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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A comparative study of the role of donors in three telecentre projects in Africa.

Chisa, Ken Dennis. January 2006 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of donors in the establishment, implementation and sustainability of donor-funded telecentres in Africa. This was achieved by looking at success factors and reasons of failure at three donor-funded telecentres across three countries on the continent. The projects in question were Nakaseke Telecentre in Uganda, Bhamshela Telecentre in South Africa and the Malawi Rural Telecentre Project (MRTP) which, in the end, was never implemented in Malawi. To achieve the objectives of the study, both secondary and primary sources of data were used. The population of the study consisted of senior officers within the organisations that pledged financial and technical support for the MR TP and those that funded the Bhamshela and Nakaseke Telecentres. However, since there was no response from the donors of the Nakaseke Telecentre, all the data relating to the case was solely sourced from the literature (both print and on-line). Data collected dealt with various aspects of telecentre establishment, implementation and sustainability. The study found that Africa depends heavily on external finance and expertise to establish and implement telecentres due to financial incapacity, lack of expertise and poor infrastructure. The various experiences from the three cases have also demonstrated that donors cannot apply a single model of implementation uniformly across the region due to various political and socio-economic factors existing in different areas of the continent. Finally, the study highlighted the fact that if project sustainability is to be achieved, donors need to constantly improve the training and management component of telecentres. Therefore, rather than trying to draw a standard blueprint for project success, donors need to be ingenious and learn from shared experiences in the field, creatively adapting the solutions that work in one context to others. In conclusion, the findings identified in the present study potentially open up a window for the possibility of future research in terms of the success of donor-funded telecentres in Africa. / Thesis (MIS)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2006.
2

The information needs and information seeking behaviour of adult diabetic patients at Addington Hospital, Durban.

Naidoo, Prabavathy. January 2012 (has links)
Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease associated with high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. (The three types of diabetes are: Type 1 diabetes which is onset in juveniles and is characterised by deficient insulin production and the patient requires daily administration of insulin; Gestational diabetes is onset and first detected during pregnancy and Type 2 diabetes is typically found in adults who are 40 years and over and results from the body's ineffective use of insulin). Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease that can be prevented and managed by following a particular eating plan, exercising correctly and by the correct administration of medication. With relevant knowledge, lifestyle changes and information, type 2 diabetic patients can improve and manage their condition effectively. Hence information provision is especially important for the management of diabetes. The current study investigated the information needs and information seeking behaviour of adult type 2 diabetic patients at Addington Hospital in Durban. The study was conducted on the patients who attend the Diabetic Clinic at the Hospital. A better understanding of the information needs and information seeking behaviour of diabetic patients can contribute to their successful management of diabetes. Longo's 2010, Health Information Model provided the conceptual framework for the study. The study adopted both a quantitative and qualitative approach. Both methodologies were used to assist in gaining an insight into the research. It was envisaged that the use of both methodologies would enhance and increase the validity and reliability of the data collected. A population of 69 adult patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes were individually interviewed. The healthcare professionals, which included the Medical Officer and four nursing staff at the Diabetic Clinic and the hospital's diabetic Dietician, completed the self-administered questionnaires. The data was entered into a computer and analysed using SPSS. The data was analysed in terms of frequency of results and presented in the form of tables, bar graphs or pie charts. Four themes emerged from the study: (1) Reliance on the diabetic doctor for diabetic education; (2) the active and passive patterns of information seeking; (3) patients' fear of the consequences of diabetes; and (4) the value of the Department of Health's and the Dietician's packaged information. The results of the study indicated that certain factors influenced the patients' decisions about their diabetes self-management. Their current needs influenced their need to seek out information and in most instances they sought this information out from the diabetic doctor. They could not afford the recommended foods for diabetics and besides obtaining their information from the pamphlets and hand-outs provided by the hospital, they obtained their information from traditional mass media. The study concluded that the patients relied heavily on the information provided by the doctor, the dietician and the hand-outs and pamphlets that are available at the clinic. Without an understanding of the effects of information on type 2 diabetes patients, we have an incomplete picture of how information changes the patients' behaviour, which is of primary concern in healthcare information. The study therefore recommended that future research should investigate the effects information has on type 2 diabetes patients and their behaviour. Recommendations that were drawn from the conclusions of the study were that the Diabetic Clinic and Hospital should consider approaching the South African Diabetes Association (SADA) with regard to volunteering their services and facilities to the patients at the hospital. The Clinic should also consider playing a video/dvd recording on diabetes in the patient waiting room. The Diabetic Clinic should also consider inviting a podiatrist to speak to the patients about foot care. / Thesis (M.I.S.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2012.
3

The significance of records management to fostering accountability in the public service reform programme of Tanzania.

Ndenje-Sichalwe, Esther. January 2010 (has links)
This study investigated the extent to which records management practices fostered accountability in the Public Service Reform Programme (PSRP) in some government ministries in Tanzania. The effective implementation of the PSRP depends largely on many factors, the most important of which is the proper and well organized methods of managing public records. It is essential for government ministries to ensure that records are properly managed at every stage of the records life cycle, so that the information they contain can provide evidence of transactions and the efficient and effective provision of service to the public. The records life cycle model through its phases formed the theoretical foundation of the study. A mixed methods research approach was adopted and quantitative approach was used as a dominant paradigm. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered simultaneously during a single phase of data collection. Data was collected through a questionnaire administered to registry personnel from the government ministries, interviews with senior ministerial officials, National Archives personnel from the Records and Archives Management Department (RAMD) and staff from Tanzania Public Service College. The overall response rate from the questionnaire was 67%. An observation checklist was further used to verify data obtained from the questionnaire and interviews. Quantitative data was analyzed using the SPSS statistical package version 15.0 and the results of the study are presented in the form of figures, tables and text, while qualitative data from interviews was content analyzed and in some instances presented in tabular form. The findings of the study indicated that records in some government ministries in Tanzania were not properly managed to foster accountability in the implementation of the PSRP. The study established that although the introduction of the PSRP has resulted in some efforts in reforming records management practices in the government ministries, current records management in the government ministries was still weak, thus fostering accountability in the PSRP would be difficult. The findings of the study revealed a lack of registry mission statements, records management policy and dedicated budgets for registry sections. The majority of government registries in Tanzania lacked records retention schedules and systematic disposal of records resulting in heavy congestion of records and poor retrieval of information. Further, disaster preparedness and security control for records and archives did not form a significant part of the records management activities in the government ministries of Tanzania. On the extent of the use of computer applications in the management of records, the findings indicated the existence of computers in some registries but few computers were used to create records. National Archives and registry personnel faced challenges in the management of electronic records. The study established that National Archives personnel had not undertaken surveys to determine the number of electronic records created in the ministries. The findings of the study showed that although registry personnel received professional records management advice from the National Archives personnel, they did not implement the advice. The findings of the study revealed that the levels of skills and training of registry personnel was relatively low. The majority of registry personnel had not attended courses to update their knowledge and skills. To foster accountability in the public sector, the major recommendation of the study was the restructuring of records management systems. The restructuring should include enacting records management policies in order to accommodate the changes brought about by technology to enhance the proper management of records and effective implementation of the PSRP. The study recommends that government ministries should allocate dedicated budgets for registries. A budget should make provision for registry supplies and equipment and should ensure that registry personnel are provided with formal training in records management so as to develop their levels of skills and training. In order to ensure reliability, integrity, authenticity and long-term preservation of electronic records in support of the requirements of good government and fostering accountability, the study recommended for the integrated approach to records management to be considered in order to incorporate records in both paper and electronic formats. Further, the National Archives should undertake a survey at least annually, to determine the number of electronic records created in the government ministries. It is recommended that the government should update Records and Archives Management Act No.3 of 2002 to reflect the management of electronic records. National Archives should develop records retention and disposition schedules and records should be disposed of regularly in order to create more space for the current records, thus enhancing accountability in the implementation of the PSRP. The study recommends that professional records management advice should be provided on a regular and continuing basis. The National Archives should work closely with the President’s Office-Public Service Management to organize training for senior ministerial officials in order to create awareness regarding the importance of managing records as a strategic resource and its effectiveness in fostering accountability in the implementation of the public service reform programme. The setting up of standards and guidelines on the training of registry personnel is also necessary in order to enhance their status and skills. Enhancing their status and skills would be important for the proper management of records throughout their life cycle to foster accountability in the effective implementation of the PSRP. The study further recommended several issues which could be the subject of further investigation by other researchers in the field, including investigating the current records management practices in Judiciary, Parliament and local government authorities in Tanzania, a study to establish the levels of e-records readiness and e-government in the public sector in Tanzania, and a study to investigate the training of National Archives personnel in order to establish their levels of education and how they impact on the management of records in the government ministries. Furthermore, a study should be conducted to establish the role of records management in addressing corruption, fraud and maladministration in the public sector of Tanzania. A study to assess records management performance in the public sector using international standards such as ISO 15489 Information and Documentation-Records Management, General International Standard Archival Description (ISAD(G)), ISO/DIS 11799 Document Storage Requirements for Archive and Library Materials and ISO 11108: 1996 Information and Documentation-Paper for Archival Documents, is also important. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2010.
4

The significance of records management to fostering accountability in the public service reform programme of Tanzania.

Ndenje-Sichalwe, Esther. January 2010 (has links)
This study investigated the extent to which records management practices fostered accountability in the Public Service Reform Programme (PSRP) in some government ministries in Tanzania. The effective implementation of the PSRP depends largely on many factors, the most important of which is the proper and well organized methods of managing public records. It is essential for government ministries to ensure that records are properly managed at every stage of the records life cycle, so that the information they contain can provide evidence of transactions and the efficient and effective provision of service to the public. The records life cycle model through its phases formed the theoretical foundation of the study. A mixed methods research approach was adopted and quantitative approach was used as a dominant paradigm. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered simultaneously during a single phase of data collection. Data was collected through a questionnaire administered to registry personnel from the government ministries, interviews with senior ministerial officials, National Archives personnel from the Records and Archives Management Department (RAMD) and staff from Tanzania Public Service College. The overall response rate from the questionnaire was 67%. An observation checklist was further used to verify data obtained from the questionnaire and interviews. Quantitative data was analyzed using the SPSS statistical package version 15.0 and the results of the study are presented in the form of figures, tables and text, while qualitative data from interviews was content analyzed and in some instances presented in tabular form. The findings of the study indicated that records in some government ministries in Tanzania were not properly managed to foster accountability in the implementation of the PSRP. The study established that although the introduction of the PSRP has resulted in some efforts in reforming records management practices in the government ministries, current records management in the government ministries was still weak, thus fostering accountability in the PSRP would be difficult. The findings of the study revealed a lack of registry mission statements, records management policy and dedicated budgets for v registry sections. The majority of government registries in Tanzania lacked records retention schedules and systematic disposal of records resulting in heavy congestion of records and poor retrieval of information. Further, disaster preparedness and security control for records and archives did not form a significant part of the records management activities in the government ministries of Tanzania. On the extent of the use of computer applications in the management of records, the findings indicated the existence of computers in some registries but few computers were used to create records. National Archives and registry personnel faced challenges in the management of electronic records. The study established that National Archives personnel had not undertaken surveys to determine the number of electronic records created in the ministries. The findings of the study showed that although registry personnel received professional records management advice from the National Archives personnel, they did not implement the advice. The findings of the study revealed that the levels of skills and training of registry personnel was relatively low. The majority of registry personnel had not attended courses to update their knowledge and skills. To foster accountability in the public sector, the major recommendation of the study was the restructuring of records management systems. The restructuring should include enacting records management policies in order to accommodate the changes brought about by technology to enhance the proper management of records and effective implementation of the PSRP. The study recommends that government ministries should allocate dedicated budgets for registries. A budget should make provision for registry supplies and equipment and should ensure that registry personnel are provided with formal training in records management so as to develop their levels of skills and training. In order to ensure reliability, integrity, authenticity and long-term preservation of electronic records in support of the requirements of good government and fostering accountability, the study recommended for the integrated approach to records management to be considered in order to incorporate records in both paper and electronic formats. Further, the National Archives should undertake a survey at least annually, to determine the number of electronic records created in the government vi ministries. It is recommended that the government should update Records and Archives Management Act No.3 of 2002 to reflect the management of electronic records. National Archives should develop records retention and disposition schedules and records should be disposed of regularly in order to create more space for the current records, thus enhancing accountability in the implementation of the PSRP. The study recommends that professional records management advice should be provided on a regular and continuing basis. The National Archives should work closely with the President’s Office-Public Service Management to organize training for senior ministerial officials in order to create awareness regarding the importance of managing records as a strategic resource and its effectiveness in fostering accountability in the implementation of the public service reform programme. The setting up of standards and guidelines on the training of registry personnel is also necessary in order to enhance their status and skills. Enhancing their status and skills would be important for the proper management of records throughout their life cycle to foster accountability in the effective implementation of the PSRP. The study further recommended several issues which could be the subject of further investigation by other researchers in the field, including investigating the current records management practices in Judiciary, Parliament and local government authorities in Tanzania, a study to establish the levels of e-records readiness and e-government in the public sector in Tanzania, and a study to investigate the training of National Archives personnel in order to establish their levels of education and how they impact on the management of records in the government ministries. Furthermore, a study should be conducted to establish the role of records management in addressing corruption, fraud and maladministration in the public sector of Tanzania. A study to assess records management performance in the public sector using international standards such as ISO 15489 Information and Documentation-Records Management, General International Standard Archival Description (ISAD(G)), ISO/DIS 11799 Document Storage Requirements for Archive and Library Materials and ISO 11108: 1996 Information and Documentation-Paper for Archival Documents, is also important. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2010.
5

The potential of Library 2.0 for research libraries in Kenya.

Kwanya, Tom Joseph Mboya. January 2011 (has links)
The environment in which libraries currently operate has changed drastically. For instance, the emergence of new information and communication technologies, exemplified by the Internet, has changed the way people seek information, communicate and collaborate. Thus, modern library users have embraced new information seeking behaviour as well as expectations for better usability, faster response times to needs, and constant access to unrestricted library services. As libraries struggle to cope with these changes and user expectations, some library users are already reducing their levels of usage, preferring to “Google” than visit a physical library. Similarly, library circulation statistics indicate that the usage of the traditional services and products is decreasing steadily while the usage of electronic resources and services is increasing. Critically, most users do not presently perceive the library as the first or only stop for information. Libraries are therefore struggling to attract new users and retain the existing ones. Research libraries in Kenya, due to their vision and mission as well as the heightened expectations of the users, are under immense pressure to change. Indeed, a number of them are already changing by introducing new services facilitated by the emerging Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tools. However, the services and products are still limited in scope and depth because they have been patterned after the conventional services. One of the greatest predicaments the research libraries currently face is how to model and manage this change. This study investigated the potential of the Library 2.0 model of library service in facilitating the research libraries in Kenya to respond more closely to the emerging user needs and expectations. The study employed interpretive qualitative research methodology and multiple case studies to investigate the current status of research libraries in Kenya and their challenges in meeting the dynamic needs of the researchers. Furthermore, the study investigated the extent of application and use of the Library 2.0 model. Data was collected from five case study sites – African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF), International Centre for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya Agricultural Research Institution (KARI) and Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) – through interviews of researchers and librarians; focus group discussions with researchers and librarians; Social Network Analysis; direct observations; and mystery shopping. The data was analyzed using content analysis, conversation analysis, descriptive/interpretive techniques (Heideggarian hermeneutics) and Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) such as Nvivo and UCINET. The findings of this study show that most research libraries in Kenya do not have documented vision, mission or strategic plans; are underfunded and understaffed; hold inadequate collections in equally inadequate physical spaces; largely apply the traditional library service model; face negative internal politics and unfavourable organizational structures; and lack mutually beneficial linkages. The findings also indicate that the research libraries in Kenya are underutilized and barely meet the needs of the researchers in their current status. The findings of this study also suggest that the Library 2.0 model holds great potential to enable the libraries to take their services and products everywhere the researchers are; remove the barriers to accessing library services; facilitate and direct constant purposeful change in their services and how they are delivered; harness the active participation of the users; retain the new breed of users (Patrons 2.0); and remain user-centred. Based on the findings, the researcher recommends that the librarians who head research libraries should hold PhD degrees to enable them to participate effectively in institutional decision-making; the research libraries should establish close ties with academic libraries supporting programmes related to their research interests; the research libraries should form a specialized consortium and association to serve their unique interests; the research libraries should consider grey literature as an important source of research information and develop strategies of managing it; and schools of librarianship should introduce courses on ICTs, models of library service, marketing and facilitation (training) to equip the students with the skills needed to meet the emerging demands on librarians. The researcher also proposes a Research Library 2.0 meme map which is an adaption of the Library 2.0 meme map. The former map is different from latter in that it is specific to research libraries and recognizes the fact that an effective Research Library 2.0 requires the active interaction of enhanced collection (Collection 2.0), library physical space (Physical Space 2.0), researchers (Researcher 2.0) and librarians (Librarian 2.0) to thrive. The researcher also recommends that further research be conducted to investigate the potential of the Library 2.0 model for all the other library typologies in Kenya and Africa; explore the influence of gender on librarianship in Africa; investigate the application of Social Network Analysis in library and information research; and develop an inventory of all types of libraries in Kenya. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2011.
6

A comparative study of interlibrary loan functions and the development of a model interlibrary loan network among academic libraries in Saudi Arabia.

Siddiqui, Moid Ahmad January 1995 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to survey and analyse the condition of the present system of academic libraries, defined in this study as the seven university libraries, in Saudi Arabia; determine the perceptions of academic libraries in Saudi Arabia toward cooperation and design a model interlibrary loan network (ILLN) for the academic libraries of Saudi Arabia.............A document review, questionnaire survey and structured interview were used for data collection......Major findings are that six out of seven libraries do not meet the ACRL standards in respect of collections....all seven inducated that they cooperated with all other academic libraries but did not borrow / lend materials or only occasionally. ............This study proposed that an ILLN that will both be a distributed and centralized network in which academic libraries will coordinate and communicate directly with each other......
7

The satisfaction of post-graduate education students with library services at the University of Transkei.

Ndudane, Ruth Zonke. January 1999 (has links)
As academic libraries continue to evolve as service organizations, they should focus on their users. This calls for a better understanding of the specific needs of library users in order to provide the appropriate type and level of service that meets those needs. The overriding goal will be user satisfaction. In this study, a survey was used to determine the levels of satisfaction of post-graduate education students with library services at the University of Transkei. A questionnaire was administered to 100 post-graduate education students registered in 1998 of which 57 responded. The most important finding that emerged from the analysis of the responses was that the majority of the respondents were in general satisfied with the library services offered at UNITRA. However, dissatisfaction was expressed by at least twenty percent of respondents with noise levels, opening hours, lack of photocopiers, the accuracy of the library catalogue, materials being in their correct place, inefficient staff and interloans. It was found that respondents were reluctant to commit themselves to expressing high levels of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Suggestions made by respondents included computerization and the need for staff training. Recommendations based on the findings were then made followed by suggestions for further research. / Thesis (M.A.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1999.
8

Collection development and use of non-book materials in university libraries in South Africa.

Ntuli, Nomaxabiso Claribel. January 1999 (has links)
Non-book materials have a unique role to play in university libraries of South Africa, as they re-inforce what has been learnt and facilitate presentation of subject matter to fulfil the needs of teaching and learning of institutions. The key problem of the study was that non-book materials though very important as sources of information like books, appear to be little or not used in South African university libraries. This may be caused by unclear policy presented in formal or informal collection development policies. The general aim of the study was to find out collection development practices, policies and use of non-book materials in South African university libraries. To this end the specific objectives were: To find out how non-book materials in university libraries are collected and maintained as part of teaching, learning and research. To get some understanding on the policies and patterns the university libraries follow in the development of non-book materials. To find out the manner in which non-book materials are funded and acquired. To find out the extent to which library orientation, instruction and user education cover non-book materials. The study therefore examined the collection development and usage of nonbook materials in university libraries of South Africa. All the South African university libraries except University of Zululand where the researcher works and is the AV-librarian were included in the study. The major method of study chosen was the survey method and the questionnaire was used for data collection. The methods of analysis used were the univariate and bi-variate methods and the basic type of statistics, the descriptive statistics. Libraries surveyed showed that they favoured non-book materials, and above all they do have the most NBM that are available in all formats. The study guided the researcher in making the following recommendations: The need for improvement of the NBM information services in libraries. That clear policies, whether written or not, for selection and acquisition of NBM be reviewed in libraries in South Africa. The role of NBM specialist is important and needs to be redressed. That the academic staff, library staff and students work together as a team and devise a program of library user education integrated with curriculum. / Thesis (M.I.S.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1999.
9

The application of microcomputer technology for information retrieval in library resource centres of Indian secondary schools in South Africa.

Govender, Gopal. January 1990 (has links)
Abstract available in pdf file.
10

Web-based information behavior of high school learners in Oshana region, Namibia.

Shiweda, Tertu Ponhele. 22 May 2014 (has links)
The aim of this study was to investigate the Web-based information behaviour of high school learners in Oshana Region in Namibia. The study also considerd the challenges faced by learners when searching the Web for information. For many years in the history of library and information services, print-based information had been the main source of information. However, since the emergence of the Internet and its rapid development, the Internet has provided an almost unlimited pool of Web-based resources, thus becoming a powerful source of information. The Web is now established as the main medium for the wide dissemination of information across the Internet. Within the academic context learners throughout the world are able to retrieve seemingly endless volumes of information across all disciplines and from all over the globe. It is therefore important to study the behavior of young people in relation to Web-based information because it is today one of their most important sources of knowledge. The findings of this study could assist in curriculum design, especially with regard to Basic Information Science (a subject offered in schools in Namibia), which incorporates information literacy and information-seeking skills development. In addition the study provides some insight into the information and computer literacy levels of learners and proposes ways of responding to these, thus assisting in further developing these important literacies. The study was guided by Wilson’s (1999) model of information behaviour. The model attempts to describe an information-seeking activity and suggests relationships among stages in information-seeking behaviour. The study has adopted a quantitative approach as its methodology. Data from a total of 160 respondents was collected using a questionnaire that consisted of both open ended and closed questions. The study’s research questions investigate how, where and when do Grade 12 learners access the Internet, for what purposes do Grade 12 learners use the Web when looking for information, how do Grade 12 learners search for information on the Web, what are the Web information searching skills of Grade 12 learners, what sources of information on the Web do Grade 12 learners use, how do Grade 12 learners evaluate and use information found on the Web, and what are the challenges faced by Grade 12 learners when searching the Web for information. The survey concentrated on Matric learners (grade 12) from Mweshipandeka HS and Gabriel Taapopi SSS in the Oshana region of Namibia. The results were analysed using SPSS as a tool for data analysis. An interpretation of the findings of this study shows that learners Web-searching skills are inadequate. Overall, there was a high level of familiarity with various Web-information sources such as search engines, although users limited themselves mainly to a few sources such as the search engines Google and Yahoo and the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Learners were not aware of Google's limitations and of the existence of academic, often library-funded, information sources such as databases and electronic journals. The present study found strong indications that grade 12 learners lack information-evaluation skills as well as acknowledgement skills and that they are not aware of what constitutes plagiarism. This appears to be a result of poor training in schools. However, the status of learner’s access to the Internet is good. Both schools involved in this study provide learners with physical access to the Internet. / Thesis (M.I.S.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2013.

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