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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Comparing the correctness of classical test theory and item response theory in evaluating the consistency and accurancy of student proficiency classifications

Gundula, Augustine M Unknown Date
No description available.
2

Student Perceptions of the Role of Portfolios in Evaluating the Outcomes of Pharmacy Education

Airey, Tatum, Bisso, Andrea, Murphy, John January 2011 (has links)
Class of 2011 Abstract / OBJECTIVES: The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education recommends incorporation of portfolios as part of the pharmacy curriculum. A study was conducted to evaluate students’ perceived benefits of the portfolio process and to gather suggestions for improving the process. METHODS: A questionnaire was designed, administered, and answered by 250 pharmacy first, second, and third year pharmacy students at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. The dependent variable was the students’ perceived benefit of the portfolio process. RESULTS: Students perceived increased benefit if the portfolio helped them: gain an understanding of the expected outcomes, understand the impact of extracurricular activities on attaining competencies, identify what should be learned, identify their strengths and weaknesses, and modify their approach to learning. First year students wanted more examples of portfolios while second and third years suggested more time with their advisor. CONCLUSION: Overall, students perceived the portfolio process as having moderate benefit.
3

Monitoring and Evaluating Cycling in Canadian Cities

Gallagher, Kathleen January 2013 (has links)
Many cities in North America have stated goals in their Official Plans, Transportation Plans, and other municipal documents related to cycling. A common objective is to increase the number and proportion of cyclists for either utilitarian or both utilitarian and recreational trips. To determine whether they are progressing towards achieving their goals, it is necessary that cities periodically and accurately monitor and measure their levels of cycling. This thesis aims to assess the different methods used for monitoring cycling in Canadian cities, as well as individual cities’ overall monitoring programs. The advantages and disadvantages of different methodologies and technologies are discussed, and best practices are provided. Four case study cities: Vancouver, Halifax, Calgary and Toronto are assessed according to a list of best practices developed by Hudson et al. (2010). Themes and patterns emerge and the cities are compared and contrasted. A summary of Canadian cities’ efforts is presented and the cities are ranked in the following order: #1 Vancouver; #2 Toronto; #3 Calgary; and #4 Halifax. In addition, the results of two surveys from the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area are compared at the census tract (CT) level to assess their reliability. The Bicycling Share of Work Trips (BSWT) from the Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS) and Statistics Canada’s Canadian Census (the Census) is examined to identify whether research from different sources is producing the same results. Geographic Information Systems are used to examine and compare the spatial patterns of the survey results and descriptive statistics are used to quantify the differences. It was found that the surveys are producing significantly different results and that there appears to be little spatial pattern in the difference between them. This research allows Canadian cities and other interested parties to learn about the various methods for monitoring cycling, to see which methods are being used in Canadian cities, to decide which methods are best for their specific needs, and to more comprehensively understand the BSWT from the Census and the TTS.
4

none

Chang, Huei-Jiun 12 June 2002 (has links)
English Abstract Evaluating the cases is the most important work in Venture Capital Company. So the key successful factor is to correctly and efficiently choose the invest case. In the past researches, they probed the important of evaluating criteria and ranged the evaluating criteria. But no study researches were from characters of manager, so the study wants to know the relationship between the characters of manager and the evaluating criteria. The results show that the venture capital managers who have commerce background would pay more attention to the marketing ability of enterprise team; managers who have science or engineering background would pay less attention to the financial ability of enterprise team; managers who have the experience in high-tech industry would pay less attention to marketing ability of enterprise team. And the emphases on managerial ability and product and technology innovation would grow up with the age of the venture capital managers. Besides that, this study finds that in the venture capital industry managers are very young and have high educational background.
5

Monitoring and Evaluating Cycling in Canadian Cities

Gallagher, Kathleen January 2013 (has links)
Many cities in North America have stated goals in their Official Plans, Transportation Plans, and other municipal documents related to cycling. A common objective is to increase the number and proportion of cyclists for either utilitarian or both utilitarian and recreational trips. To determine whether they are progressing towards achieving their goals, it is necessary that cities periodically and accurately monitor and measure their levels of cycling. This thesis aims to assess the different methods used for monitoring cycling in Canadian cities, as well as individual cities’ overall monitoring programs. The advantages and disadvantages of different methodologies and technologies are discussed, and best practices are provided. Four case study cities: Vancouver, Halifax, Calgary and Toronto are assessed according to a list of best practices developed by Hudson et al. (2010). Themes and patterns emerge and the cities are compared and contrasted. A summary of Canadian cities’ efforts is presented and the cities are ranked in the following order: #1 Vancouver; #2 Toronto; #3 Calgary; and #4 Halifax. In addition, the results of two surveys from the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area are compared at the census tract (CT) level to assess their reliability. The Bicycling Share of Work Trips (BSWT) from the Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS) and Statistics Canada’s Canadian Census (the Census) is examined to identify whether research from different sources is producing the same results. Geographic Information Systems are used to examine and compare the spatial patterns of the survey results and descriptive statistics are used to quantify the differences. It was found that the surveys are producing significantly different results and that there appears to be little spatial pattern in the difference between them. This research allows Canadian cities and other interested parties to learn about the various methods for monitoring cycling, to see which methods are being used in Canadian cities, to decide which methods are best for their specific needs, and to more comprehensively understand the BSWT from the Census and the TTS.
6

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Supplemental Labels in Museum Exhibits

Eliason, Clint B. 01 May 2007 (has links)
The present study used an experimental design to investigate the efficacy of using short (12 words or less), prominently placed supplemental labels to increase the effectiveness of select extant labels in museum exhibits. The experimenter-developed supplemental labels were designed to leverage exogenous/bottom-up and endogenous/top-down sources of influence on selective attention. Measures of patron behavior, knowledge retention, and attitude found no significant differences between group means under control and treatment conditions. These outcomes were surprising and inconsistent with findings from similar research conducted by Hirschi and Screven. The supplemental labels in the present study might have failed to capture attention because they were not sufficiently visually stimulating, they did not sufficiently tap internal motivations, or perhaps patrons experienced innattentional blindness in regards to them.
7

Children's comments on stories : a study of the propositions about evaluating and composing stories advanced by eight and eleven year old children

Croucher, Vaughan Stewart, n/a January 1984 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate children's comments on stories. Through a series of interviews the study sought to elicit comments from six 8 year old and six 11 year old children on evaluating literature, both their own and others and on how they compose stories. A classification system was applied to these comments so as to represent them as set of propositions, constructs or concerns about evaluating and composing stories. The system of classification applied was derived from the children's comments rather than use pre-determined categories. Propositions for evaluation were represented as a list of 'traits' and those for composing as a list of 'facets of the composing process.' These propositions were then compared and contrasted by age and mode (evaluation of reading or writing and comments on composing). This analysis led to the identification of some common concerns and patterns of response as well as distinctions according to age and the topic discussed. Video taped writing episodes were used to investigate the composing process. The children were asked to comment whilst writing and this was replayed for them to invite further comment and explanation. All other interviews were recorded on audio tape. Finally consideration is given to further applications of the analysis and methodology to children's comments.
8

Posouzení efektovnosti investičního záměru podnikatelského subjektu

Fornůsková, Magdaléna January 2011 (has links)
No description available.
9

Evaluating the Relationship Between Diabetes and Beverage Intake by Assessing Hemoglobin A1c

Kung, Diana, Patel, Dhara, Riedel, Caroline, Kennedy, Amy January 2016 (has links)
Class of 2016 Abstract / Objectives: The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a correlation between diabetes control and beverage consumption. We hypothesize that diabetes control (as measured by A1C) is inversely related to consumption of sugary sweetened beverages (SSB) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This study will be a retrospective chart review evaluating the relationship between intake of sugary sweetened beverages and hemoglobin A1C values (HgA1C). Individuals will be eligible for inclusion in the study if they are current patients at El Rio Community Health Center with type 2 diabetes and were 18 years of age or older at the time of the study. Exclusion criteria are as follows: not seen by a clinical pharmacist for diabetes within the last year (Jan 2015 – Feb 2016), no beverage consumption information available in electronic chart and/or no A1C value listed in the patient’s profile. The anticipated study population will be comprised of 330 patients. The data will be analyzed using a t-test to determine the relationship between A1C and beverage consumption. Results: 150 patients were identified from the patient pool as meeting inclusion criteria. The mean fluid ounces of SSB consumption in the low SSB intake group and high SSB intake group were 7.2 (SD=2.441) and 30.269 (SD=21.197) respectively. The mean A1C in the low SSB intake group was 8.35 (SD=2.038) and in the high SSB intake group was 8.799 (SD=1.852). There was no statistically significant difference between the mean A1C in the low SSB intake group and the high SSB intake group (p=0.2451). Conclusions: The mean A1C between high SSB intake and low SSB intake appears similar.
10

The Evaluation of University-Community Engagement Scholarship Within the College Level Promotion and Tenure Process

Baker, Della A. 11 May 2001 (has links)
The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the evaluation of university-community engagement scholarship through the college level promotion and tenure process at Southeastern University and to determine the value of faculty engagement as scholarship through that process. This study also examined useful criteria for judging such scholarship. In designing this study, three research methods were employed. Those methods were (a) interviews with faculty and department heads within the College of Education, and other university administrators at Southeastern University; (b) a review of university documents germane to the promotion and tenure process; and (c) an examination of dossier comment forms about a fictional dossier. Data were transcribed, coded, and categorized using content analysis. A role-ordered matrix was designed to display the perceptions and attitudes of the participants interviewed regarding the evaluation of engagement scholarship within the College of Education at Southeastern University. A conceptually clustered matrix was used to display empirical data that related by theme. A case dynamics matrix was used as an attempt to link consequential processes. An event network was helpful in displaying relationships among the respondents regarding the promotion and tenure process. This network depicted the people within that process and the flow of major communication that affects the promotion and tenure process. This study resulted in a model of engagement scholarship and a model for promoting engagement within a university setting. Findings from this study included a list of criteria offered by the resondents that paralleled those proposed by Glassick et al (1997). Perceived values of engagement scholarship were mixed and depended on whether such scholarship produced publications, grants, and contracts. This study might be useful for persons being evaluated for university-community engagement scholarship and for those evaluating university-community engagement scholarship in university setting. / Ph. D.

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