• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 58
  • 40
  • 11
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 127
  • 54
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The museum of the personal : souvenirs and nostalgia

Benson, Tracey January 2001 (has links)
This research paper examines the role of the souvenir in terms of social relations and notions of self-identity and/or autobiography. Many types of souvenir objects (commercial and non-commercial) are explored as being agents that participate in the construction of identity. Commodity fetishism, nostalgia and fetishism are examined as key elements that define the social relations surrounding the souvenir. The notion of home and family is also explored as a fundamental aspect of how identity is constructed.
2

The officer fetish

Van Meter, Larry Allan 17 February 2005 (has links)
The Officer Fetish examines the fetishized American military officer and the marginalized American enlisted man as they appear in post-World War II American film, television, and literature. The fetishized officer, whose cathexis is most prominent in the World War II-era propaganda film, has persisted as a convention since the war—a phenomenon that has contributed to the rise of militarism in America. Chapter II lays the foundation of Marxist and Freudian definitions of fetishism and fetishization, and then gauges those definitions with two films, In Which We Serve (1942), a standard World War II propaganda film, and Saving Private Ryan (1997), a film that postures itself as anti-war. Chapter III examines war narratives as a medium that polices class in American culture. The military, with its anti-democratic two-tiered rank system, is attractive to many novels and films because of its strict class boundaries. Chapter IV examines the degree to which so-called anti-war narratives contribute to America’s rising economy of militarism.
3

Les prises de risque sexuel liées au VIH-sida chez les gays : pari inconscient et logique fétichiste du désir / Sexual risk behavior related to HIV-Aids in gay men : unconscious wager and fetishistic logic and desire

Bonny, Pierre 27 June 2012 (has links)
L’objectif de cette thèse est de repérer les mécanismes psychopathologiques inconscients susceptibles de conduire des sujets gays à prendre des risques par rapport au VIH/sida. D’un point de vue épidémiologique, les homosexuels masculins constituent en effet la « population » la plus touchée par cette épidémie en France. Or, les études de psychologie comportementale et de sociologie constructionniste déjà menées sur ce sujet sont limitées dans leur analysepar des présupposés rationalistes et des méthodologies directives. En partenariat avec des associations de lutte contre le sida, nous avons mené des entretiens basés sur l’association libre, le transfert, et analysés à l’aune du signifiant selon lesenseignements de Freud et de Lacan. S’en dégage un savoir inédit, propre à chaque sujet, et qui traverse l’ensemble des cas. Le moment de bascule dans le risque intervient comme une tentative de séparation par rapport à une problématiqueinconsciente dans laquelle le sujet se vit aliéné. Cette problématique a pour fondement structural le rejet du phallus du don dans l’Autre, auquel le sujet se vit réduit lors de ruptures amoureuses ou quand la réalisation de soi dans une pratiqueartistique devient impossible. Dans ces contextes, le sida fait l’objet d’une fétichisation, susceptible de mortifier davantage encore le sujet. Mais en lui redonnant la parole là où elle lui a manqué dans l’acte, des entretiens orientés par lapsychanalyse sont à mêmes de le détourner du risque. Par rapport à ces cas de structure fétichiste, des cas de psychose sont enfin discutés, qui permettent d’envisager une clinique continuiste des suppléances au manque dans l’Autre / The objective of this dissertation is to identify unconscious psychopathological mechanisms adequate to induce risk behaviour related to HIV/Aids in gay men. Namely, seen from an epidemiological perspective, gay males compose the section of the population most affected by this epidemic. Existing studies in behavioral psychology and constructivist sociology dealing with this question are limited in their analysis by rationalist assumptions and their directiveapproach. In cooperation with associations fighting against Aids, we carried out interviews based on free association and transference and analysed them following the teachings of Freud and Lacan. An unprecedented knowledge is produced byeach person for his individual case and at the same time pervades the totality of the cases. The moment of taking a risk occurs in an attempt of detachment related to an unconscious problem in which the person is alienated from himself. This problem is structurally based on the rejection of the phallus of giving in the Other, to which the person feels reduced after a breakup or when the self-realization by means of artistic activity fails. In this context, Aids becomes an object of fetishisation”, leading to further mortification of the person. By giving back the words where they were lacking in the act, interviews based on psychoanalysis are able to change a person’s risk behaviour. Finally, we will discuss these cases of fetishist structure in comparison with cases of psychosis, which will enable us to make out common traits in theapproach to emptiness in the Other
4

Subjects, objects, and the fetishisms of modernity in the works of Gertrude Stein

Livett, Kate, School of English, Media & Performing Arts, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
This thesis reopens the question of subject/object relations in the works of Gertrude Stein, to argue that the fetishisms theorised by Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, and later Walter Benjamin and Michael Taussig, and problematised by feminist critics such as Elizabeth Grosz, are central to the structure of those relations. My contribution to Stein scholarship is twofold, and is reflected in the division of my thesis into Part One and Part Two. Part One of this thesis establishes a model for reading the interconnections between subjects and objects in Stein???s work; it identifies a tension between two related yet different structures. The first is a fetishistic relation of subjects to objects, associated by Stein with materiality and nineteenth-century Europe, and the identity categories of the ???genius??? and the ???collector???. The second is a ???new??? figuration of late modernity in which the processual and tacility are central. This latter is associated by Stein with America and the twentieth century, and was a structure that she, along with other modernist artists, was developing. Further, Part One shows how these competing structures of subject/object relations hinge on Stein???s problematic formulations of self, nation, and artistic production. Part Two uses the model established in Part One to examine the detailed playing-out of the tensions and dilemmas of subject/object relations within several major Stein texts. First considered is the category of the object as it is constructed in Tender Buttons, and second the category of the subject as it is represented in the nexus of those competing structures in The Making of Americans and ???Melanctha???. The readings of Part Two engage with the major strands of Stein criticism of materiality, sexuality, and language in Tender Buttons, Stein???s famous study of objects. The critical areas engaged with in her biggest and most controversial texts respectively ??? The Making of Americans and ???Melanctha??? ??? include typology, ???genius???, and Stein???s methodologies of writing such as repetition/iteration, intersubjectivity, and ???daily living???. This thesis contends that the dilemma of subject/object relations identified and examined in detail is never resolved, indeed, its ongoing reverberations are productive up until and including her final work.
5

Subjects, objects, and the fetishisms of modernity in the works of Gertrude Stein

Livett, Kate, School of English, Media & Performing Arts, UNSW January 2006 (has links)
This thesis reopens the question of subject/object relations in the works of Gertrude Stein, to argue that the fetishisms theorised by Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, and later Walter Benjamin and Michael Taussig, and problematised by feminist critics such as Elizabeth Grosz, are central to the structure of those relations. My contribution to Stein scholarship is twofold, and is reflected in the division of my thesis into Part One and Part Two. Part One of this thesis establishes a model for reading the interconnections between subjects and objects in Stein???s work; it identifies a tension between two related yet different structures. The first is a fetishistic relation of subjects to objects, associated by Stein with materiality and nineteenth-century Europe, and the identity categories of the ???genius??? and the ???collector???. The second is a ???new??? figuration of late modernity in which the processual and tacility are central. This latter is associated by Stein with America and the twentieth century, and was a structure that she, along with other modernist artists, was developing. Further, Part One shows how these competing structures of subject/object relations hinge on Stein???s problematic formulations of self, nation, and artistic production. Part Two uses the model established in Part One to examine the detailed playing-out of the tensions and dilemmas of subject/object relations within several major Stein texts. First considered is the category of the object as it is constructed in Tender Buttons, and second the category of the subject as it is represented in the nexus of those competing structures in The Making of Americans and ???Melanctha???. The readings of Part Two engage with the major strands of Stein criticism of materiality, sexuality, and language in Tender Buttons, Stein???s famous study of objects. The critical areas engaged with in her biggest and most controversial texts respectively ??? The Making of Americans and ???Melanctha??? ??? include typology, ???genius???, and Stein???s methodologies of writing such as repetition/iteration, intersubjectivity, and ???daily living???. This thesis contends that the dilemma of subject/object relations identified and examined in detail is never resolved, indeed, its ongoing reverberations are productive up until and including her final work.
6

Fonctions sociologiques des figurines de culte hamba dans la société et dans la culture tshokwé (Angola)

Lima, Augusto Guilherme Mesquitela. January 1971 (has links)
Thèse--Paris, 1969. / Bibliography: p. 389-401.
7

Fonctions sociologiques des figurines de culte hamba dans la société et dans la culture tshokwé (Angola)

Lima, Augusto Guilherme Mesquitela. January 1971 (has links)
Thèse--Paris, 1969. / Bibliography: p. 389-401.
8

Fetishes, images, commodities, art works : Afro-Brazilian art and culture in Bahia /

Sansi-Roca, Roger. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology, December 2003. / CD-ROM contains PDF files of entire dissertation. Includes bibliographical references. Also available on the Internet.
9

¡§Pervasive Perversion¡¨: Reconfiguring the Subject¡¦s Relationship with the Other in Don DeLillo¡¦s White Noise

Liang, Shuo-en 04 February 2010 (has links)
For the readers of White Noise, the first issue he or she has to deal with is the relationship between the society and the individual. But DeLillo was never straightforward in Jack¡¦s narrative. From time to time, the reader is asked to judge by themselves about the authorial intention and the narrator¡¦s attitude toward the characters¡¦ suffering. As both the narrator and a character, Jack Gladney typifies the tension of locating the hope of resistance in a seemingly hopeless situation. As the narrator, Jack¡¦s attitude toward the corrupting force of the society would seem to vacillate among indifference and affirmation. Yet, his indifference would appear to be sarcastic or even accusatory if one remembers that he or she is reading one of DeLillo¡¦s novels. The interpretive deadlock, then, can be summarized into the following question: if DeLillo intended to posit the possibility of resistance through the process of writing and reading, how can it be realized in the protagonist with whom the reader is invited to identify? Numerous approaches are adopted by the critics, and yet the enigmatic ending of the novel continues to challenge the results of their efforts. With ease, Jack Gladney returns to his normal routine after he nearly kills a man, but it is indicated that he is never the same person as exhibited in the previous chapters. To determine the nature of transformation and its implication for the existence of hope, this thesis sets out to dissect the important elements in the last chapter. As the novel ends in Jack¡¦s shopping, the chapter two of this thesis traces the influence of capitalism on the characters. It is found that the characters¡¦ enjoyment of the consumerism is correlative with a fundamental imperfection in their sense of self. In narrating the stories about him, Jack Gladney cannot hide his anxiety for failing to be a good professor, husband and father. From a Lacanian perspective, the disjointedness reveals the failure of the system to provide all his needs. Still, Jack and others are spurred to immerse harder in the ever-revolutionizing mode of enjoyment, endlessly deferring from confronting the void inherent in all their pursuits. Before Jack returns to shop for the last time in the novel, however, he is infected by toxic substance that causes him to eye the capitalist system with suspicion. During the outbreak of the disaster, the New Age belief system, painful enjoyment and environmental crisis are associated with the oppressive force of capitalist development. They all reappear in the end of the novel, yet they are no longer threats for Jack; instead, he finds them enjoyable. In the chapter three of this thesis, my analysis recounts how the characters¡¦ reluctance to depart from their routine of enjoyment contributes to their intentional disavowals of the injuries the system brings to them. In Jack¡¦s case, the biopolitical control that results in the elevation of the status of medical science and enjoyment causes him to resubmit himself more violently to the system. He becomes a killer and enjoys seeing himself as such who seems to contribute to all the subjects in the capitalist society. It is after such sad transformation that the final chapter begins, suddenly deflating the emotional turbulences accumulated throughout the previous chapters. The enigmatic vacuum is still accompanied by signs of Jack¡¦s transformation. However, the omnipresence of death in the chapter seems to weaken the certainty for a pessimistic future of suffering in the capitalist system. Waiting before the checking out point, Jack is in fact facing to the end of vicious circle symbolically. The unfathomable death corresponds with the impossibility the reader encounters when interpreting the text. As the readers cannot determine what will happen after the terminal, they are actually freed from chopping the text for constructing hopes that will be contradicted by the remaining paragraphs at one point or another, while they have to put down the novel and go on living with the similar situations the novel portrays. Herein resides the hope: externalizing the deadlock of life for the reader, the end of White Noise testifies the ongoing procession of human history that cannot be anticipated beforehand.
10

Fetishism as historical practice in postmodern American fiction

Kocela, Christopher. January 2002 (has links)
This study contends that postmodern American fiction dramatizes an important shift of philosophical perspective on the fetish in keeping with recent theories of fetishism as a cultural practice. This shift is defined by the refusal to accept the traditional Western condemnation of the fetishist as primitive or perverse, and by the effort to affirm more productive uses for fetishism as a theoretical concept spanning the disciplines of psychoanalysis, Marxian social theory, and anthropology. Analyzing the depiction of fetishistic practices in selected contemporary American novels, the dissertation utilizes fetish theory in order to clarify the unique textual and historiographic features of postmodernist fiction. It also emphasizes the way in which conventional ideas about history and teleology are necessarily challenged by an affirmative orientation toward the fetish. Part One of the dissertation, comprising the first two chapters, traces the lineage of Western thinking about fetishism from Hegel, Marx, and Freud to Derrida, Baudrillard, and Jameson, among others. Recognizing that traditional theories attribute the symbolic power of the fetish to its mystification of historical origins, Part One posits that poststructuralist and postmodernist contributions to the subject enable, but do not develop, an alternative concept of fetishism as a practice with constructive historical potential. Part Two of the study seeks to develop this historical potential with reference to prominent descriptive models of postmodernist fiction, and through close readings of five contemporary American authors: Thomas Pynchon, Kathy Acker, Robert Coover, John Hawkes, and Don DeLillo. The four chapters of Part Two each examine the fictional representation of fetishism within a different theoretical framework, focusing on, respectively: temporality and objectivity in postmodern fiction theory; the interrelation between psychoanalytic theory and female fetishism in novels by Pynchon and Acker

Page generated in 0.051 seconds