground ball hits; (c) the number of times the participant hit a ground ball, but was thrown out; (d) the number of times the participant hit a line drive, but it was caught; (e) swings and misses; (f) not swinging at a strike (called strikes); (g) not swinging at a ball (called balls); (h) the number of foul balls; and (i) the number of pop ups. In addition, batting averages were kept for game performance. It was expected that participants would show an increase in hits, a decrease in hit outs, a decrease in called strikes, an increase in called balls, a decrease in foul balls, and an increase in batting average when each participant began the positive self-modeling. The performance of those participants not yet viewing their positive self-modeling tape was not expected to show such improvement. Improvement was observed in three out of the four participants.
22

The helpfulness of self-help reading as described by self-guided, adult female readers

Bruneau, Laura S. 25 April 2007 (has links)
No description available.
23

The use of a self-help treatment intervention for panic disorder with agoraphobia

Gould, Robert Andrew 07 June 2006 (has links)
A recent study suggested that bibliotherapy may be an effective intervention for panic disordered individuals with agoraphobia. The present study attempted to enhance this bibliotherapy intervention by adding audio- and videotape self-help supplements. Thirty subjects suffering panic disorder with mild to moderate agoraphobia were matched on level of avoidance and then randomly assigned to 1) a Wait-list control condition (WL). or 2) a Self-help condition (SH). The intervention lasted four weeks followed by an eight week post treatment phase. and follow-up measures at the end of this phase. Results indicated that, from pre-treatment to follow-up, SH subjects improved significantly on 11 of the 12 dependent measures used in this study. while WL subjects did not. Furthermore. SH subjects were significantly more improved than WL subjects at follow-up with regard to agoraphobic avoidance, coping with panic attacks, self efficacy for mild, moderate and severe attacks, and for two critical measures of distress: frequency of panic attacks. and total severity of each attack. Clinical outcome measures also supported the effectiveness of the self-help approach. More than two-thirds of SH subjects met the criteria for clinical improvement. While only one-quarter of WL subjects met these criteria. Implications for the treatment of panic disordered individuals are discussed, as is the role of self-efficacy in mediating clinical change. / Ph. D.
24

A self-help problem-solving video for parents and teens: social validity and generalization of acquired skills

Hook, Richard J. 19 June 2006 (has links)
A self-administered problem-solving skill training video for nonclinical families with teens is evaluated. The study focuses on the generalization of skills to naturalistic family conversations and the program's social validity: potential iatrogenic aggravation of family problems, perceived effectiveness, and program enjoyment. Seventy families with young teens were randomly assigned to two treatment groups. One group (skill) viewed a skill training program that included information about the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Another group (control) viewed a similar program that lacked the skill training component. Family conversations were recorded in the families' homes before (pretest), two weeks after (posttest), and four months after (follow-up) the families received the programs. In an associated study, the skill group demonstrated greater levels of skill than controls in role-plays. In the present study, skill families demonstrated greater knowledge of problem-solving than controls at posttest and follow-up (p < .001). Analysis of the conversations revealed generally superior skill performance in the skill group. Significant group differences in skill were found in naturalistic conversations about previously discussed problems at posttest (p < .05). Performance differences in conversations about novel topics were not significant. No significant skill differences were observed at follow-up. Correlations of skill measures from the role-play and conversation assessments revealed moderate behavioral consistency (r = -.02 to .37). The conversation analysis revealed no significant group differences in the number of families showing increases or decreases in their use of degrading comments after program exposure, but a somewhat significantly greater number of skill families demonstrated a reduction in the number of additional problems raised in their conversations at posttest and follow-up (p = .06). No significant group differences were found in observer ratings of problem-solving effectiveness, measures of parent problem-solving confidence, family ratings of the program's effects on their ability to cope with family problems, program enjoyment, or satisfaction with the management of family problems. Implications for the development of effective, socially valid, self-help, media programs are discussed. / Ph. D.
25

The reading of self-help books by intermediate phase teachers in Gauteng townships.

Wilson, Hilary 15 February 2013 (has links)
This research focuses on the reading of self-help books, or ‘advice literature’, by Intermediate Phase teachers in Soweto schools. The study is based on Bourdieu’s concept of habitus, other theories about the nature of literacy practices and how initial literacy is mediated. It includes a survey of the political and social factors that may have influenced the teachers’ attitudes to reading. It includes interview data on the topics they favour, their perceptions of the effects of such books on their own lives, whether or not they read other genres, such as children’s books, and whether or not their reading impacts on the methods they use in teaching children to read. It therefore contributes to a broader understanding of the literacy habitus of the subject group, and, viewed within the context of the literacy crisis in South African schools, provides insights into their attitudes towards reading and the reasons why they often fail to extend their learners’ reading abilities beyond the level of basic decoding.
26

Panic! Its Prevalence, Diagnosis and Treatment via the Internet

Carlbring, Per January 2004 (has links)
<p>As evidenced by several trials, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD). However, therapists are short in supply, and patients with agoraphobia may not seek therapy due to fear of leaving their homes or traveling certain distances. A major challenge therefore is to increase the accessibility and affordability of evidence-based psychological treatments.</p><p>This thesis is based on five studies; three treatment studies set up as randomized controlled trails (RCT), one prevalence study, and one study testing the equivalence of an Internet-administered diagnostic assessment tool with a clinician-administered interview.</p><p>Study I showed that the Swedish 12-month PD prevalence is consistent with findings in most other parts of the Western world (2.2%; CI 95% 1.0%-3.4%). There was a significant sex difference, with a greater prevalence for women (3.6%) compared to men (0.7%).</p><p>Study II showed that the validity of the computerized diagnostic interview (CIDI-SF) was generally low. However, the agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder modules had good specificity and sensitivity, respectively.</p><p>The three RCTs showed, directly or indirectly, that Internet-based self-help is superior to a waiting-list. When 10 individual weekly sessions of CBT for PD was compared with a 10-module self-help program on the Internet, the results suggest that Internet-administered self-help, plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail, is as effective as traditional individual CBT (80% vs. 67% no longer met criteria for panic disorder; composite within-group effect size was Cohen’s <i>d</i>= 0.78 vs. 0.99). One-year follow-up confirmed the results (92% vs. 88% no longer met criteria for panic disorder; <i>d</i>= 0.80 vs. 0.93). The results generally provide evidence to support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed self-help programs.</p>
27

Panic! Its Prevalence, Diagnosis and Treatment via the Internet

Carlbring, Per January 2004 (has links)
As evidenced by several trials, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD). However, therapists are short in supply, and patients with agoraphobia may not seek therapy due to fear of leaving their homes or traveling certain distances. A major challenge therefore is to increase the accessibility and affordability of evidence-based psychological treatments. This thesis is based on five studies; three treatment studies set up as randomized controlled trails (RCT), one prevalence study, and one study testing the equivalence of an Internet-administered diagnostic assessment tool with a clinician-administered interview. Study I showed that the Swedish 12-month PD prevalence is consistent with findings in most other parts of the Western world (2.2%; CI 95% 1.0%-3.4%). There was a significant sex difference, with a greater prevalence for women (3.6%) compared to men (0.7%). Study II showed that the validity of the computerized diagnostic interview (CIDI-SF) was generally low. However, the agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder modules had good specificity and sensitivity, respectively. The three RCTs showed, directly or indirectly, that Internet-based self-help is superior to a waiting-list. When 10 individual weekly sessions of CBT for PD was compared with a 10-module self-help program on the Internet, the results suggest that Internet-administered self-help, plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail, is as effective as traditional individual CBT (80% vs. 67% no longer met criteria for panic disorder; composite within-group effect size was Cohen’s d= 0.78 vs. 0.99). One-year follow-up confirmed the results (92% vs. 88% no longer met criteria for panic disorder; d= 0.80 vs. 0.93). The results generally provide evidence to support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed self-help programs.
28

Self-regulation of the driving behaviour of older drivers /

Baldock, M. R. J. January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Psychology, and, Centre for Automotive safety Research , 2004? / Includes bibliographical references (p. 396-420). Also available online.
29

The nature and extent of participation in CBR in Midlands Province in Zimbabwe

Myezwa, Hellen 28 July 2005 (has links)
No abstract available. / Dissertation (MPhyst)--University of Pretoria, 2006. / Physiotherapy / Unrestricted
30

Breaking the Silence : the stories of men who are survivors of childhood sexual abuse

Meduric, Hayley Christina 05 May 2010 (has links)
This research focuses on the personal stories surrounding men who were sexually abused in childhood. The aim of this study is to shed light on the experiences of these men, and attempt to lift the veil of secrecy and stigma attached to male childhood sexual abuse. Three participants were selected for this qualitative study using the selection procedure of purposive sampling. Each participant was introduced with the use of a semi-structured interview format, and the information that was obtained from each participant was explored using a hermeneutic analysis approach. The results suggest that society’s naivety and ignorance of issues pertaining to sexually abused men are prominent. Both differences and similarities, in relation to the experiences of these men, are evident. With particular reference to the three participants whom partook in this study, the differing experiences that appear significant are suicidal ideation; low self-esteem; flashbacks; fear of men in general; and mind-body separation. The similar experiences that are evident within the participants’ stories are their desire for secrecy; fear of what society may think of them; desperate attempts to cope and subsequently escape the memories of their pasts; long-lasting effects, such as a lack of trust and an absence of intimacy; and determination to move forward and prevail. / Psychology / M.A. (Clinical Psychology)

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