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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Decentralisation, development and accommodation of ethnic minorities: The case of Ethiopia

Ayele, Zemelak January 2012 (has links)
<p>Decentralisation of political, financial, and administrative powers to sub-national units has been, and remains to be, a major trend in both developing and developed states. Very often decentralisation is not optional for a state. However, a state has the option to choose what to achieve through its decentralisation programme.After choosing what it intends to achieve through its decentralisation programme, a state may design it in such a way that it may attain the intended purpose.Many countries design their decentralisation programmes with the purpose of &lsquo / deepening&rsquo / democracy and empowering their citizens. Other states decentralise power with the purpose of achieving development. They do so based on the postulate that development is preferable when it is achieved through the participation of those who benefit from it and that decentralisation enhances the extent and quality of citizen&rsquo / s direct and indirect participation. States also decentralise powers based on the assumption that decentralisation brings efficiency in planning and implementing development projects. Several states also use their decentralisation programme to&nbsp / respond to the ethnic, religious, or other diversities of their people. They use territorial and non-territorial arrangement to accommodate the diversity of their people. Therefore, in some cases they create ethnically structured regional and local units and transfer to such unit political powers including the power to decide on cultural matters. Like in so many countries, the wind of decentralisation has blown over Ethiopia. The country has been implementing a decentralisation programme starting from 1991. Ethiopia has selected to achieve two principal purposes through its decentralisation programme namely, to achieve development and to respond to the ethnic diversity of its people. It is axiomatic that the success of a decentralisation programme, whether for achieving development or accommodating ethnic diversity, is greatly impacted on by its institutional design. This thesis, therefore, examines whether Ethiopia&rsquo / s decentralisation programme incorporates the institutional features that are likely to impact the success of the decentralisation programme for achieving its intended purposes</p>
2

Decentralisation as a tool in managing the ethnic question: a case study of Uganda

Oloya, Charlotte January 2011 (has links)
No description available.
3

Decentralisation, development and accommodation of ethnic minorities: The case of Ethiopia

Ayele, Zemelak January 2012 (has links)
<p>Decentralisation of political, financial, and administrative powers to sub-national units has been, and remains to be, a major trend in both developing and developed states. Very often decentralisation is not optional for a state. However, a state has the option to choose what to achieve through its decentralisation programme.After choosing what it intends to achieve through its decentralisation programme, a state may design it in such a way that it may attain the intended purpose.Many countries design their decentralisation programmes with the purpose of &lsquo / deepening&rsquo / democracy and empowering their citizens. Other states decentralise power with the purpose of achieving development. They do so based on the postulate that development is preferable when it is achieved through the participation of those who benefit from it and that decentralisation enhances the extent and quality of citizen&rsquo / s direct and indirect participation. States also decentralise powers based on the assumption that decentralisation brings efficiency in planning and implementing development projects. Several states also use their decentralisation programme to&nbsp / respond to the ethnic, religious, or other diversities of their people. They use territorial and non-territorial arrangement to accommodate the diversity of their people. Therefore, in some cases they create ethnically structured regional and local units and transfer to such unit political powers including the power to decide on cultural matters. Like in so many countries, the wind of decentralisation has blown over Ethiopia. The country has been implementing a decentralisation programme starting from 1991. Ethiopia has selected to achieve two principal purposes through its decentralisation programme namely, to achieve development and to respond to the ethnic diversity of its people. It is axiomatic that the success of a decentralisation programme, whether for achieving development or accommodating ethnic diversity, is greatly impacted on by its institutional design. This thesis, therefore, examines whether Ethiopia&rsquo / s decentralisation programme incorporates the institutional features that are likely to impact the success of the decentralisation programme for achieving its intended purposes</p>
4

Decentralisation as a tool in managing the ethnic question: a case study of Uganda

Oloya, Charlotte January 2011 (has links)
No description available.
5

Parental participation in primary school governance in Uganda

Suzuki, Ikuko January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
6

The capacity of district hospitals to accommodate the decentralisation of mental health services: a cross sectional study of five government district hospitals in Botswana

Garrett-Walcott, Simone Alison 16 July 2008 (has links)
ABSTRACT Introduction In Southern Botswana, an expected advantage of the decentralisation and integration of mental health services into general health services was the potential to allow for the district hospitals to manage a larger number of mentally ill patients thus decreasing the patient load of Lobatse Mental Hospital. However, the number of admissions to the referral hospital for the south of Botswana is increasing. The objective of the study was to describe the capacity of district hospitals to care for mentally ill patients in terms of the provision of relevant inpatient, outpatient and outreach mental health services as well as the availability of trained workers who agree with the principles of decentralisation of mental health services. Materials and methods This was a descriptive cross sectional study involving a self-administered questionnaire survey of key informants and health care providers conducted in five district hospitals in the south of Botswana. There were a total of 5 Chief Medical Officers, and 75 ward staff (12 doctors and 63 nurses) in the study. The quantitative data was entered using the Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS version 13) and analyzed by this software. The qualitative data was coded and thematically analysed and reported. Results In all five hospitals, all the doctors and nurses had undergraduate training in psychiatry and were expected to manage mentally ill patients. There were eighteen health workers (1 doctor and 17 nurses) with postgraduate training in psychiatry/mental health.
7

Can public services improve? : the concept and practice of public service quality, with special reference to local government

Gaster, Lucy January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
8

The return of impact assessment : the rise of the Regional Shopping Centre and the 'return' of impact assessment methods in the UK

Norris, Steven January 1992 (has links)
No description available.
9

An analysis of the decentralisation framework provided for in the African Charter on the Values and Principles of Decentralisation, Local Governance and Local Development, 2014

Ziswa, Melissa Nyaradzo Sibongile January 2016 (has links)
Magister Legum - LLM / In 2014, the African Union (AU) adopted the African Charter on the Values and Principles of Decentralisation, Local Governance and Local Development (the African Charter on Decentralisation). The Charter is a first of its kind to provide a decentralisation framework for local government on the African continent. It seeks to use local government as a vehicle for improving the livelihoods of people on the African continent. Member States of the AU will only be bound by the African Charter on Decentralisation once they have ratified it. The actual impact of the Charter to improve the livelihood of people on the African continent is unknown. This research paper provides a critical analysis of the Charter in order to establish its potential. The analysis is undertaken against the background of the international literature on decentralisation and 'best' practices on local government. / South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChI)
10

District assemblies and participatory rural development in Ghana

Acheampong, Eric January 1994 (has links)
No description available.

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