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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The deon-telos of private property : ethical aspects of the theory and practice of private property

Lametti, David T. January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
2

Justifying constraints

Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
3

The Authority of Deontic Constraints

Ross, ANDREW 29 August 2013 (has links)
Non-consequentialists agree that Luke may not kill Lorelai in order to prevent Kirk from killing Richard and Emily. According to this view, Luke faces a deontic constraint: he is forbidden from killing Lorelai, even though doing so will bring about fewer killings overall. The justification of constraints, in my view, faces two challenges. First, constraints must meet the Irrationality Challenge: it needs to be demonstrated that there is nothing inconsistent about the claim that Luke should allow more killings to come about. And, secondly, a successful explanation of constraints must meet the Authority Challenge: we need to know why Luke’s reason not to kill Lorelai is normatively categorical. This dissertation takes up different aspects of Authority Challenge. The first introductory chapter aims to motivate the question of authority as a pressing challenge to non-consequentialism. I argue that the violation of constraints is not just motivated by the thought that they are rationally inconsistent, but by the claim that their intuitive importance cannot be explained. Chapters two and three take up the connection between the authority of constraints and their interpersonal character. In chapter two, I argue that Stephen Darwall’s account of the second-person standpoint cannot yield an account of constraints that satisfies the Authority Challenge and that T.M. Scanlon’s contractualism offers us a better way of accounting for the interpersonal significance of constraints. Chapter three argues that Frances Kamm’s inviolability approach cannot be reconciled with the intuitive distinction between acting wrongly and wronging someone. The arguments of this chapter are meant to demonstrate that in order for wronging to carry any normative significance, it must play a foundational role in our account of permissibility. The fourth chapter argues that Moderate deontologists—those who posit a threshold on the killing of the innocent—cannot make sense of the intuitive authority of deontic constraints. The failure of Moderate deontology, I argue, reveals the overlooked appeal of Absolutism. The fifth chapter argues that the authority of restrictions extends to a prohibition on killing non-responsible threats. I argue that a prohibition on killing non-responsible threats accords with the demands of fairness. / Thesis (Ph.D, Philosophy) -- Queen's University, 2013-08-29 10:37:45.739
4

The Authority of Deontic Constraints

Ross, ANDREW 29 August 2013 (has links)
Non-consequentialists agree that Luke may not kill Lorelai in order to prevent Kirk from killing Richard and Emily. According to this view, Luke faces a deontic constraint: he is forbidden from killing Lorelai, even though doing so will bring about fewer killings overall. The justification of constraints, in my view, faces two challenges. First, constraints must meet the Irrationality Challenge: it needs to be demonstrated that there is nothing inconsistent about the claim that Luke should allow more killings to come about. And, secondly, a successful explanation of constraints must meet the Authority Challenge: we need to know why Luke’s reason not to kill Lorelai is normatively categorical. This dissertation takes up different aspects of Authority Challenge. The first introductory chapter aims to motivate the question of authority as a pressing challenge to non-consequentialism. I argue that the violation of constraints is not just motivated by the thought that they are rationally inconsistent, but by the claim that their intuitive importance cannot be explained. Chapters two and three take up the connection between the authority of constraints and their interpersonal character. In chapter two, I argue that Stephen Darwall’s account of the second-person standpoint cannot yield an account of constraints that satisfies the Authority Challenge and that T.M. Scanlon’s contractualism offers us a better way of accounting for the interpersonal significance of constraints. Chapter three argues that Frances Kamm’s inviolability approach cannot be reconciled with the intuitive distinction between acting wrongly and wronging someone. The arguments of this chapter are meant to demonstrate that in order for wronging to carry any normative significance, it must play a foundational role in our account of permissibility. The fourth chapter argues that Moderate deontologists—those who posit a threshold on the killing of the innocent—cannot make sense of the intuitive authority of deontic constraints. The failure of Moderate deontology, I argue, reveals the overlooked appeal of Absolutism. The fifth chapter argues that the authority of restrictions extends to a prohibition on killing non-responsible threats. I argue that a prohibition on killing non-responsible threats accords with the demands of fairness. / Thesis (Ph.D, Philosophy) -- Queen's University, 2013-08-29 10:37:45.739
5

Three Worries about Moderate Deontology

January 2017 (has links)
abstract: Perhaps the most common and forceful criticism directed at absolutist deontological theories is that they allow for the occurrence of morally catastrophic events whenever such events could only and certainly be prevented by the violation of a deontological constraint. Some deontologists simply bite the bullet, accept this implication of their theory, and give their best arguments as to why it does not undermine absolutism. Others, I think more plausibly, opt for an alternative deontological theory known as ‘moderate deontology’ and are thereby able to evade the criticism since moderate deontology permits violations of constraints under certain extreme circumstances. The goal of this thesis is to provide a defense of moderate deontology against three worries about the view, namely, that it is more accurately interpreted as a kind of pluralism than as a deontology, that there is no non-arbitrary way of setting thresholds for deontological constraints, and that the positing of thresholds for constraints would lead to some problematic results in practice. I will respond to each of these worries in turn. In particular, I will argue that moderate deontology is properly understood as a deontological theory despite its partial concern for consequentialist considerations, that thresholds for deontological constraints can be successfully located without arbitrariness by democratic appeal to people’s commonsense moral intuitions, and that the alleged problematic results of positing thresholds for constraints can be effectively explained away by the moderate deontologist. / Dissertation/Thesis / Masters Thesis Philosophy 2017
6

Metodologinio pagrindo paieška bioetikos teorijose, paremtose deontologija ir utilitarizmu / A search for methodological basis in theories of bioethics, based on deontology and utilitarianism

Bartkienė, Aistė 02 March 2012 (has links)
Mokslinio darbo objektas - bioetikos teorijos, paremtos deontologija ir utilitarizmu. Darbo tikslas – įvertinti bioetikos teorijose siūlomų etinių principų normatyvinį pagrįstumą. Moksliniame darbe yra atlikta lyginamoji bioetikos teorijų analizė, išanalizuotas teorinių bioetikos koncepcijų prielaidų pagrįstumas. Yra teigiama, kad analizuojamas bioetikos teorijas galima skirstyti pagal jų konstravimo podūdį į homogeniškas ir heterogeniškas. Homogeniškos teorijos tesia konkrečią etinę tradiciją (deontologijos ar utilitarizmo) ir siūlo spręsti bioetines kontroversijas, tokias kaip abortai, eunazija, pagelbstimoji savižudybė taikant konkrečias vertybines nuostatas, būdingas astovaujamai šakai. Heterogeniškos teorijos bando derinti deontologiją su utilitarizmu vienoje koncepcijoje, siekdamos pasiūlyti bioetinių kontroversijų sprendimo būdus priimtinus pliuralistinėje visuomenėje. Disertacijoje teigiama, kad deontologija ir utilitarizmu pagrįstos bioetinės teorijos nepasiūlo aiškių ir priimtinų principų, reikalingų sprendžiant bioetines kontroversijas. / The object of dissertation is bioethical theories based on deontology and utilitarianism. The purpose of dissertation is to examine if ethical principles proposed in bioethical theories are normatively justified. In this work comparative analysis of bioethical theories is made and theoretical assumptions of bioethical conceptions are analyzed. It is stated that according to the construction manner of the analyzed bioethical theories it is possible to group these theories to homogenic and heterogenic ones. Homogenic theories are proceeding along particular ethical tradition (deontological or utilitarian) and propose to deal with bioethical controversies such as abortion, euthanasia, assisted suicide applying particular value-system. Heterogenic theories are trying to combine deontology with utilitarianism in one conception and in this way to propose method suitable for pluralistic society for dealing with bioethical controversies. In this work it is stated that bioethical theories based on deontology and utilitarianism do not introduce any clear and acceptable principles and methods needed for solving bioethical issues.
7

A search for methodological basis in theories of bioethics, based on deontology and utilitarianism / Metodologinio pagrindo paieška bioetikos teorijose, paremtose deontologija ir utilitarizmu

Bartkienė, Aistė 02 March 2012 (has links)
The object of dissertation is bioethical theories based on deontology and utilitarianism. The purpose of dissertation is to examine if ethical principles proposed in bioethical theories are normatively justified. In this work comparative analysis of bioethical theories is made and theoretical assumptions of bioethical conceptions are analyzed. It is stated that according to the construction manner of the analyzed bioethical theories it is possible to group these theories to homogenic and heterogenic ones. Homogenic theories are proceeding along particular ethical tradition (deontological or utilitarian) and propose to deal with bioethical controversies such as abortion, euthanasia, assisted suicide applying particular value-system. Heterogenic theories are trying to combine deontology with utilitarianism in one conception and in this way to propose method suitable for pluralistic society for dealing with bioethical controversies. In this work it is stated that bioethical theories based on deontology and utilitarianism do not introduce any clear and acceptable principles and methods needed for solving bioethical issues. / Mokslinio darbo objektas - bioetikos teorijos, paremtos deontologija ir utilitarizmu. Darbo tikslas – įvertinti bioetikos teorijose siūlomų etinių principų normatyvinį pagrįstumą. Moksliniame darbe yra atlikta lyginamoji bioetikos teorijų analizė, išanalizuotas teorinių bioetikos koncepcijų prielaidų pagrįstumas. Yra teigiama, kad analizuojamas bioetikos teorijas galima skirstyti pagal jų konstravimo podūdį į homogeniškas ir heterogeniškas. Homogeniškos teorijos tesia konkrečią etinę tradiciją (deontologijos ar utilitarizmo) ir siūlo spręsti bioetines kontroversijas, tokias kaip abortai, eunazija, pagelbstimoji savižudybė taikant konkrečias vertybines nuostatas, būdingas astovaujamai šakai. Heterogeniškos teorijos bando derinti deontologiją su utilitarizmu vienoje koncepcijoje, siekdamos pasiūlyti bioetinių kontroversijų sprendimo būdus priimtinus pliuralistinėje visuomenėje. Disertacijoje teigiama, kad deontologija ir utilitarizmu pagrįstos bioetinės teorijos nepasiūlo aiškių ir priimtinų principų, reikalingų sprendžiant bioetines kontroversijas.
8

The Justification of Deontology

Sinha, Gaurav Alex 18 July 2013 (has links)
Agent-centered restrictions are widely accepted both in commonsense morality and across social and legal institutions, making it all the more striking that we have yet to ground them in a compelling theoretical rationale. This dissertation amounts to an effort to fill that gap by seeking out a new principled basis for justifying such constraints. I devote each of the first three chapters, respectively, to the three established deontological normative ethical theories: Rossian intuitionism, Kantianism, and Neo-Thomism. In each of these chapters, I lay out the relevant portion of the view’s deontological apparatus, analyzing it both for its plausibility as a whole and for its ability to justify constraints of the appropriate shape. After assessing and rejecting all three approaches, I devote the next two chapters to developing a new rationale for grounding constraints—one that avoids the pitfalls indicated in the prominent historical alternatives. Specifically, I anchor constraints in the distinction between the agent-neutral and agent-relative points of view, basing them in the widely accepted psychological fact of the natural independence of the personal point of view.
9

The Justification of Deontology

Sinha, Gaurav Alex 18 July 2013 (has links)
Agent-centered restrictions are widely accepted both in commonsense morality and across social and legal institutions, making it all the more striking that we have yet to ground them in a compelling theoretical rationale. This dissertation amounts to an effort to fill that gap by seeking out a new principled basis for justifying such constraints. I devote each of the first three chapters, respectively, to the three established deontological normative ethical theories: Rossian intuitionism, Kantianism, and Neo-Thomism. In each of these chapters, I lay out the relevant portion of the view’s deontological apparatus, analyzing it both for its plausibility as a whole and for its ability to justify constraints of the appropriate shape. After assessing and rejecting all three approaches, I devote the next two chapters to developing a new rationale for grounding constraints—one that avoids the pitfalls indicated in the prominent historical alternatives. Specifically, I anchor constraints in the distinction between the agent-neutral and agent-relative points of view, basing them in the widely accepted psychological fact of the natural independence of the personal point of view.
10

The meaning of ethics and ethical dilemmas in social work practice : a qualitative study of Greek social workers

Giannou, D. January 2009 (has links)
Social work struggles between the dichotomy of “individual” and “society” as it is characterized as enhancing both individual well-being and social justice. As these are not always easily balanced and social work has limited autonomy, social workers must develop their capacity for making moral judgments and defend these within their various roles and responsibilities. Studies which explore the role of ethics in social work practice enhance the potential for maintaining a common identity. This exploration permits a deeper understanding of social work ethics and reinforces a common framework inclusive of purpose and standards for the profession. These studies also capture the contextual factors impacting on the moral agency of social workers, and thus substantiate the role for social work in a world with structured oppression. The purpose of this study was to obtain an in-depth understanding of social work ethics in the practice context of public hospitals in Greece. Using a case study design, data was gathered to explore and understand the role of social work ethics in daily practice and the formation of what is perceived as “good” practice. The analysis followed Yin‟s (1993) descriptive strategy. Data collection included fifteen in-depth interviews with hospital social workers, a group interview with social work academics, and a thematic analysis of the social work journal of the Hellenic Association of Social Workers (HASW). The meaning of ethical dilemmas and problems appeared to be constructed by personally held values, a lack of attention in social work education and the HASW on social work ethics, a professional emphasis on individualism rather than collectivism, and insufficient social protection in Greece. Importantly, these factors led to a fairly consistent response to ethical problems. “Having a clear conscience”, character traits such as bravery and imaginativeness, as well as the use of psychotherapy emerged as characteristics of “good” social work practice. These findings are of value to those who try to restore the values and ethics as central in social work. Values and ethics as key elements of social work expertise can lead social workers to a more competent and effective practice in terms of their ethical engagements.

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