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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Asian Americans and body image dissatisfaction: contributing factors for dissatisfaction and suggestions for how counselors can work with clients

Mann, Gloria G. 15 November 2010 (has links)
The Asian American population has increased almost ten percent in the past decade, marking the second highest growth rate of any racial group in the United States. Because of this increase, researchers need to be more informed about current issues that exist among this population, specifically within Asian American women and body satisfaction. This review seeks to explore the current research that exists on Asian American women and body satisfaction. Potential causes and explanations for why this population may deal with body satisfaction are then explored. These include historical causes, peer pressure, familial pressure, and media influence. The review then looks at methods counselors can use to effectively work with the Asian American women population. Finally, some recommendations for future studies are offered. Through this review, researchers and counselors can be better informed to work with the Asian American population. / text
2

Brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Are the Metaphors Necessary?

Alvis, Kayla M. 01 August 2013 (has links)
The role of common metaphors in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy was examined in a 35 min brief online workshop targeted at body image dissatisfaction. Participants consisted of 24 graduate level students who were randomly assigned to either the, "ACT as Usual" or "ACT without Metaphors" treatment condition. The "ACT as Usual" treatment condition incorporated common ACT metaphors into the workshop while the "ACT without Metaphors" utilized alternative exercises and literal explanations. Both of the workshops covered all six core components of ACT and provided the same basic information. Results of the present study indicated that there was a significant difference between pretest and posttest scores for the AAQ-W for both groups and no significant differences between pre and post CFQ-13 and PASTAS scores. Further, results indicate the use of common ACT metaphors did not significantly influence participant's scores. Future research should examine the use of ACT metaphors in a variety of settings and situations in order to determine their utility.
3

Girls, body image, and the school setting : an exploratory study

Gaudet, Gail Judy 04 December 2007
The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge and experiences of school counsellors, teachers, and school-based personnel in the area of girls body image. Participants perspectives were described and implications identified for ways in which teachers can encourage positive body image for girls in their classrooms. The idea for this research evolved from my interest in positive self-esteem, and academic and social success. As a teacher, I find that girls (more so than boys) base their success on body image. Girls often turn to harmful health behaviours such as disordered eating or excessive exercise because of dissatisfaction with their bodies (Tiggemann, 2005; ODea, 2000). I hoped to find ways for teachers to foster positive body image, and I believed school counsellors, teachers, and school-based personnel would be a useful source of information on this topic. I brought to this research a desire to hear, understand, and make meaning from these professionals experiences of working with girls.<p>There are a variety of things a teacher can do to create a positive environment in the school setting relating to body image. Focus group participants felt teachers and other school personnel could: <br>(a) openly allow body image discussion in the classrooms either through Talking Circles or Body Talk; <br>(b) promote active lifestyles; <br>(c) promote healthy eating habits; and <br>(d) act as role models by modelling the right examples. <p>Listening and encouraging students can also create a positive environment. The normal development of bodies should be discussed openly in the classrooms. In order to help create positive body images in young girls, participants believed it was important for teachers and school personnel to: participate in empathy training (learning to talk to each other and to listen to each other), educate parents; train physical education teachers; encourage students to write daily journals and critically analyze media literacy.
4

Girls, body image, and the school setting : an exploratory study

Gaudet, Gail Judy 04 December 2007 (has links)
The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge and experiences of school counsellors, teachers, and school-based personnel in the area of girls body image. Participants perspectives were described and implications identified for ways in which teachers can encourage positive body image for girls in their classrooms. The idea for this research evolved from my interest in positive self-esteem, and academic and social success. As a teacher, I find that girls (more so than boys) base their success on body image. Girls often turn to harmful health behaviours such as disordered eating or excessive exercise because of dissatisfaction with their bodies (Tiggemann, 2005; ODea, 2000). I hoped to find ways for teachers to foster positive body image, and I believed school counsellors, teachers, and school-based personnel would be a useful source of information on this topic. I brought to this research a desire to hear, understand, and make meaning from these professionals experiences of working with girls.<p>There are a variety of things a teacher can do to create a positive environment in the school setting relating to body image. Focus group participants felt teachers and other school personnel could: <br>(a) openly allow body image discussion in the classrooms either through Talking Circles or Body Talk; <br>(b) promote active lifestyles; <br>(c) promote healthy eating habits; and <br>(d) act as role models by modelling the right examples. <p>Listening and encouraging students can also create a positive environment. The normal development of bodies should be discussed openly in the classrooms. In order to help create positive body images in young girls, participants believed it was important for teachers and school personnel to: participate in empathy training (learning to talk to each other and to listen to each other), educate parents; train physical education teachers; encourage students to write daily journals and critically analyze media literacy.
5

The relationship between masculanity, body image and ego strength in male university students

Schneider, Vera 16 November 2006 (has links)
Student Number : 9901978A - MA research report - School of Human and Community Development - Faculty of Humanities / This research explored the relationship between gender identity, body image and ego strength in men. A questionnaire consisting of a demographic section, the Bem Sex Role Inventory, the Adonis Complex Questionnaire- Revised, and the Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strength was administered to 74 male students from the School of Actuarial Science and Statistics at the University of the Witwatersrand during lecture time. Correlation analyses were used to infer the relationships between the three variables, while a multiple regression assessed whether particular combinations of gender identity and ego strength could predict higher body image dissatisfaction. The results showed that both masculinity and androgyny had a positive effect on body image satisfaction, as did higher ego strength. The latter was also positively correlated with both femininity and masculinity, though not with androgyny. Body image disturbance did not correlate with any dimension of gender identity or ego strength. With regard to the interaction between the variables, higher ego strength was found to have a moderating effect on body image dissatisfaction in men who endorsed femininity, but not with men who endorsed masculinity. An androgynous orientation further predicted lower body image dissatisfaction irrespective of the degree of ego strength. Limitations of the study and recommendations for future research are discussed.
6

An investigation of body image dissatisfaction among Jewish American females: an application of the tripartite influence model

Greenberg, Stefanie Teri 01 December 2009 (has links)
Body image dissatisfaction at moderate levels can be a normative experience for many women of current American culture. However, women whose body dissatisfaction exceeds moderate levels are vulnerable to developing an eating disorder. Empirical findings show body dissatisfaction predicts low self-esteem, depression, and overall poor quality of life. Various theories aim to understand factors involved in the development and maintenance of body dissatisfaction. Sociocultural factors, such as peers, family, and media, have gained the greatest empirical support. The tripartite influence model of body image dissatisfaction and eating disturbance integrates sociocultural factors, and has been empirically tested to evaluate risk factors using an established theoretical model. However, this model has primarily been applied to Caucasian samples. A recent trend in the body image literature is increasing attention to ethnic differences in body image. Jews are an ethnic minority who has been virtually ignored in the empirical literature on body image; yet, studies suggest Jewish females experience body dissatisfaction. To date, no published empirical study has applied the tripartite influence model to Jewish American females. A sociocultural model can potentially increase understanding of body dissatisfaction among Jewish American females. This study used the tripartite influence model to examine relationships among variables (Jewish identity, parental influence, internalization of appearance) hypothesized to relate to body image dissatisfaction. Participants were 255 self-identified Jewish American women who completed a web-based survey measuring these constructs. Results showed a significant, yet weak, relationship between Jewish identity and body dissatisfaction. Contrary to prediction, Jewish women perceived greater pressure from fathers to lose weight than mothers, and no difference in pressure from both parents to gain weight and gain muscle. As perceived pressure from fathers to lose weight increases, women reported greater body dissatisfaction. A significant but weak relationship was found between perceived pressure from fathers to gain muscle and body dissatisfaction. The more women internalize media messages promoting the thin ideal for women, women reported less body satisfaction. A significant but low correlation was found between women who endorsed the "toned," athletic body ideal and body dissatisfaction.
7

Culture's not so great expectations: does feminist identity moderate women's experiences with sexism and body image dissatisfaction?

Linnebach, Daniela 29 September 2004 (has links)
No description available.
8

Toward an understanding of resilience to disordered eating and body image dissatisfaction among African American women: An analysis of the roles of ethnic and feminist identities

Wilcox, Jennifer Alice 30 July 2007 (has links)
No description available.
9

Body Shape Dissatisfaction: Patterns of Concern Among Subgroups of College Freshmen Women

Hansen, Kristina S Withers 09 July 2008 (has links) (PDF)
This study seeks to determine if there are patterns of differences according to college major in terms of the percentage of freshmen women who score in the clinically significant range on a measure of attitude toward body shape. Participants (N = 1,982) completed a demographic questionnaire and the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) and were divided into subgroups according to their stated college major. Descriptive statistics regarding BSQ scores were calculated for the total sample and subgroups. Results indicated that a greater percentage of participants in Theater, Communications, Psychology, Dance, Business, and Dietetics majors scored within clinically significant ranges on the BSQ. Students in these majors may benefit from targeted intervention and prevention efforts to address possible body image dissatisfaction.
10

Body Image: A Consideration of Immigrant Status, Ethnic Minority Status and Immigrant Concentration

Kimber, Melissa 11 1900 (has links)
Despite the developmental and clinical importance of body image during the pre-adolescent and adolescent years, there remains a dearth of information on the body image experiences of immigrant children and adolescents. This thesis represents a purposeful attempt to examine body image experiences among immigrant and ethnic minority children and adolescents in Canada and the United States (US). Specifically, the thesis integrates multiple methods (scoping reviews, qualitative interpretive description, quantitative multi-level modeling) and samples (clinical and population-based samples) to systematically contribute to the academic literature focusing on body image experiences among immigrant and ethnic minority children and adolescents in Canada and the US. Consisting of four conceptually related studies, this thesis makes the following methodological and conceptual contributions to epidemiological and clinical research and practice. First, the results from all four studies point to the need to develop standardized approaches for identifying and classifying immigrant and ethnic-minority children and adolescents. This will substantially increase the field’s ability to systematically characterize the nature and magnitude of body image dissatisfaction, body image distortion, and their associated outcomes among immigrant and ethnic minority children and adolescents. In addition, this systematic classification has the potential to inform the development or adaptation of universal and targeted preventative intervention strategies. Second, Study’s 1 and 2 demonstrate a clear need to further examine the constructs and experiences of acculturation and acculturative stress in relation to the body image experiences of immigrant and ethnic minority children and adolescents. The literature is unclear with respect to whether or not immigrant adolescents’ adoption of the values, behaviours and ideals of the Canadian or US culture increases their risk for body image concerns. On the other hand, we are also unclear as to whether or not immigrant adolescents’ retaining of the values, behaviours and ideals of their culture of origin may offer protection from poor body image experiences. Similarly, we are unclear about whether—and to what extent—stress as a result of adolescents’ acculturative experiences (i.e. acculturative stress) influence the onset or pervasiveness of body image concerns. Greater understanding about these constructs and processes and the extent to which they are implicated in the body image experiences among immigrant children and adolescents has the potential to inform culturally competent and targeted intervention approaches. Results from Study 3 indicate that immigrant adolescents have body image and appearance-related concerns that extend beyond what has typically been found among non-immigrant adolescents. More specifically, immigrant adolescents are concerned about the appearance of their skin (texture, complexion), their hair, their teeth, as well as other bodily features. It would be prudent for future researchers and clinicians to consider this information in relation to measuring, classifying and addressing body image dissatisfaction among immigrant adolescents. Finally, Study 4 demonstrates that females and first generation immigrants with body image dissatisfaction are at significantly elevated risk for body image distortion. This suggests that the assessment and intervention for body image dissatisfaction—particularly among females—soon after the migratory experience may play an important role in reducing body image distortion experiences. Taken together, the findings of this thesis strengthen the body image field by demonstrating that there are several unique aspects about being an immigrant that can influence adolescents’ body image experiences; and therefore, should be considered from a conceptual and methodological standpoint in future research and implementation of body image interventions. / Dissertation / Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) / Body image dissatisfaction and body image distortion have been linked to serious psychological outcomes, including depression and eating disorders. Yet, we know very little about the nature of these experiences among immigrant and ethnic minority children and adolescents. This thesis uses qualitative and quantitative methods, as well as general population and clinical samples to investigate body image dissatisfaction and body image distortion among immigrant and ethnic minority children and adolescents in Canada and the United States. Results provide important information that can inform the development of preventative interventions targeting body image dissatisfaction and body image distortion among immigrant and non-immigrant children and adolescents.

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