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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Gender and age differences in condom use patterns among youth in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a descriptive and analytical study.

Jama, P. Nwabisa January 2006 (has links)
South Africa is estimated to have one of the highest epidemics of HIV infection. Recent youth studies have found that youth aged 15-24 years are increasingly becoming vulnerable to HIV. Condom use is promoted as one of the key HIV prevention methods in South Africa. Face-to-face structured questionnaire interviews were conducted with a volunteer sample of rural active women and men aged 15-26 years living in 70 villages in the Eastern Cape Province. Most of the participants were recruited in schools.
2

Gender and age differences in condom use patterns among youth in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a descriptive and analytical study.

Jama, P. Nwabisa January 2006 (has links)
South Africa is estimated to have one of the highest epidemics of HIV infection. Recent youth studies have found that youth aged 15-24 years are increasingly becoming vulnerable to HIV. Condom use is promoted as one of the key HIV prevention methods in South Africa. Face-to-face structured questionnaire interviews were conducted with a volunteer sample of rural active women and men aged 15-26 years living in 70 villages in the Eastern Cape Province. Most of the participants were recruited in schools.
3

Gender and age differences in condom use patterns among youth in the Eastern Cape, South Africa: a descriptive and analytical study

Jama, P. Nwabisa January 2006 (has links)
Master of Public Health - MPH / South Africa is estimated to have one of the highest epidemics of HIV infection. Recent youth studies have found that youth aged 15-24 years are increasingly becoming vulnerable to HIV. Condom use is promoted as one of the key HIV prevention methods in South Africa. Face-to-face structured questionnaire interviews were conducted with a volunteer sample of rural active women and men aged 15-26 years living in 70 villages in the Eastern Cape Province. Most of the participants were recruited in schools. / South Africa
4

A study to test the concept of new protector plus condom variants.

Kusema, Prudence Mandifusa. January 2006 (has links)
No abstract available. / Thesis (MBA)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, 2006.
5

Partnership working for the promotion of sport and physical activity : an investigation into Community Sports Networks in England

Baker, Colin January 2011 (has links)
Background: Low participation in sport and physical activity pose a continuing public health challenge. In response, partnership approaches have commonly been employed in community public health interventions. However, evidence concerning sport and physical activity partnerships remains underdeveloped. Aim and methods: The aim of the research was to investigate the attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of community stakeholders participating in Community Sports Networks (CSNs) in England. A mixed methods research design was adopted. The quantitative component consisted of a sample of 171 CSN members from across England. The qualitative component consisted of a sample of 23 key informants from a single county in the South West of England. A synthesised grounded theory approach was used to integrate data. This involved: 1. Analysis of survey responses. 2. Analysis of interview transcripts. 3. Analysis of additional data including notes from CSN meetings and secondary documents. In addition, inferential statistical analyses were conducted on the quantitative data to assess the contributions from sets of predictor variables on the value of binary outcome variables. The results showed: 1. Participation in CSNs could be explained by a conceptual model which located 'searching for value' as the core category. Four sub-categories of notionally endorsing, speculating, scrutinising, and embedding helped to explain the participation process. 2. Perceived costs (OR = 0.89, 95% Cl 0.82 to 0.94, P < 0.05) were more important than perceived benefits (OR = 1.05, 95% Cl 0.98 to 1.14, P > 0.05) for predicting sense of satisfaction. Perceived costs (OR= 0.83, 95% Cl 0.74 to 0.94, P < 0.05) and communication (OR= 0.83, 95% Cl 0.67 to 0.81, P < 0.05) were strong predictors of sense of ownership. 3. Perceived benefits may have to be at least twice the level of perceived costs for a favourable cost-benefit ratio. Conclusions: Factors facilitating the creation of value promote stakeholder participation in CSN activities. However, the participation process is subject to a range of challenges which require constant attention.
6

Hiding hot topics: science, sex and schooling in British Columbia, 1910-1916

Swann, Michelle 05 1900 (has links)
Between the years 1910-1916, the Vancouver Medical Association was responsible for designing a sex education program for the British Columbia Public School System. Through the course of the committee's work, the Vancouver Medical Association Sex Hygiene Committee (VMASHC) familiarised themselves with the teachings of the Sex Hygiene movement. The program which they recommend for implementation can be seen as representative of the second stage of North American sex education which advocated the teaching of sex education from the standpoint of biology. The VMASHC can be seen as a pioneer in the effort to teach sex education within Canadian schooling. Considerable time is spent contextualizing and explaining the impetus for the creating the first sex education program in British Columbia. The historical conditions and constraints involved in the birth of sex education are considered. It is argued that the social and political climate of early Vancouver played a direct role in influencing the VMASHC's final creation of what they called "a new line" of sex education in B.C.
7

Hiding hot topics: science, sex and schooling in British Columbia, 1910-1916

Swann, Michelle 05 1900 (has links)
Between the years 1910-1916, the Vancouver Medical Association was responsible for designing a sex education program for the British Columbia Public School System. Through the course of the committee's work, the Vancouver Medical Association Sex Hygiene Committee (VMASHC) familiarised themselves with the teachings of the Sex Hygiene movement. The program which they recommend for implementation can be seen as representative of the second stage of North American sex education which advocated the teaching of sex education from the standpoint of biology. The VMASHC can be seen as a pioneer in the effort to teach sex education within Canadian schooling. Considerable time is spent contextualizing and explaining the impetus for the creating the first sex education program in British Columbia. The historical conditions and constraints involved in the birth of sex education are considered. It is argued that the social and political climate of early Vancouver played a direct role in influencing the VMASHC's final creation of what they called "a new line" of sex education in B.C. / Arts, Faculty of / Anthropology, Department of / Graduate
8

A mixed method investigation into the perception and measurement of success in the Healthwise Exercise Referral Scheme

Mills, Hayley January 2008 (has links)
No description available.
9

The health status and lifestyle behaviours of university students in Nigeria by sex and ethnicity

Agwu, Micheal Ezenna January 2014 (has links)
Background: The health determinant model indicates that certain sociocultural, sociodemographic, environmental, and lifestyle factors influence health status and wellbeing of any population group in any given nation (Dahlgren & Whitehead, 1991). Previous studies have suggested the need for regional and interregional comparison of health inequalities due to the interaction of these factors. However, few studies have undertaken such investigation, especially among university students in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the health status and lifestyle behaviours by sex and ethnicity among university students in Nigeria. Method: The study was cross sectional. Full time university students were recruited from six universities within three ethnic groups in Nigeria for the study. Data collection was both subjective and objective. The subjective data was based on an anonymous questionnaire, while the objective data involved direct measurements of height in (m) weight in (kg), and blood pressure (mmHg). Ultimately, 1549 responses were valid, while 563 responses were rejected for various reasons including missing data especially sex and ethnicity. The variables examined were, socio-demographic, general health, mental health, cognitive resources and lifestyle behaviours. Descriptive tests, chi-square tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were conducted. Results: Regarding regional characteristics in socioeconomic status, the result indicated sex and ethnicity effects, and irrespective of ethnicity, female students had better monthly income than male students did. The result suggested that students from the Hausa ethnic group reported better monthly income than students from the other ethnic groups. There is evidence that income have a significant effect on health determinant factors. For example, income affects the choice of residential location, ability to pay for health care services, register for gym for physical activity, afford healthy lifestyles, (e.g. eating fruits and vegetables), participate in social activities and maintain positive self- esteem (WHO, 2006; Varela-Mato et al., 2012). With regard to social support, the result indicated sex*ethnicity effects, where female students from the Hausa and Igbo ethnic groups reported better social support than male students, in contrast to the Yoruba ethnic group, where male students reported better social support than females. Students from the Hausa ethnic group saw their GPs more often, had regular medications and had depression more than other ethnic groups. In addition, the result indicated higher prevalence of smoking and the use of psychotic drugs among students from the Hausa ethnic group than other groups. On the other hand, the Yoruba ethnic group had the lowest monthly income, saw their GPs few times and had less frequent medication than the other ethnic groups. In addition, students from the Yoruba ethnic group had low consumption of fruits and are more physically inactive compared to other ethnic groups. Regarding sex characteristics, the study suggested that irrespective of ethnicity female students are less healthy when compared to male students. In addition, significant sex *ethnic interaction effects (P < 0.001) were observed, in most variables examined in the study, indicating that the students health and lifestyles are both sex and ethnicity dependent. The study suggested that female students from the Hausa ethnic group reported better income and social support, compared to students from the other ethnic groups; however, they also reported regular medication, overweight or obesity, mental health problems, and poor cognitive health than female students from Igbo and Yoruba ethnic groups. In addition, the Hausa male students’ preferred smaller female body size compared to male students from the other ethnic groups. On the other hand, Igbo female students had a better cognitive health and preferred small female body size than female students from the other ethnic groups. The Yoruba female students are less overweight or obese, but had the highest preference for big female body size and are the least depressed group in the sample. With regard to male students, the result suggested that Igbo male students had regular medication and depression more than other male groups. They also preferred bigger female body size and had better cognitive health than other male groups. On the other hand, Yoruba males reported overweight or obese, than the other male groups. Conclusion: The findings indicated that the health of female students in the sample was poorer than the health of male students; with female students from the Hausa ethnic group, demonstrating the worst possible health outcome. The result also suggested that both high and low socioeconomic statuses are associated with health compromising behaviours among university students in Nigeria. The findings indicated that high cognitive health appraisal might be related to students reporting better mental health especially depression in both male and female students. This study is the first to report that there is an interaction between the different layers of health, in the health determinant model proposed by Dahlgren and Whitehead (1991). Secondly, this study has made a major contribution to the understanding that people who live among regions with conflict and violence may report poor health (both physical and mental) compared to those that live in a conflict free zones. Consequently, the results of the present study suggest that conflict and violence be included among the health determinant factors in the health determinant model proposed by Dahlgren and Whitehead (1991).
10

Young women's health and well-being : a qualitative study

Peters, Eleanor January 1997 (has links)
This thesis is concerned with young women's health and well-being, with a specific focus on young women's beliefs, behaviours and attitudes towards smoking, substance use, sexual health, diet and exercise and well-being. These issues are identified as priorities in 'The Health of the Nation: a Strategy for Health in England', (Department of Health, 1992). This document which was published by a previous (Conservative) government in July 1992,set objectives and targets relating to health status to be met by the year 2000. (There are similar separate documents for both Wales and Scotland.) It identified five key areas for action: coronary heart disease and stroke; cancers; mental illness; HIV/AIDS and sexual health and accidents. Some of its targets apply specifically to young women. Informed by a feminist theory and using ethnographic and qualitative research techniques, this study examines young women's health-related beliefs and behaviours within the context of their day-to-day lives.

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