• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 16
  • 16
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Studies on the C-reactive proteins

Osmand, Alexander Peter January 1972 (has links)
Fig. C-14 in back pocket / xi, 171, xxxix leaves : ill. ; 25 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Thesis (Ph.D.) from the Dept. of Microbiology, University of Adelaide, 1973
2

Serum protein changes after burn injury

Moody, B. J. January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
3

Comparison of the rat proteins alphamacrofetoprotein and decidualisation-associated-protein

Teixeira, N. A. A. January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
4

Horizontal starch gel electrophoresis as a technique for examining gray squirrel population genetics

Otto, Ralph Albert 08 June 2010 (has links)
The use of horizontal starch gel electrophoresis to separate gray squirrel blood serum was investigated. Three sources of variation in the techniques were identified: (1) minor variation within-run; (2) variation across-run; (3) variation due to the sampling technique. The frequencies of the most anodal bands of 42 gray squirrel blood serum protein electropherograms were compared among several woodlots using chi-square contingency tables. On the basis of these frequencies, no differences were found among the woodlot populations of gray squirrels examined in this study. / Master of Science
5

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development

Matheney, Kara J. 2009 August 1900 (has links)
The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P < 0.05) WW and ADG from birth to weaning. Serum IgG at 24 h affected (P = 0.03) WW. Brahman bulls (n = 41) were evaluated for RFI, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), temperament, reproductive development, and ultrasound carcass traits. Serum was collected at d 0 and d 70 of the feeding trial and analyzed for IGF-I. Bulls were classified as efficient, intermediate, or inefficient (RFI classification method I) and as efficient or inefficient (RFI classification method II). Bulls were evaluated for temperament at weaning using TS. Temperament influenced (P < 0.05) IGF-I concentrations at d 0. Reproductive development was not affected (P > 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.
6

Brain injury and hazardous alcohol drinking in trauma patients

Savola, O. (Olli) 11 June 2004 (has links)
Abstract Head injury is the leading cause of death and disability in trauma patients, and alcohol misuse is often associated with such injuries. Despite modern diagnostic facilities, the extent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is difficult to assess and supplementary diagnostic tools are warranted. The contribution of alcohol misuse to traumas also needs to be elucidated, as the role of different patterns of alcohol drinking in particular has received less attention. We investigated the clinical utility of a novel serum marker of brain damage, protein S100B, as a tool for assessing TBI in patients with trauma. We also investigated the patterns of alcohol drinking among trauma patients and the trauma mechanisms in relation to blood alcohol concentration (BAC), with special emphasis on head traumas. Finally, we studied the early identification of hazardous drinkers among trauma patients. Serum protein S100B was found to be a feasible supplementary method for assessing TBI, as the latter was shown to elevate its levels significantly, the highest values being found in patients with severe injuries. S100B was also found to be elevated in patients with mild head injury, where it was associated with an increased risk of developing post-concussion symptoms (PCSs). Extracranial injuries also increased S100B values in patients with multitrauma. Accordingly, S100B was not specific to TBI. The more severe the extracranial injury, the higher the S100B value that was found. Binge drinking was found to be the predominant pattern in trauma patients. Alcohol intoxication on admission and hazardous drinking patterns were more often present in patients with head injury than in those with other types of trauma. The risk of sustaining a head trauma significantly increased with increasing BAC. The results also demonstrated that BAC on admission is the best marker of alcohol misuse in trauma patients. The BAC test depicts hazardous alcohol drinking better than conventional biochemical markers of alcohol misuse such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), or mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of erythrocytes. The findings support the use of S100B as a supplementary method for assessing TBI and the use of BAC as a marker of alcohol misuse in trauma patients.
7

Validation of a colorimetric method for determination of fructosamine in plasma usingMindray BS-380

Eriksson, Louise January 2017 (has links)
HbA1c and glucose are the most widely used indicators for glucose control, but they havesome disadvantages. Improving the diagnosis of diabetes is always ongoing, other markersare needed as a complement when standard measurements are not sufficient. One alternativeis analysis of fructosamine, which is commercially available and inexpensive.The main aim with this study was to validate a colorimetric method for analyzingfructosamine including investigation of precision, linearity and stability. Fructosamine valueswas compared with HbA1c values with and without genetic variations in the hemoglobingene. An investigation on if serum albumin concentration affects fructosamine values wasalso performed. The colorimetric method was also compared with an enzymatic method foranalysis of frutcotsamine.Blood samples were analyzed as HbA1c on Cobas 6000 c501 and for analysis of thegenetic variants Capillarys 3 TERA was used. Plasma was collected and analyzed onMindray BS-380 as fructosamine and albumin.The methods in this study were comparable and the colorimetric method had greatprecision and linearity. The correlation between HbA1c and fructosamine was R2= 0,402.Fructosamine was not affected by genetic variations in the hemoglobin molecule and may bea useful indicator of high glucose and could replace analysis of HbA1c. Fructosamine wasnot affected by albumin. The enzymatic method was shown to correlate better with HbA1cthan the colorimetric method.In conclusion, analyzing fructosamine could be an alternative to HbA1c when patientshave genetic variants and would improve the glycemic control.
8

Hydroxylated and sulfated metabolites of lower chlorinated PCBs bind with high affinity to human serum albumin and exhibit selective toxicity to neuronal cells

Rodriguez, Eric Alberto 01 May 2016 (has links)
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of persistent organic pollutants that have been associated with a myriad of negative human health effects. These man-made compounds were used throughout most of the 20th century and although their intentional production has since been banned and their use limited to closed systems, their prevalence in the environment remains a factor in disease states for exposed populations. The worldwide levels of PCBs has been declining, however, there is evidence for renewed sources of these compounds. The presence of PCBs with lower numbers of chlorine atoms (LC-PCBs) have been verified as unintentional byproducts in paints and pigments, the decomposition of PCB waste, or the recycling or disposal attempts of PCB-laden materials. While exposure to the higher chlorinated congeners (HC-PCBs) is often attributed to the consumption of contaminated water or fatty animal meat, a significant route of exposure to the airborne LC-PCBs is through inhalation. These semi-volatile compounds have been detected in high quantities in both indoor and outdoor air in urban and rural communities, and their presence is pronounced in older buildings (e.g., homes and schools). When compared to HC-PCBs, LC-PCBs are more highly susceptible to metabolic transformations, and recently their sulfated metabolites have gained much interest. Although the sulfation of xenobiotics often is considered a route for their removal from the body, a previous study of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with 4-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 3) resulted in the substantial formation of sulfated metabolites (i.e., hydroxylation followed by sulfation of the LC-PCB). This metabolic route accounted for more than half of the treatment dose. Furthermore, LC-PCB sulfates have been shown to bind to the human serum protein, transthyretin, in vitro. Of the health effects associated with PCB exposure, neurotoxicity has been well established through various laboratory and epidemiological studies. It is proposed that the dopaminergic system lies at the core of the observed cognitive, motor, and intellectual dysfunction observed in exposed populations, especially in children exposed perinatally. Interestingly, PCB exposure has been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) etiology, which is marked by a substantial loss of dopaminergic neurons. This thesis describes studies on the binding of selected LC-PCBs and their hydroxylated and sulfated metabolites to human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in human serum. The displacement of fluorescent probes, selective for the two major drug binding sites of HSA, indicates that LC-PCB sulfates generally bind to HSA with such affinity that is equal to or greater than that for the LC-PCBs or OH-LC-PCBs This work also included a study of the selective toxicity of these compounds to dopaminergic neuronal cells. The selective toxicity of these compounds was studied in a series of immortalized cell lines (i.e., two neuronal cell lines: the rat midbrain-derived N27 cell line, the human neuroblastoma-derived SH-SY5Y cell line, and the human liver-derived HepG2 cell line). The assessment of toxicity by MTT reduction and LDH release in these cellular models indicated that hydroxylated and sulfated metabolites of LC-PCBs exhibited toxicity that was selective to neuronal cells and, in most cases, selective for the dopaminergic neuronal cells. Furthermore, HPLC analysis of the distribution of the compounds from the extracellular medium into the cellular milieu indicated that the observed toxicity may be due in some cases to selective transport and further metabolism. This work contributes to understanding the neurotoxicity of LC-PCB hydroxylated and sulfated metabolites and the role that binding to serum proteins may play in it. Furthermore, it emphasizes the need for future studies on the effects that metabolism, particularly sulfation, may play in the disposition of LC-PCB congeners as it pertains to their metabolism, retention, and toxic effects.
9

The role of chemistry and strut porosity and the influence of serum proteins in modulating cellular response to bone graft substitutes

Castagna, Viviana January 2015 (has links)
The objective of this thesis was to investigate the role of hydroxyapatite and silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite synthetic bone graft substitute (SBG) material properties in modulating the processes of protein adsorption and desorption, and their combined role in the subsequent regulation of cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation on the surfaces of these materials in vitro. As a result of their purported role in promoting osteogenic behaviour in vivo the materials parameters selected for investigation were chemistry (stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HA) versus 0.8wt% silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SA)) and strut porosity (20% versus 30% strut porosity). Cell attachment and response to different SBG was assessed to samples in the ‘as received’ condition as well as after a series of sequentially varied pre-treatments with solutions of phosphate buffered saline or cell culture media either unsupplemented or in combination with mixed serum proteins and/or Fibronectin (Fn). This enabled investigation of the effect of sample chemistry and strut porosity on mixed serum protein interactions and Fn adsorption under both competitive and non-competitive conditions, and the study of subsequent regulation of cell attachment and response as a consequence of pre-treatment. Results showed that serum protein interactions were key to modulation of cell response to chemistry, and there was evidence that for Fn this may be related to conformational changes in the adsorbed protein rather than its level of enrichment in the protein interlayer. In terms of the materials properties investigated strut porosity was found to be the most dominant factor in the regulation of cell response, where SBG with 30% strut porosity promoted human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) osteoblastic differentiation. Moreover hMSC response to SBG with 30% strut porosity seemed to be less sensitive to pre-treatment. In conclusion, the results of these experiments indicate that strut porosity more directly influences the cellular response to HA and SA BGS than chemistry in vitro. Moreover, the role that Fn and other serum proteins have in regulating this response is dependent on the physiological environment and BGS chemistry.
10

Studium tření náhrad kyčelního kloubu / Study of Friction in Hip Joint Replacements

Balounová, Hana January 2013 (has links)
Diploma thesis deals with analysis of coefficient of friction in total hip prosthesis for several materials bearing with presence of bovine serum as substitute of synovial fluid occurred in natural joint. Behavior of coefficient of friction is observed on Mini Traction Machine. Results are plotted at graphs representing dependence of coefficient of friction on time. There are described effects of several kinematic conditions, the influence of used material and the effect of the method of contact lubrication. The experiments analyze how the formation of lubricant film with a layer of adsorbed protein affects coefficient of friction.

Page generated in 0.0515 seconds