• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 4
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Uncertainty in the Global Mean for Improved Geostatistical Modeling

Villalba Matamoros, Martha Emelly Unknown Date
No description available.
2

Uncertainty in the Global Mean for Improved Geostatistical Modeling

Villalba Matamoros, Martha Emelly 11 1900 (has links)
Analysis of uncertainty in ore reserves impacts investment decisions, mine planning and sampling. Uncertainty is evaluated by geostatistical simulation and is affected by the amount of data and the modeling parameters. Incomplete uncertainty is given because the parameter uncertainty is ignored. Also, greater spatial continuity leads to more uncertainty. This increase is unreasonable in earth science. To address these problems, two approaches are proposed. The first approach is based on multiGaussian simulation where many realizations are performed at translated and/or rotated configurations and conditioned to the data. Variable configurations give different mean values that define uncertainty. The second approach is based on a stochastic trend; this approach randomizes the trend coefficients accounting for the fitted coefficients correlation. Variable set of coefficients provide different mean values. Furthermore, a methodology to account for parameter uncertainty is proposed. The uncertainty in the mean is transferred through simulation to deliver a more complete uncertainty. / Mining Engineering
3

Magnitude and Mechanisms of Unforced Variability in Global Surface Temperature

Brown, Patrick Thomas January 2016 (has links)
<p>Global mean surface air temperature (GMST) is one of the most well-known and robust measures of global climate change both contemporarily as well as through deep time. In contemporary climate science, the most often discussed causes of GMST change are referred to as external radiative forcings, which are considered to be exogenous to the land-atmosphere-ocean system and which impose a radiative energy imbalance (N) at the top of the earth’s atmosphere. Examples of external radiative forcings include changes in well-mixed greenhouse gas concentrations, changes in volcanic or anthropogenic aerosol loading, anthropogenic changes in land use, and changes in incoming solar radiation. The climate system can also produce unforced variability in GMST that spontaneously emerges from the internal dynamics of the land-atmosphere-ocean system. Unforced GMST variability can emerge via a vertical redistribution of heat within the climate system. For example, there can be a net transport of energy from below the ocean’s mixed layer to the surface during an El-Niño event. Additionally, unforced GMST variability can be due to an unforced change in N. For example, an internally generated change in the strength of an ocean circulation could alter the extent of sea ice and thus change the Earth’s albedo.</p><p>Understanding the magnitude and mechanisms underlying unforced GMST variability is relevant for both the attribution of past climate change to various causes, as well to the prediction of future changes on policy-relevant timescales. However, the literature on unforced GMST variability, particularly at interdecadal and longer timescales, is inconsistent and there is significant disagreement on its magnitude, on its primary geographic origins, and on the physical mechanisms that are most responsible.</p><p>This dissertation seeks to advance the scientific understanding of unforced GMST variability by addressing seven primary scientific goals: 1) To identify the geographic locations (and by proxy modes of variability) that are most responsible for unforced GMST variability in both the instrumental record and in climate models. 2) To identify the primary reasons why AOGCMs disagree on the magnitude of interdecadal unforced GMST variability. 3) To quantify the magnitude of unforced GMST variability in observations over the instrumental record as well as in multi-proxy reconstructions over the past millennium. 4) To quantify the degree to which unforced GMST variability is influenced by internally generated N energy imbalances. 5) To understand how anomalous N fluxes can influence large scale modes of surface temperature variability that affect GMST, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). 6) To understand the nature of the restoring force responsible for returning a perturbed GMST anomaly back to equilibrium; and 7) To understand how the magnitude and mechanisms of GMST variability might change in the future as the climate warms. </p><p>This research relies on the analysis of coupled Atmosphere-Ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) that participated in Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), satellite observations of the Earth’s energy budget from the Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES), instrumental surface temperature observations from NASA GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP), atmospheric reanalysis data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts interim reanalysis (ERA-I) and surface temperature reconstructions over the past millennium from numerous multiproxy archives.</p><p>This work has yielded six primary conclusions: I) Dynamics over the tropical Pacific Ocean represent the primary contributor to unforced GMST variability at interdecadal and longer timescales with lesser contributions from dynamics in the subpolar north Atlantic and Southern Ocean. II) AOGCMs tend to underestimate the magnitude of unforced GMST variability at interdecadal and longer timescales relative to both instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature datasets. III) N imbalances can act to significantly enhance interdecadal GMST variability. IV) GMST is able to restore equilibrium after an internally generated perturbation via the transport of energy to high-latitude locations and via the rearrangement the atmospheric circulation; both of which allow for much more efficient release of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) than would otherwise be expected. V) N imbalances can significantly enhance internal modes of variability such as the AMO; and VI) The magnitude of interdecadal GMST variability is likely to decline and the generating mechanisms of such variability may be fundamentally altered as climate warms over the 21st century. These results advance our understanding of unforced GMST variability and they have implications for attribution studies and may inform projections of climate change on interdecadal timescales.</p> / Dissertation
4

Le niveau de la mer actuel : variations globales et régionales / Present day sea level : global and regional variations

Kulaiappan Palanisamy, Hindumathi 06 January 2016 (has links)
Le niveau de la mer est une des variables climatiques essentielles dont la variabilité résulte de nombreuses interactions complexes entre toutes les composantes du système climatique sur une large gamme d'échelles spatiales et temporelles. Au cours du XXème siècle, les mesures marégraphiques ont permis d'estimer la hausse du niveau de la mer global entre 1,6 mm/an et 1,8 mm/an. Depuis 1993, les observations faites par les satellites altimétriques indiquent une hausse du niveau de la mer plus rapide de 3,3 mm/an. Grâce à leur couverture quasi-globale, elles révèlent aussi une forte variabilité du niveau de la mer à l'échelle régionale, parfois plusieurs fois supérieure à la moyenne globale du niveau de la mer. Compte tenu de l'impact très négatif de l'augmentation du niveau de la mer pour la société, sa surveillance, la compréhension de ses causes ainsi que sa prévision sont désormais considérées comme des priorités scientifiques et sociétales majeures. Dans cette thèse, nous validons d'abord les variations du niveau de la mer mesurées par la nouvelle mission d'altimétrie satellitaire, SARAL-AltiKa, en comparant les mesures avec celles de Jason- 2 et des marégraphes. Un autre volet de cette première partie de thèse a consisté à estimer les parts respectives des facteurs responsables des variations du niveau de la mer depuis 2003 en utilisant des observations issues de l'altimétrie satellitaire (missions altimétrique Jason-1, Jason-2 et Envisat), de la mission GRACE, et des profils de température et salinité de l'océan par les flotteurs Argo. Une attention particulière est portée à la contribution de l'océan profond non 'vue' par Argo. Nous montrons que les incertitudes dues aux approches du traitement des données et aux erreurs systématiques des différents systèmes d'observation nous empêchent encore d'obtenir des résultats précis sur cette contribution. Dans la deuxième partie de la thèse, en utilisant les données de reconstruction du niveau de la mer dans le passé, nous étudions la variabilité régionale du niveau de la mer et estimons sa hausse totale (composante régionale plus moyenne globale) de 1950 à 2009 dans trois régions vulnérables: l'océan Indien, la mer de Chine méridionale et la mer des Caraïbes. Pour les sites où l'on dispose de mesures du mouvement de la croûte terrestre par GPS, nous évaluons la hausse locale du niveau de la mer relatif (hausse du niveau de la mer totale plus mouvement de la croûte locale) depuis 1950. En comparant les résultats de ces trois régions avec une étude précédente sur le Pacifique tropical, nous constatons que le Pacifique tropical présente la plus forte amplitude des variations du niveau de la mer sur la période d'étude. Dans la dernière partie de la thèse, nous nous concentrons par conséquent sur le Pacifique tropical. Nous analysons les rôles respectifs de la dynamique océanique, des modes de variabilité interne du climat et du forçage anthropique sur les structures de la variabilité régionale du niveau de la mer du Pacifique tropical depuis 1993. Nous montrons qu'une partie importante de la variabilité régionale du niveau de la mer du Pacifique tropical peut être expliquée par le mouvement vertical de la thermocline en réponse à l'action du vent. En tentant de séparer le signal correspondant au mode de variabilité interne du climat de celui de la hausse régionale du niveau de la mer dans le Pacifique tropical, nous montrons également que le signal résiduel restant (c'est-à-dire le signal total moins le signal de variabilité interne) ne correspond probablement pas à l'empreinte externe du forçage anthropique. / Sea level is an integrated climate parameter that involves interactions of all components of the climate system (oceans, ice sheets, glaciers, atmosphere, and land water reservoirs) on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Over the 20th century, tide gauge records indicate a rise in global sea level between 1.6mm/yr and 1.8 mm/yr. Since 1993, sea level variations have been measured precisely by satellite altimetry. They indicate a faster sea level rise of 3.3 mm/yr over 1993-2015. Owing to their global coverage, they also reveal a strong regional sea level variability that sometimes is several times greater than the global mean sea level rise. Considering the highly negative impact of sea level rise for society, monitoring sea level change and understanding its causes are henceforth high priorities. In this thesis, we first validate the sea level variations measured by the new satellite altimetry mission, SARAL-AltiKa by comparing the measurements with Jason-2 and tide gauge records. We then attempt to close the global mean sea level budget since 2003 and estimate the deep ocean contribution by making use of observational data from satellite altimetry, Argo profiles and GRACE mission. We show that uncertainties due to data processing approaches and systematic errors of different observing systems still prevent us from obtaining accurate results. In the second part of the thesis, by making use of past sea level reconstruction, we study the patterns of the regional sea level variability and estimate climate related (global mean plus regional component) sea level change over 1950-2009 at three vulnerable regions: Indian Ocean, South China and Caribbean Sea. For the sites where vertical crustal motion monitoring is available, we compute the total relative sea level (i.e. total sea level rise plus the local vertical crustal motion) since 1950. On comparing the results from these three regions with already existing results in tropical Pacific, we find that tropical Pacific displays the highest magnitude of sea level variations. In the last part of the thesis, we therefore focus on the tropical Pacific and analyze the respective roles of ocean dynamic processes, internal climate modes and external anthropogenic forcing on tropical Pacific sea level spatial trend patterns since 1993. Building up on the relationship between thermocline and sea level in the tropical region, we show that most of the observed sea level spatial trend pattern in the tropical Pacific can be explained by the wind driven vertical thermocline movement. By performing detection and attribution study on sea level spatial trend patterns in the tropical Pacific and attempting to eliminate signal corresponding to the main internal climate mode, we further show that the remaining residual sea level trend pattern does not correspond to externally forced anthropogenic sea level signal. In addition, we also suggest that satellite altimetry measurement may not still be accurate enough to detect the anthropogenic signal in the 20 year tropical Pacific sea level trends.
5

Variations actuelles du niveau de la mer / Present day sea level variations

Dieng, Habib Boubacar 10 January 2017 (has links)
Depuis le début des années 1990 on suit l'évolution globale du niveau de la mer grâce aux satellites altimétriques. Ils observent une hausse du niveau moyen global de la mer (GMSL) de 3.4 ± 0.4 mm/an sur la période 1993-2016 (ce qui représente le double de ce qui a été observé au cours du 20ème siècle par les marégraphes, hausse à 1.7 mm/an entre 1900 et 1990). Le GMSL présente aussi des fluctuations interannuelles qui peuvent atteindre quelques millimètres, surtout pendant les épisodes ENSO. Cette hausse n'est pas régionalement uniforme : elle a été 3 fois plus rapide que la hausse moyenne globale dans certaines zones entre 1993 et 2016. Au cours du 21ème siècle, on s'attend à une hausse accrue du GMSL pouvant aller jusqu'à 1 m à l'horizon 2100, avec une forte variabilité régionale. Il est donc important de comprendre l'évolution actuelle du niveau des océans qui constitue une menace sérieuse pour de nombreuses régions côtières basses souvent très peuplées. Cette thèse s'inscrit dans le contexte du projet niveau de la mer CCI (Climate Change Initiative) de l'Agence Spatiale Européenne (ESA) ayant pour objectif de fournir de meilleurs produits du niveau de la mer combinant les missions Topex/Poseidon, Jason-1/2, ERS-1/2 et Envisat. L'objectif premier de cette thèse est de valider ces produits SL_CCI du niveau de la mer en utilisant différentes approches, en particulier par l'étude du bilan (comparaison du GMSL observé avec la somme des différentes contributions : composante stérique, fonte des glaces continentales et transferts d'eau depuis les terres émergées). Un autre objectif est d'estimer les composantes du niveau de la mer mal connues, et tout particulièrement le contenu thermique de l'océan profond non mesurable par le système Argo, et la contribution du stock d'eau sur les continents. Ces travaux ont montré que la contribution de l'océan profond en dessous de 2000m est faible sur la période 2005-2013 et contenue dans la barre d'incertitudes des données (erreurs qui proviennent essentiellement, (1) des produits niveau de la mer altimétriques et des lacunes de la couverture géographique des données Argo dans la région Indonésienne pour la tendance et (2) des produits GRACE et Argo pour la variabilité interannuelle). Nos résultats et la méthode utilisée montrent que le niveau de la mer et ses composantes sont encore entachés d'erreurs importantes. Dans la deuxième partie, nous avons analysé l'influence du phénomène ENSO (El Niño et La Niña) sur les variations interannuelles du GMSL. Nous montrons que lors des évènements La Niña comme celui de 2010-2011, le déficit de précipitations sur l'océan (et l'excès sur les continents) conduit à une baisse temporaire de la masse de l'océan global et donc du niveau de la mer. C'est essentiellement la variation de masse de l'océan qui explique la variabilité interannuelle du niveau de la mer lors des évènements ENSO, et le déficit (La Niña) ou excès (El Niño) de masse se trouve confiné dans l'océan Pacifique tropical Nord. Pour finir, nous analysons l'évolution de la température moyenne de l'air et de l'océan en surface sur la période du "hiatus" (2003-2013). Nous montrons que ce hiatus, c'est à dire le ralentissement récent de la hausse de la température moyenne globale de la Terre est un phénomène quasi global, même si le Pacifique tropical Est s'est fortement refroidi. Cette "supposée" pause récente s'explique par la variabilité naturelle interne du climat. La Terre est toujours en état de déséquilibre énergétique dû à l'accumulation de gaz à effet de serre. Nous mettons en évidence le rôle de la variabilité naturelle à court terme sur les changements à plus long terme associés au réchauffement climatique anthropique. / Since the early 1990s sea level is routinely measured using high-precision altimeter satellites. These observe a rise in global mean sea level (GMSL) of 3.4 ± 0.4 mm/yr over the 1993-2016 period (which is twice what has been observed during the 20th century by the tide gauges, with a rise of 1.7 +/- 0.3 mm/yr). The interannual variability in the GMSL can reach several millimeters, especially during ENSO events. The rate of sea level rise is not regionally uniform. During the altimetry era, it was three times faster than the global mean in some areas. During the 21st century, we expect a greater rise of the GMSL than today, up to 1 m in 2100, with strong regional variability. It is therefore important to understand the current evolution of the sea level, since it represents a serious threat to many low coastal areas, often densely populated of the planet. My thesis research deals with the Sea Level CCI (Climate Change Initiative) project of the European Space Agency (ESA) which objective is to provide improved sea level products combining several altimetry missions, including Topex/Poseidon, Jason-1/2, ERS-1/2 and Envisat. The primary objective of my thesis was to validate the CCI sea level products using different approaches, in particular the sea level budget approach. It consists of comparing the observed GMSL with the sum of different contributions : the steric component, melting of continental ice and transfers of water between the land surface and oceans. Another objective was to estimate the poorly known components to sea level rise, in particular the heat content of the deep ocean not measurable by Argo, and the contribution of water storage on the land. My work has shown that the contribution of the deep ocean below 2000m to the rising sea level is small over the 2005-2013 periods and not significant compared to the data uncertainties. The main uncertainties come from: (1) -in terms of trend- the altimetry sea level products and gaps in the geographical coverage of Argo data in the Indonesian region, and (2) -in terms of interannual variability- the GRACE and Argo products. My results and the method used show that the sea level and its components are still affected by important errors. In the second part, I analyzed the influence of ENSO (El Niño and La Niña) on the interannual variations of the GMSL. I showed that during La Niña events, like that of 2010-2011, the rainfall deficit over the ocean (and excess over the continents) leads to a temporary decrease in the global ocean mass and therefore in the GMSL. This is essentially the ocean mass variation that explains the interannual variability of the GMSL during ENSO events. Furthermore, the deficit (La Niña) or excess (El Niño) ocean mass is confined in the north tropical Pacific Ocean. Finally, I analyzed the evolution of the average temperature of air and ocean surface over the period of the "hiatus" (2003-2013). I showed that this hiatus, i.e. the recent slowdown in the rise of the global mean Earth's temperature is an almost global phenomenon, though cooling of the tropical eastern Pacific has slightly contributed. This recent pause is attributable to natural internal climate variability. The Earth is indeed still in a state of energetic imbalance due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. I highlighted the role of the natural variability that is superimposed to the anthropogenic global warming.

Page generated in 0.067 seconds