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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

CREB site in the EMP2 proximal promoter region is critical for its transcription

Huang, Hsiung-Yi 27 December 2007 (has links)
Widespread epidemiological data support the notion that high isoflavoves intake is safe and provides health benefits similar to estrogen. Isoflavones have been reported to regulate genes that are involved in several cellular events, such as control of cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis, transcription regulation, cancer invasion and metastasis and so on. Previously, soy isoflavones have been demonstrated to have a tumor suppressor effect on bladder cancer. We earlier identified 71 candidate bladder tumor suppressors by using the isoflavones treatment vs. non-treatment in RT4 (Stage I, TMN) cells in conjunction with the strategy of suppression subtractive cDNA libraries. In a preliminary screening, epithelial membrane protein 2 (EMP2) mRNA was downregulated in higher TMN-grade bladder tumor cells. In this study, we aim at the mechanism of isoflavones upregulation of the candidate bladder tumor suppressor: EMP2. In order to clarify the regulatory mechanism, we have constructed a series of 5¡¦ deletion fragment of EMP2 promoter (-1,420 to +268 bp) into a luciferase reporter plasmid pGL3-baisc and analyzed the promoter activity. The rapidly loss of the promoter activities when the region between pH (-44 to +268) and pI (-24 to +268) is deleted, suggesting that at least one critical transcriptional factor binding site may exist between -44 to -24 bp region. By bioinformatics, the transcription factor CREB1 binding site is predicted in the critical region. The ChIP assay and site-directed mutagenesis of the CREB site reveal its critical role for the EMP2 transcription. The EMP2 mRNA is downregulated after knock-down of CREB1 protein by shCREB1 in J82 cells. It can be evidence for EMP2 transcription is regulated by transcription factor CREB1. In investigations of genistein (one component of isoflavones) up-regulated EMP2 transcripts, we find there are consistent results for genistein upregulated of EMP2 promoter region. In conclusion, transcription factor CREB1 plays an important role in the regulation of EMP2 transcription.
2

Estradiol and Genistein Alter Cellular Physiology of Non-Malignant Colonocytes

Billimek, Autumn Renee 2011 August 1900 (has links)
Many studies show that estradiol (E2) and consumption of soy and its primary phytoestrogen component genistein (GEN) can inhibit the formation of colon tumors. However, the effects of E2 and GEN at physiologically relevant levels in non-diseased colonocytes have yet to be investigated. We hypothesized that E2 and GEN could prove to be chemo-protective agents in the colon by moderately increasing apoptosis and decreasing proliferation in a healthy system. Thus, the presented studies focused on evaluating the effects of E2 and GEN in non-malignant colonocytes in vitro and in vivo to determine how the compounds influence the physiology of these cells. E2 (1 nM/L) and GEN treatments (1 and 10 microM/L) decreased cell growth, increased apoptosis, and increased p53 transcriptional activity in young adult mouse colonocytes, a non-malignant cell line. To study further the effects of E2 and GEN in healthy colonic epithelia, we evaluated physiologic changes in colonic crypts in ovariectomized mice given an E2 pellet, 1,000 ppm GEN diet, or a phytoestrogen free diet. As seen in vitro, E2 treated animals had significantly higher rates of apoptosis with GEN trending in the same fashion. These data demonstrate that E2 and GEN alter the physiology of non-malignant colonocytes. Collectively, with our previous data, this suggests that E2 and GEN influence colonocyte physiology and this state may partially explain how these compounds decrease risk of colon cancer.
3

EFFECTS OF SOYBEAN-DERIVED PHYTOESTROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE TRACT DEVELOPMENT IN NEONATAL MALE AND FEMALE PIGS:

Necaise, Kevin Wade 12 May 2012 (has links)
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of orally administered soy-derived extracts on normal reproductive development in neonatal pigs as a model for infants on soy formula. Yorkshire-Landrace crossbred sows were randomly assigned to a lactating diet supplemented with either Novasoy 70 or without. Feed was top-dressed from d 100 of gestation until farrowing. Neonatal pigs (NPs) were weighed on post natal day (PND) six then randomly assigned to one of four treatments 1) control, 2) estradiol, 3) low, or 4) high genistein dose. This study demonstrates that oral exposure of NPs to estradiol but not genistein alters reproductive tract development and that this effect may be amplified from in utero exposure to sow diets with elevated concentrations of phytoestrogens. Thus, the neonatal pig may provide a useful model for assessing effects of dietary phytoestrogens on reproductive development in infants on soy-based formulas.
4

The localisation of germination proteins in spores of Bacillus subtilis

Hudson, Kaye D. January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
5

Effects of soy phytoestrogen genistein on the reproductive development of immature female broiler chickens

Stevenson, Lindsay Marie, January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--Auburn University, 2007. / Abstract. Vita. Includes bibliographic references (ℓ. 107-127)
6

Investigation of the Effects of Genistein and Fenretinide on Ovarian Cancer Cells

Azadi, Behnam 10 January 2012 (has links)
The effects of the fenretinide and genistein as single or combined drugs on ovarian cancer proliferation and viability were investigated. Hypothesis: Co-treatment with genistein will enable a lower dose of fenretinide to be effective in inhibiting the proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells. Methods: Low and high doses of genistein and fenretinide were tested on A2780s and A2780cp cells using trypan blue viable cell count, MTS assay. Results and conclusions: Unlike low doses of fenretinide, genistein had anti-proliferative effects on both cell lines. There were no additive or synergistic effects of the two compounds. Higher dose treatments induced anti-proliferative effects and apoptotic cell death in both A2780s and A2780cp cells, with a greater sensitivity of A2780s cells to both test compounds. Overall Conclusion: Genistein and higher doses of fenretinide similarly impair cell cycle progression and induce apoptosis. The anti-proliferative effects of genistein can be affected by co-treatment with fenretinide
7

Effects of Genistein Following Fractionated Lung Irradiation in Mice

Para, Andrea 22 September 2009 (has links)
Radiation therapy for lung cancer and cancers of the upper thorax is limited by side effects to normal tissue of the lung. An understanding of mechanisms leading to radiation induced lung damage is essential to developing protective agents. In this thesis an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent Genistein was investigated for its potential to affect DNA damage, tissue inflammation, functional deficits and survival. We hypothesized that chronic oxidative stress and the subsequent inflammatory response play a key role in the development of major lung complications, radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. If side effects of radiation could be reduced, then larger doses could be delivered to the tumor with a better chance of eradicating the disease.
8

Investigation of the Effects of Genistein and Fenretinide on Ovarian Cancer Cells

Azadi, Behnam 10 January 2012 (has links)
The effects of the fenretinide and genistein as single or combined drugs on ovarian cancer proliferation and viability were investigated. Hypothesis: Co-treatment with genistein will enable a lower dose of fenretinide to be effective in inhibiting the proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells. Methods: Low and high doses of genistein and fenretinide were tested on A2780s and A2780cp cells using trypan blue viable cell count, MTS assay. Results and conclusions: Unlike low doses of fenretinide, genistein had anti-proliferative effects on both cell lines. There were no additive or synergistic effects of the two compounds. Higher dose treatments induced anti-proliferative effects and apoptotic cell death in both A2780s and A2780cp cells, with a greater sensitivity of A2780s cells to both test compounds. Overall Conclusion: Genistein and higher doses of fenretinide similarly impair cell cycle progression and induce apoptosis. The anti-proliferative effects of genistein can be affected by co-treatment with fenretinide
9

Investigation of the Effects of Genistein and Fenretinide on Ovarian Cancer Cells

Azadi, Behnam 10 January 2012 (has links)
The effects of the fenretinide and genistein as single or combined drugs on ovarian cancer proliferation and viability were investigated. Hypothesis: Co-treatment with genistein will enable a lower dose of fenretinide to be effective in inhibiting the proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells. Methods: Low and high doses of genistein and fenretinide were tested on A2780s and A2780cp cells using trypan blue viable cell count, MTS assay. Results and conclusions: Unlike low doses of fenretinide, genistein had anti-proliferative effects on both cell lines. There were no additive or synergistic effects of the two compounds. Higher dose treatments induced anti-proliferative effects and apoptotic cell death in both A2780s and A2780cp cells, with a greater sensitivity of A2780s cells to both test compounds. Overall Conclusion: Genistein and higher doses of fenretinide similarly impair cell cycle progression and induce apoptosis. The anti-proliferative effects of genistein can be affected by co-treatment with fenretinide
10

Effects of Genistein Following Fractionated Lung Irradiation in Mice

Para, Andrea 22 September 2009 (has links)
Radiation therapy for lung cancer and cancers of the upper thorax is limited by side effects to normal tissue of the lung. An understanding of mechanisms leading to radiation induced lung damage is essential to developing protective agents. In this thesis an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent Genistein was investigated for its potential to affect DNA damage, tissue inflammation, functional deficits and survival. We hypothesized that chronic oxidative stress and the subsequent inflammatory response play a key role in the development of major lung complications, radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. If side effects of radiation could be reduced, then larger doses could be delivered to the tumor with a better chance of eradicating the disease.

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