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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Psigologiese sterktes binne 'n Afrika-konteks / Alitha Pithey

Pithey, Alitha January 2006 (has links)
This study explored psychological strengths within an African context. Individuals in the North West province of South Africa are confronted with various stressors such as HIV, crime and unemployment, and yet they are found to be functioning successfully in spite of these stressors. The aim of the study was to identify the strengths that help individuals cope in the face of the stressors confronting them. Particular strengths coinciding with Western strengths were investigated, as well as those that appear to be specific to the Setswana culture. The study comprised two phases. Phase 1 involved two focus groups in an attempt to identify broad categories of strengths. Phase 2 involved individual interviews aimed at an in-depth investigation of the said strengths. Participants were mother-tongue speakers of the Setswana language, aged between 20 and 29 years, and exposed to poor socia-economic conditions. Whereas spirituality and a religious orientation amongst participants could be likened to features of Western culture, its manifestation in an African context may differ. In a similar way, the participants' hope and awareness of the future are regarded as strengths within Western culture. Also the sense of humour that prevailed is seen as a strength by Western communities. Wisdom, however, in spite of its positive status in Western terms, has a different meaning in an African context. Strengths that seem to be specific to the Setswana group include social support and a community spirit, which can be regarded as their prime strength. Human skills directed at the well-being of the group also belong to these unique strengths, and so do traditional practices creating a feeling of belonging and participation. While these strengths appear to be unique in Setswana culture, it is not implied that they are totally lacking in Western society, but that they do not enjoy the same priority. Further research is recommended to determine the generalisation of the results. / Thesis (M.A. (Clinical Psychology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007.
2

Psigologiese sterktes binne 'n Afrika-konteks / Alitha Pithey

Pithey, Alitha January 2006 (has links)
This study explored psychological strengths within an African context. Individuals in the North West province of South Africa are confronted with various stressors such as HIV, crime and unemployment, and yet they are found to be functioning successfully in spite of these stressors. The aim of the study was to identify the strengths that help individuals cope in the face of the stressors confronting them. Particular strengths coinciding with Western strengths were investigated, as well as those that appear to be specific to the Setswana culture. The study comprised two phases. Phase 1 involved two focus groups in an attempt to identify broad categories of strengths. Phase 2 involved individual interviews aimed at an in-depth investigation of the said strengths. Participants were mother-tongue speakers of the Setswana language, aged between 20 and 29 years, and exposed to poor socia-economic conditions. Whereas spirituality and a religious orientation amongst participants could be likened to features of Western culture, its manifestation in an African context may differ. In a similar way, the participants' hope and awareness of the future are regarded as strengths within Western culture. Also the sense of humour that prevailed is seen as a strength by Western communities. Wisdom, however, in spite of its positive status in Western terms, has a different meaning in an African context. Strengths that seem to be specific to the Setswana group include social support and a community spirit, which can be regarded as their prime strength. Human skills directed at the well-being of the group also belong to these unique strengths, and so do traditional practices creating a feeling of belonging and participation. While these strengths appear to be unique in Setswana culture, it is not implied that they are totally lacking in Western society, but that they do not enjoy the same priority. Further research is recommended to determine the generalisation of the results. / Thesis (M.A. (Clinical Psychology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007.
3

Strengths in Intersecting Identities: The Experience of Being Black and a Sexual and Gender Minority

Cheperka, Ryan Anne 01 December 2012 (has links)
There has been a lack of inclusion of LGBTQ people of color within the psychological literature. It is important to attend to a number of diverse demographic variables in order to begin to understand a particular group's experience. The unique intersection of demographic variables or identities shapes a person's experience. Thus, the current study was designed to understand the experiences of those who are not typically represented within the literature. Specifically targeted were individuals who had some African American background and were both sexual and gender minorities. The focus of the current study was on life experiences and strengths due to researchers historically focusing on disadvantages of minority groups. This study was a qualitative investigation conducted in order to identify the strengths and influencing factors of strengths of those with multiple minority statuses. Twelve individuals that were at least in part African American and a sexual and gender (or gender identity) minority were interviewed in person. During the interview process participants discussed some of the challenges they faced, the support systems they had, and the various strengths they demonstrated throughout their lives. A grounded theory approach was utilized to analyze the data. The core phenomenon of this study, referred to as the storyline, revolved around participants' development and utilization of strengths, which included the working through various challenges and accessing support within their contexts. Consistent with past research, the development of strengths was impacted by sociocultural/societal factors, community, religion/spirituality, interpersonal relationships, life events, and intrapersonal concerns. Unique strengths included participants' tendency toward intrapersonal growth, perseverance, connections with others, activation of inner coping strategies, and activism.
4

Using Your Strengths

Foley, Virginia P. 01 September 2017 (has links)
No description available.
5

Helping, caring and learning: strengths in new entrants settling into and learning in primary school in post-earthquake Christchurch

Carter, Annabel Louise January 2013 (has links)
Christchurch has experienced a series of over 13,500 earthquakes between September 2010 and January 2012. Some children who have been exposed to earthquakes may experience post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSD) including difficulty concentrating, feeling anxious, restlessness and confusion. Other children may be resilient to the effects of disaster. Western models of resilience relate to a child’s social support and their capacity to cope. The Māori model of wellbeing relates to whanau (family), wairua (spiritual connections), tinana (the physical body) and hinengaro (the mind and emotions). Children’s concepts of helping, caring and learning may provide insight into resilience without introducing the topic of earthquakes into the conversation, which in itself may provoke an episode of stress. Many researchers have studied the effects of earthquakes on children. However, few studies have examined positive outcomes and resilience or listened to the children’s voices. The objective of this study was to listen to the voices of children who experienced the Canterbury earthquake period in order to gain a deeper understanding of the ideas associated resilience. Individual interviews were conducted with 17 five-year-old participants during their first term of primary school. After the interviews, the teacher shared demographic information and reports on the children’s stress and coping. Six children were identified as New Zealand European and eleven children identified as New Zealand Māori. Children had different views of helping, caring and learning. Themes of resilience from Western and Kaupapa Māori models were identified in transcripts of the children's voices and drawings. Māori children voiced more themes of resilience associated with the Western model, and in the Tapa Whā model, Māori children's transcripts were more likely to be inclusive of all four components of well-being. How five-year-old children, having experienced an earthquake disaster during their preschool years, talk or draw pictures about helping, caring and learning can provide insight into resilience, especially in situations where it is not advisable to re-traumatise children by discussing the disaster event. Future research should interview parents/caregivers and whānau to gain further insights. Considering information from both a Western and a Tapa Whā perspective can also provide new insights into resilience in young children. A limitation of this study is that qualitative studies are not always free from a researcher’s interpretation and are, therefore, subjective.
6

Utilisation of mangrove bark extracts in cold-setting wood adhesives

Tahir, Paridah Md January 1995 (has links)
Extraction of mangrove bark with 4.0% aqueous sodium sulfite and 0.4% aqueous sodium carbonate at 100° and 2 hours gives 24-26% yields compared with extraction by water at 70° for 2 hours which gives 21%. The hot water extracts are more acidic (pH 3.6) than is the sulfite extract (pH 5.6); both are reasonably reactive toward formaldehyde (Stiasny number 70.6 using water and 85.4 using aqueous sulfite-carbonate). The <sup>13</sup>C NMR spectra of <I>R. mucronata </I>shows this tannin to have phloroglucinolic A-rings with hydroxy groups at C-5 and C-7 and pyrogallolic B-rings with hydroxy groups at C-3', C-4', and C-5'. The interflavanoid linkages are C-4→C-8 and C-4→C-6. The <sup>13</sup>C NMR spectra also indicate the presence of a considerable amount of carbohydrate which is shown to be mainly rhamnose, glucose, arabinose, and uronic acids. Sulfitation of <I>R. mucronata </I>bark reduces the total carbohydrate and the rhamnose extracted but increases the amount of arabinose and uronic acids. The bark storage period has significant effects on the pH and the reactivity of the aqueous tannin solution. Barks stored for <4 weeks produce higher extraction yields than those stored for > 6 weeks and contain significantly larger amount of reactive tannin and have shorter gel times. The reactivity of bark extracts towards formaldehyde can be controlled either by limiting the duration of bark storage to 4 weeks or by maintaining the aqueous tannin solution at pH <10.0. The aqueous tannin solution from <I>R. mucronata </I>exhibited properties such as viscosity, solubility and tackiness which were superior to those from the <I>R. apiculata </I>extract while the mixed <I>R. mucronata-R. apiculata </I>aqueous tannin solution had properties in between these. These barks could be used singly or together as a source of tannin without the bond strength of the resulting glued joints being significantly affected. The "honeymoon" bonding technique improved the bond strengths of joints made using sulfited tannin but is suitable only for tannin solutions containing > 4% aqueous sodium hydroxide. The viscosity of sulfited tannin adhesives is influenced by (a) the amount of aqueous sodium hydroxide added to the aqueous tannin solution, and (b) the lapse time, i.e. the period between the addition of sodium hydroxide to the aqueous tannin solution and the addition of phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF) resin, hardener, and paraformaldehyde. The present study shows that with the addition of 5% w/w sodium hydroxide and at a curing temperature of 40° the sulfited tannin extracts from the bark of mangrove trees can replace about 50% w/w of the PRF resin in cold-setting wood adhesives with the production of bond strengths comparable to those produced by 100% PRF resin.
7

Exploring resilience in nurses caring for older persons / Petronella Benadé

Benadé, Petronella January 2014 (has links)
Background: A shortage of nurses is experienced in aged care as these nurses experience adverse working conditions. Resilience might empower these nurses to survive, thrive and even flourish. A paucity of research exists regarding resilience in nurses caring for older persons. Objectives: The purpose of this research was to investigate the level of resilience in nurses caring for older persons, and to explore and describe their strengths and coping abilities, in order to formulate recommendations to strengthen resilience in nurses caring for older persons. Method: An explorative, descriptive design with multiple phases was used. An all-inclusive sample of nurses caring for older persons in an urban setting in the North West Province was used. During phase one (sample size n=43) the level of resilience, demographic information and narratives were obtained. During phase two (sample size n=17) focus group interviews were conducted. The quantitative data was analysed using descriptive statistics and the qualitative data using content analysis. Results: The participants had a moderately high to high level of resilience. Participants did experience adverse working circumstances and they needed resilience due to a need for balance, the emotional nature of the work, work ethics and the work environment. Nurses caring for older persons use personal, professional, contextual and spiritual strengths to handle adverse working conditions. Conclusion: Recommendations to strengthen resilience in nurses caring for older persons were formulated in phase three of the research, focusing on strengthening nurses‟ personal, professional, contextual and spiritual strengths in order that they can handle adverse workplace conditions. / MCur, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2014
8

Exploring resilience in nurses caring for older persons / Petronella Benadé

Benadé, Petronella January 2014 (has links)
Background: A shortage of nurses is experienced in aged care as these nurses experience adverse working conditions. Resilience might empower these nurses to survive, thrive and even flourish. A paucity of research exists regarding resilience in nurses caring for older persons. Objectives: The purpose of this research was to investigate the level of resilience in nurses caring for older persons, and to explore and describe their strengths and coping abilities, in order to formulate recommendations to strengthen resilience in nurses caring for older persons. Method: An explorative, descriptive design with multiple phases was used. An all-inclusive sample of nurses caring for older persons in an urban setting in the North West Province was used. During phase one (sample size n=43) the level of resilience, demographic information and narratives were obtained. During phase two (sample size n=17) focus group interviews were conducted. The quantitative data was analysed using descriptive statistics and the qualitative data using content analysis. Results: The participants had a moderately high to high level of resilience. Participants did experience adverse working circumstances and they needed resilience due to a need for balance, the emotional nature of the work, work ethics and the work environment. Nurses caring for older persons use personal, professional, contextual and spiritual strengths to handle adverse working conditions. Conclusion: Recommendations to strengthen resilience in nurses caring for older persons were formulated in phase three of the research, focusing on strengthening nurses‟ personal, professional, contextual and spiritual strengths in order that they can handle adverse workplace conditions. / MCur, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2014
9

Translating Online Positive Psychology Interventions to Sexual and Gender Minorities: A Systematic Review

Job, Sarah A., Williams, Stacey L. 01 January 2020 (has links)
Sexual and gender minorities (SGM) often face worse health outcomes in comparison with their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts. Positive psychology interventions (PPIs) have the potential to improve these outcomes. In this article we review 130 articles containing online positive psychology interventions and evaluate them based on effect size, length of follow-up, and sample characteristics. Based on these findings applied to the psychological mediation framework (Hatzenbuehler, 2009), we recommend the following interventions be tested in SGM samples: self-compassion, optimism, love, forgiveness, humor, and spirituality. Future research that tailors existing positive psychology interventions to the lived experiences of SGM individuals could ameliorate health disparities.
10

Theoretical and Experimental Linewidth Parameters in the Rotational Spectrum of Nitrogen Dioxide

Moazzen-Ahmadi, Mohamad Nasser 12 1900 (has links)
Contributions to the second order collision efficiency function S ⁽²⁾ (b), used in semiclassical perturbation approaches to pressure broadening of microwave and infrared spectra, due to several leading terms, dipole and quadrupole components, in the expansion of the intermolecular interaction energy are derived by method of irreducible spherical tensor operators for molecules of arbitrary symmetry. Results are given explicitly in terms of dipole and quadrupole line strengths. General expressions for dipole moment line strength in the asymmetric rotor basis as well as quadrupole moment line strength for the special case of molecules with two independent quadrupole moment components are derived. Computer programs for calculating linewidth parameters in the rotational spectrum of ¹⁴NO₂ based on Anderson and Murphy and Boggs theories are presented.

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