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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

INTEGRATING DESIGN THINKING MODEL AND ITEMS PRIORITIZATION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS INTO REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT IN SCRUM

Unknown Date (has links)
The Agile methodologies have attracted the software development industry's attention due to their capability to overcome the limitations of the traditional software development approaches and to cope with increasing complexity in system development. Scrum is one of the Agile software development processes broadly adopted by industry. Scrum promotes frequent customer involvement and incremental short releases. Despite its popular use, Scrum’s requirements engineering stage is inadequately defined which can lead to increase development time and cost, along with low quality or failure for the end products. This research shows the importance of activity planning of requirements engineering in improving the product quality, cost, and scheduling as well as it points out some drawbacks of Agile practices and available solutions. To improve the Scrum requirements engineering by overcoming its challenges in cases, such as providing a comprehensive understanding of the customer’s needs and addressing the effects of the challenges in other cases, such as frequent changes of requirements, the Design Thinking model is integrated into the Scrum framework in the context of requirements engineering management. The use of the Design Thinking model, in the context of requirements engineering management, is validated through an in-depth scientific study of the IBM Design Thinking framework. In addition, this research presents an Items Prioritization dEcision Support System (IPESS) which is a tool to assist the Product Owners for requirements prioritization. IPESS is built on information collected in the Design Thinking model. The IPESS tool adopts Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique and PageRank algorithm to deal with the specified factors and to achieve the optimal order for requirements items based on the prioritization score. IPESS is a flexible and comprehensive tool that focuses on different important aspects including customer satisfaction and product quality. The IPESS tool is validated through an experiment that was conducted in a real-world project / Includes bibliography. / Dissertation (PhD)--Florida Atlantic University, 2021. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
32

ZFDSS : a formal development support system based on the liberal approach

Zin, Abdullah Mohd January 1993 (has links)
No description available.
33

A model of successful patterns of progress during the integration of software

Lanchbury, Mary Lou A. January 1986 (has links)
Call number: LD2668 .T4 1986 L36 / Master of Science / Computing and Information Sciences
34

A Theory of Shared Understanding for Software Organizations

Aranda Garcia, Jorge 15 February 2011 (has links)
Effective coordination and communication are essential to the success of software organizations, but their study to date has been impaired by theoretical confusion and fragmentation. I articulate a theory that argues that the members of software organizations face a constant struggle to share and negotiate an understanding of their goals, plans, status, and context. This struggle lies at the heart of their coordination and communication problems. The theory proposes an analysis of organizational strategies based on four attributes of interaction that foster the development of shared understanding: synchrony, proximity, proportionality, and maturity. Organizations that have values, structures, and practices which facilitate these qualities find it easier to coordinate and communicate effectively. This argument has serious implications for traditional concepts in our literature. Project lifecycle processes and documentation are poor substitutes for informal but unscalable coordination and communication mechanisms. Practices and tools are valuable to the extent that they enable the development of shared understanding across our criteria. Co-location and group cohesion take advantage of the four criteria and therefore have direct advantages for software teams. Finally, growth is detrimental to the effectiveness of the organization because it hinders the use of small-scale mechanisms and it leads to an undesirable formalization. The theory is supported with empirical evidence collected from five case studies of a wide variety of software organizations, and it has explanatory and predictive power. The thesis links this theory to other current research efforts and shows that it complements and enhances them by providing a more solid theoretical foundation and by reclaiming the relevance of synchronous, proximate, proportionate, and mature interactions in software organizations.
35

A Theory of Shared Understanding for Software Organizations

Aranda Garcia, Jorge 15 February 2011 (has links)
Effective coordination and communication are essential to the success of software organizations, but their study to date has been impaired by theoretical confusion and fragmentation. I articulate a theory that argues that the members of software organizations face a constant struggle to share and negotiate an understanding of their goals, plans, status, and context. This struggle lies at the heart of their coordination and communication problems. The theory proposes an analysis of organizational strategies based on four attributes of interaction that foster the development of shared understanding: synchrony, proximity, proportionality, and maturity. Organizations that have values, structures, and practices which facilitate these qualities find it easier to coordinate and communicate effectively. This argument has serious implications for traditional concepts in our literature. Project lifecycle processes and documentation are poor substitutes for informal but unscalable coordination and communication mechanisms. Practices and tools are valuable to the extent that they enable the development of shared understanding across our criteria. Co-location and group cohesion take advantage of the four criteria and therefore have direct advantages for software teams. Finally, growth is detrimental to the effectiveness of the organization because it hinders the use of small-scale mechanisms and it leads to an undesirable formalization. The theory is supported with empirical evidence collected from five case studies of a wide variety of software organizations, and it has explanatory and predictive power. The thesis links this theory to other current research efforts and shows that it complements and enhances them by providing a more solid theoretical foundation and by reclaiming the relevance of synchronous, proximate, proportionate, and mature interactions in software organizations.
36

Role of Domain Ignorance in Software Development

Mehrotra, Gaurav January 2011 (has links)
Several have reported observations that sometimes ignorance of the domain in a software development project is useful for promoting the elicitation of tacit assumptions and out- of-the-box ideas. This thesis reports work putting the observation to two empirical tests. First, a survey was conducted among software development managers of varying experience to determine what software development activities they thought were at least helped by domain ignorance. Second, transcripts from fourteen interviews of presumably-domain- ignorant immigrants to new software development projects at one large company were examined to determine if the activities performed by those with the smoothest immigrations were activities that are at least helped by domain ignorance. The conclusions are that ignorance plays an important role in software development but there are a lot of other factors that influence immigration smoothness.
37

The effects of Kanban in software development teams : a study of the implementation at Sandvik

Ericsson, Robin, Granlöf, Anna January 2011 (has links)
In software development organizations there is sometimes a need for change. In order to meet continuously increasing demands from their customers, Sandvik IT Services- SITS, at Sandvik in Sweden, required improving the way they worked with software development. Due to issues like a lot of work in progress and lot of simultaneous tasks for individuals in the teams that caused stress, it was almost impossible to address the question of working with improvements. In order to enable the improvement process Kanban was introduced in the software development teams. Kanban for software development is a change method created by David J. Anderson. The purpose of this thesis is twofold. One part is to assess what effects Kanban has had on the software development teams. The other part is to make a documentation of the Kanban implementation process at SITS. The documentation has been made on the basis of both company internal resources and observations of the Kanban implementation process. The effects of Kanban have been researched with an interview survey to the teams that have gone through the Kick start of the Kanban process. The result of the thesis is also twofold. One part of the result is an extensive documentation of the implementation process of Kanban at SITS. The other part is an assessment of the effects that Kanban has had at SITS. The major effects have been that the teams are experiencing less stress, more focus on quality and better customer collaboration. It is also evident is that it takes time for some effects to evolve when implementing Kanban
38

Program analysis with boolean logic solvers

Zaraket, Fadi A., 1974- 29 August 2008 (has links)
Not available
39

Construction software using feature contexts

Hart, Charles Fredrick January 1991 (has links)
No description available.
40

A methodology for refining formal software specification using transformation-based tools

Hsu, Yung-Kao January 1991 (has links)
No description available.

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