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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The development of a work values questionnaire

Engelbrecht, Petronella Maria 03 November 2008 (has links)
D.Litt. et Phil. / The shift from a modern to a postmodern culture is reverberating through the field of career psychology. This results in a rejection of the grandnarrative of the objective career and a shift to the exploration of multiple subjective realities regarding the world of work. A description of three aspects, namely, sensitivity towards diversity, the notion of the subjective self and the challenge to the general paradigm of progress, illuminate blind spots in modern career psychology. These aspects present a conceptual base for thinking on postmodern career psychology. The career psychologist’s role is determined by processes of decision making and attributing meaning. An exploration and clarification of values is useful during these processes. The aim of this study is to formulate and investigate the validity of a structure of work values during an early stage of career process by means of developing a Work Values Questionnaire. A theoretical discussion of the constructs of values and more specifically work values, presents a basis for developing items for the Work Values Questionnaire. The purpose of this theoretical description is operational. In accordance with the postmodern incrudibility towards the grandnarrative no attempt is made to present a unified value or work values theory. The work of Buchholz and Hofstede forms the basis for a description of work values. From this theoretical basis five work value scales, namely, Collectivism, Uncertainty Avoidance, Power Distance, Individualism and Humanist Values were postulated. 93 items representing these scales were written and administered on 1365 South African participants. The responses of 637 participants were used to perform an exploratory factor analysis on the 93 items. The responses of the remaining 717 participants were used to perform confirmatory factor analysis of the obtained empirical structure. Five factors were identified and described in the first group by means of exploratory factor analysis. Based on these results, a postulated model was generated and tested with the Group Two data. The fit between the model and the data was explored by means of the chi-square statistic, the Goodness of Fit Index, the Adjusted Goodness of Fit Index and the Steiger Lind Root Mean Square Error of Approximation Index. The results indicate a satisfactory fit between the postulated model and the data. Based on the outcome of the exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, these five factors can be described as iv empirically well defined. The factors also appear to represent meaningful psychological constructs. It is therefore stated that the validity of a structure of work values is supported. The five constructs are Group Involvement, Uncertainty Tolerance, Structured Work, Visible Success, as well as, Progressive Advancement and Success. The results of this exploration can be utilised in further research aimed at the development of a Work Values Questionnaire.
2

Behavioral Intention as a Function of Value Attitude Inconsistency and Environmental Salience

Gamson, Andrew 01 January 1986 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
3

Life values of Westernized black professionals in Soweto

Pitso-Motlabane, Maleshoane Ernestina 07 October 2014 (has links)
M.A. (Psychology) / Please refer to full text to view abstract
4

Exploring the possibility of an Ubuntu-based political philosophy

Furman, Katherine Elizabeth January 2013 (has links)
It is typically said that there are two questions that political philosophy seeks to address: ‘who gets what?’ and ‘who decides on who gets what?’ South Africa, along with much of the rest of the world, has answered the second question badly and currently ranks as one of the world’s most unequal societies. Counter-intuitively, South Africa maintains a social-political order that (re)produces this inequality along with great enthusiasm for ubuntu, an African ethic that at a minimum requires that we treat each other humanely. However, due to the view that ubuntu has been co-opted in support of South Africa’s unjust system, ubuntu has largely been ignored by radical thinkers. The aim of this thesis is therefore to explore the possibility of an ubuntu-based political philosophy, with the core assumption that political philosophy is rooted in ethical theory. Three tasks are therefore undertaken in this thesis. Firstly, ubuntu is articulated as an ethic. Secondly, it is compared to similar Western ethical theories in order to determine if there are distinguishing characteristics that make ubuntu a more appropriate founding ethic for South African political philosophy. Finally, whether ubuntu can find real-world applicability will be assessed by looking at the way ubuntu has been used in the law

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