• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 161
  • 36
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 297
  • 297
  • 130
  • 71
  • 61
  • 42
  • 42
  • 36
  • 30
  • 30
  • 28
  • 27
  • 26
  • 26
  • 25
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Fitting into America : the status of developmental assets and sources of positive youth development among young adult plus-size models /

Silverman, Robyn J. Abeles. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Tufts University, 2004. / Adviser: Richard M. Lerner. Submitted to the Dept. of Applied Child Development. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 211-250). Access restricted to members of the Tufts University community. Also available via the World Wide Web;
12

A QUALITATIVE UNDERSTANDING OF GENDER-RESPONSIVE YOUTH PROGRAMMING WITHIN THE GIRLS ROCK CAMP ALLIANCE

Amosu, Seyi 01 September 2020 (has links)
This study documented the gender-responsive youth programing strategies within Girls Rock camps using grounded theory methodology. Experiencing gender oppression is a stressor that creates an increased risk for mental and physical health concerns for gender-marginalized people. The risks for mental illnesses, because of gender-based oppression, is compounded when an individual holds additional marginalized statuses (e.g., age, race, ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, ability status, etc.; APA, 2007). Gender bias has also been shown to negatively impact young people’s self-esteem, academic achievement, and vocational aspirations (Kamsler, 1992). Given this negative impact of gender bias, it is important to address gender related discrimination early in adolescents’ lives to mitigate the harmful ramifications of living in a sexist society. Gender-responsive youth programs are extracurricular, community-based organizations that incorporate the specific concerns of girls and gender non-conforming youth into organizational policies, practices, and activities. Girls Rock is a music-based, gender-responsive youth program that teaches young people empowerment through music. The resulting grounded theory model of the Girls Rock Camp Alliance positions authentic relationships as the active ingredient that makes Girls Rock camps effective worldwide. This model can be used to understand the components of a successful Girls Rock camp and can be adapted to gender-responsive youth programs of any discipline.
13

Towards culturally relevant 4-H agriculture programming for urban youth: Identifying potential design principles and outcomes

Wilson, Jordan Latrice 11 February 2022 (has links)
Historical context of African Americans within agriculture has produced negative perceptions of agriculture within African American populations today. Furthermore, many minority youth who reside in urban areas are disconnected from agriculture because of lack of access, limiting contact to food production systems to consumption. In rural areas that are dedicated to agriculture and farming, youth can witness agricultural principles daily and many of them have lived experiences with agriculture. Non-formal educational programming such as 4-H is beneficial for exposing and including urban youth into agricultural educational programming. 4-H programs can connect with schools, after school programs and other youth organizations in urban areas to reach youth but the needs of this audience must be attended to. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand design principles that can be beneficial in increasing urban youth participation in 4-H agricultural programming while also utilizing culturally relevant pedagogy facets within 4-H programming. Seven 4-H agents were interviewed with individual and focus group interviews. Descriptive coding, in-vivo coding, and value coding methods were utilized during first cycle coding. Literature from Gloria Ladson-Billing's theory of culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) was utilized to frame the research questions, a priori table, and interview guides in the study. Findings from the study indicated that CRP facets were emerging in 4-H programming and within 4-H agents. Although, CRP facets are emergent, design principles for 4-H programs must be developed to ensure issues such as equity, diversity, and inclusion is represented throughout all 4-H programs. / Master of Science in Life Sciences / Utilizing 4-H programming to connect urban youth to agriculture education is an important concern for 4-H agents. Urban youth are disconnected from agriculture unlike rural youth. Agricultural educational programs can be embedded into urban communities to expose youth to agriculture. Non-formal educational programs such as 4-H are intended to reach all youth, providing youth opportunities to participate in STEM, robotics, agricultural, and sport activities. Although 4-H is a national program it does not have strong presence in many urban communities. Design principles of 4-H programming can be challenged and examined to assess and develop strategies that are useful in engaging urban youth in programming. Acknowledging 4-H programs as non-traditional for urban youth because of the historical context of oppression between African Americans and agriculture is important for change. Educational spaces where youth cultures are considered when developing programming are important. Culturally relevant pedagogy is a framework that focuses on being culturally relevant in educational spaces by considering how teachers interact with students. The framework challenges teacher's ability to consider academic success, youth culture, and critical consciousness within instruction. This framework is important for youth being at the center of educational efforts for their success. Agents participated in two interviews one individual and one focus group. The interviews focused on agent experiences and opinions about 4-H programming efforts to successfully engage urban youth, agent strategies, and success and failures of processes within 4-H programming. Findings indicated that facets of CRP are emergent in 4-H programming, and agents discussed new design principles for successful engagement of urban youth.
14

Asset building for communities and youth

Fouch, Jessica January 1900 (has links)
Master of Regional and Community Planning / Department of Landscape Architecture/Regional and Community Planning / John W. Keller / This report reviews asset building for communities to promote youth healthy development. It addresses a comprehensive approach to youth development by engaging all members and sectors of a community. Bellevue, Washington is a community nationally recognized for its collective approach to tackling issues faced by their youth. The Search Institute’s 40 Developmental Assets 1997 Survey showed Bellevue youth possessed less than 50% of the developmental assets necessary to become responsible adults. Since receiving these results, Bellevue has continued working to improve the lives of youth in their community by utilizing the knowledge and resources of community members, organizations, and institutions. For this report, Bellevue’s collective engagement was analyzed to identify which developmental assets youth could obtain through participation, support, and engagement in various community sectors. Bellevue was used as a case study for an asset building community for youth, to determine what makes a great community for youth to live and thrive.
15

Identifying High Quality Youth Programs: An Introduction

Borden, Lynne, Stuart, Marta Elva, Tessman, Darcy, Waits, Juanita O'Campo, Lauxman, Lisa, Strickland, Brent, Norquest, Jan, Stone, Margaret 04 1900 (has links)
1 p. / This is a series of 6 fact sheets related to identifying high quality youth programs from several perspectives: middle/high school youth, parents, youth development professionals and identifying resources in the community. It also includes a check list that will be included with each of the fact sheets.
16

Identifying High Quality Youth Programs: An Overview

Borden, Lynne, Stuart, Marta Elva, Tessman, Darcy, Waits, Juanita O'Campo, Lauxman, Lisa, Strickland, Brent, Norquest, Jan, Stone, Margaret 04 1900 (has links)
5 pp. / This is a series of 6 fact sheets related to identifying high quality youth programs from several perspectives: middle/high school youth, parents, youth development professionals and identifying resources in the community. It also includes a check list that will be included with each of the fact sheets.
17

Identifying High Quality Youth Programs: Information for Youth Development Professionals

Lauxman, Lisa, Stuart, Marta Elva, Tessman, Darcy, Waits, Juanita O'Campo, Strickland, Brent, Norquest, Jan, Stone, Margaret 04 1900 (has links)
4 pp. / This is a series of 6 fact sheets related to identifying high quality youth programs from several perspectives: middle/high school youth, parents, youth development professionals and identifying resources in the community. It also includes a check list that will be included with each of the fact sheets.
18

Identifying High Quality Youth Programs: Information for Parents

Strickland, Brent, Stuart, Marta Elva, Tessman, Darcy, Waits, Juanita O'Campo, Lauxman, Lisa, Norquest, Jan, Stone, Margaret 04 1900 (has links)
4 pp. / This is a series of 6 fact sheets related to identifying high quality youth programs from several perspectives: middle/high school youth, parents, youth development professionals and identifying resources in the community. It also includes a check list that will be included with each of the fact sheets.
19

Identifying High Quality Youth Programs: Information for High School Youth Professionals

Stuart, Marta, Tessman, Darcy, Waits, Juanita O'Campo, Lauxman, Lisa, Strickland, Brent, Norquest, Jan, Stone, Margaret 04 1900 (has links)
4 pp. / This is a series of 6 fact sheets related to identifying high quality youth programs from several perspectives: middle/high school youth, parents, youth development professionals and identifying resources in the community. It also includes a check list that will be included with each of the fact sheets.
20

Identifying High Quality Youth Programs: Quality Indicators for Out of School Time -- Quick Reference Guide

Stuart, Marta Elva, Tessman, Darcy, Waits, Juanita O'Campo, Lauxman, Lisa, Strickland, Brent, Norquest, Jan, Stone, Margaret 04 1900 (has links)
2 pp. / This is a series of 6 fact sheets related to identifying high quality youth programs from several perspectives: middle/high school youth, parents, youth development professionals and identifying resources in the community. It also includes a check list that will be included with each of the fact sheets.

Page generated in 0.112 seconds