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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An exploration of the lesbian label among health and kinesiology department academicians

Sartore, Melanie L. 15 May 2009 (has links)
The majority of research investigations into the meaning and implications of the lesbian label within the sport context have primarily focused on coaches, athletes, and physical education teachers. Generally overlooked, however, has been the area of college and university health and kinesiology academia (i.e., sport-related curricula). The purpose of this study was to extend this line of inquiry to this setting within the context of sport. By doing so, investigating the lesbian label, as well as seeking to identify its presence, impact, and potential consequences as they relate to health and kinesiology department members, may contribute to the understanding of why a lesbian stigma persists within the multifaceted context of sport. Further, an additional purpose of this inquiry was to identify whether the use of identity management strategies, and their potential negative consequences, were used in relation to the lesbian label. The lesbian label was investigated through the voices of health and kinesiology department academicians. Through their words it was communicated that not only was the lesbian label and an associated stigma present within their respective departments, but the meaning of lesbianism within sport-related curricula was somewhat reminiscent of the meaning in other sport contexts. Thus, to some extent, the lesbian stigma can be extrapolated from sport to sport-related curricula. While complex, the meaning of lesbianism was intertwined with gender norms, religious beliefs, politics, personal beliefs, interpersonal relationships, societal assumptions, perceptions of powerlessness, and a necessity for self-protection. This was predominantly the case related to a female faculty members’ possession of certain physical characteristics, her physical presentation and attire, relationship status, and proximity to departmental physical activity courses that are regarded as more masculine (e.g., weight training, racquetball, basketball, etc.), in particular. Finally, whether merely acknowledged as being present or advocating for change with regard to perceptions of inequality and injustice, cognitive and emotional resources were allocated to this issue in a variety of ways. Implications of this exploration and its findings are presented and further inquiry encouraged.
2

Evidence of a neurochemical difference between the brains of exclusively homosexual and exclusively heterosexual men : differential effects of fluoxetine on cerebral glucose metabolism /

Kinnunen, Leann Helka. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Chicago, Dept. of Psychology, Committee on Human Development, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references. Also available on the Internet.
3

Males' ipsative score distortion on Affinity 2.0 /

Madsen, Jeffrey B. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ed. S.)--Brigham Young University. Dept. of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 35-39).
4

Ipsative score distortion on Affinity 2.0 /

Brown, Alec J., January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ed. S.)--Brigham Young University. Dept. of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 33-37).
5

Non-pedophilic heterosexual male response to Affinity 2.0 /

Crosby, Daniel, January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Brigham Young University. Dept. of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 61-66).
6

Sexual orientation, gender & adolescent involvement in delinquency

Soto, Danielle A. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Bowling Green State University, 2007. / Document formatted into pages; contains vi, 62 p. Includes bibliographical references.
7

Sexual orientation : prospects and perspectives of a changing norm in international law / Prospects and perspectives of a changing norm in international law

Andersen, Jacob Strandgaard. January 1999 (has links)
Sexual orientation, especially between males, has historically been met with harsh criminal sanctions. Only in this century has the issue been one of fundamental freedom and private choices. This study analyses the legal history of the concept of choice in sexual orientation in the European Commission of Human Rights (the Commission) and the European Court of Human Right (the Court), and documents the evolution of sexual orientation rights from the 1950s until today specifically focusing on why the human rights protection has changed. Until 1975 the Commission did not consider absolute criminalisation contrary to the right to respect for privacy or as discrimination, but this approach started to change in 1975. A stricter test of what is considered necessary in a democratic society led to the Dudgeon judgement in 1980 where absolute criminalisation of homosexuality was found to be contrary to the right to respect for privacy in the European Convention on Human Rights (the Convention). This judgement has largely been responsible for decriminalisation throughout the Council of Europe member-States. This decriminalisation was limited to private, adult acts that were consensual and this was the norm until 1997. In that year, unequal ages of consent also was found to be contrary to the Convention. The study showed that this evolution was facilitated mainly by a European consensus, based on the legislation of the member-States and expert knowledge. The European consensus doctrine has proven to be a very complex concept, and this study argues that a regional approach to the consensus enquiry is a better solution than the present doctrine, and solves some of the problems it has proven to cause.
8

The development of a scale to measure sexual orientation and an examination of its psychometric properties

Heath, Lance Julien January 2001 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to develop a scale to measure sexual orientation and to examine its psychometric properties. Previous scales were critically examined and compared and the need for a scale which simultaneously measures same and opposite sex responsiveness independently, and accounts for dynamic changes over time, while testing a number of overt and covert dimensions of sexual orientations, was established. A 48-item scale was designed to tap self-reported intensity and frequency of Emotional Attachment, Sexual Fantasy, Sexual Attraction and Sexual Contact towards males and females in the Past, Present and Future. An initial study was conducted with 13 undergraduate university students of both genders, representing a variety of sexual orientations and nationalities, and qualitative feedback was obtained and utilized to make appropriate adjustments and refinements to the scale. The scale was then administered to 133 Rhodes University undergraduate psychology students to obtain quantitative data with regard to its internal structure. The scale was found to have a good internal consistency reliability Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.8106. Existing sub-scales had lower alpha coefficients. Factor analysis, a form of construct validation, was performed and four factors emerged. These had very good internal consistency reliability alpha coefficients: Sexual Responsiveness to Females (0.9894), Sexual Responsiveness to Males (0.9741), Emotional Attachment to Females (0.8403) and Emotional Attachment to Males (0.8372). These factors were further statistically analysed to ascertain how they relate to one another and to the demographics of gender, age, relational status and sexual orientation identity. Future research will need to assess other forms of reliability and validity and focus on larger and more varied samples.
9

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning adolescents : their social experiences and the role of supportive adults in high school

Darwich, Lina Lotfi 11 1900 (has links)
The extant research on the experiences of lesbian/gay, bisexual, and questioning —unsure- (LGBQ) youth shows that they have a lower sense of belonging and safety a tschool, are more likely to be victims of various types of bullying and to skip school, and use drugs and alcohol than their straight peers. Lately, however, a shift in direction towards examining the protective factors, which promote the well being of LGBQ youth, is happening. Extending the emerging research on this shift, the present study investigated the role of supportive adults at school in predicting LGBQ youth sense of safety and belonging. Also, this study examined whether adult support moderated the relationship between sexual orientation victimization and skipping school for LGBQ youth separately. The participants in this study (N = 19,551) were students (grades 8 through 12) enrolled in high schools that took part in a district-wide survey in a large, ethnically and economically diverse urban school district in British Columbia. Results showed that perceptions of adult support played a significant role in predicting the safety and belonging of LGBQ youth. Adult support significantly moderated the relationship between sexual orientation victimization and skipping school for bisexual and questioning youth but not for lesbian/gay youth. The implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed in the last section of this thesis.
10

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning adolescents : their social experiences and the role of supportive adults in high school

Darwich, Lina Lotfi 11 1900 (has links)
The extant research on the experiences of lesbian/gay, bisexual, and questioning —unsure- (LGBQ) youth shows that they have a lower sense of belonging and safety a tschool, are more likely to be victims of various types of bullying and to skip school, and use drugs and alcohol than their straight peers. Lately, however, a shift in direction towards examining the protective factors, which promote the well being of LGBQ youth, is happening. Extending the emerging research on this shift, the present study investigated the role of supportive adults at school in predicting LGBQ youth sense of safety and belonging. Also, this study examined whether adult support moderated the relationship between sexual orientation victimization and skipping school for LGBQ youth separately. The participants in this study (N = 19,551) were students (grades 8 through 12) enrolled in high schools that took part in a district-wide survey in a large, ethnically and economically diverse urban school district in British Columbia. Results showed that perceptions of adult support played a significant role in predicting the safety and belonging of LGBQ youth. Adult support significantly moderated the relationship between sexual orientation victimization and skipping school for bisexual and questioning youth but not for lesbian/gay youth. The implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed in the last section of this thesis.

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