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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Te Ao o te whaikōrero

Rewi, Poia, n/a January 2005 (has links)
Te Ao o te Whaikōrero, the �world of Māori oratory�, explores the complexity of ̂Māori oratory, both past and present. What makes whaikōrero more than merely a theatrical speech is the origin and function of the various components, the rites associated with the selection and qualification of its exponents, and its delivery. This thesis delves into the underlying philosophies inherent in whaikōrero which impact on, and are influenced by, a diverse range of systems within the Māori world, its culture, etiquette, and belief system. We must also recognise the effect of colonisation and urbanisation on Māori practices. Whaikōrero is tragically undermined by some of its �performers� and observers alike, and possibly, through ignorance, arrogance and complacency, a sense of disregard has developed about its true value. The effect of this is whaikōrero of inferior quality. With this in mind, this thesis expounds the �underlying philosophies� of whaikōrero through both oral and literary sources, as well as objective and subjective discussion. The chapters illustrate the inter-tribal, intra-tribal, and individual variations which make each delivery of whaikōrero unique. The thesis begins with the origin of whaikōrero, after which modes of learning and the acquisition of whaikōrero are discussed. This provides the basis to discuss the locations where whaikōrero takes place and who is permitted to deliver whaikōrero. Having designated the people to deliver whaikōrero and their �space� for delivery there is an exploration of the speaker, and the attributes which qualify a particular individual, or the type of delivery that is acceptable. The issue of �quality�, or lack of it, is of paramount importance in terms of the mana of the individual performer, and the people (s)he represents. The range of information discussed up to this point is historical and tracks the evolution of whaikōrero to the present; the conclusion, therefore, also addresses some of the issues raised which are potentially challenging in regard to current adherence to custom and etiquette. This opens the window into the future of whaikōrero, and what adaptations may lie ahead. Perhaps with broader, and more in-depth discussion, and in particular, the explanation of the diversity of whaikōrero, this thesis will provide a) a means by which the spirit of older whaikōrero can be reinvested in the modern context by current and potential orators, and b) raise the awareness of speakers whereby they themselves can seek excellence in their own whaikōrero. Perhaps with an invigorated approach to both the delivery, observance, and a more informed appreciation of whaikōrero, there will be a resurgence of excellence in whaikōrero.
2

Te Ao o te whaikōrero

Rewi, Poia, n/a January 2005 (has links)
Te Ao o te Whaikōrero, the �world of Māori oratory�, explores the complexity of ̂Māori oratory, both past and present. What makes whaikōrero more than merely a theatrical speech is the origin and function of the various components, the rites associated with the selection and qualification of its exponents, and its delivery. This thesis delves into the underlying philosophies inherent in whaikōrero which impact on, and are influenced by, a diverse range of systems within the Māori world, its culture, etiquette, and belief system. We must also recognise the effect of colonisation and urbanisation on Māori practices. Whaikōrero is tragically undermined by some of its �performers� and observers alike, and possibly, through ignorance, arrogance and complacency, a sense of disregard has developed about its true value. The effect of this is whaikōrero of inferior quality. With this in mind, this thesis expounds the �underlying philosophies� of whaikōrero through both oral and literary sources, as well as objective and subjective discussion. The chapters illustrate the inter-tribal, intra-tribal, and individual variations which make each delivery of whaikōrero unique. The thesis begins with the origin of whaikōrero, after which modes of learning and the acquisition of whaikōrero are discussed. This provides the basis to discuss the locations where whaikōrero takes place and who is permitted to deliver whaikōrero. Having designated the people to deliver whaikōrero and their �space� for delivery there is an exploration of the speaker, and the attributes which qualify a particular individual, or the type of delivery that is acceptable. The issue of �quality�, or lack of it, is of paramount importance in terms of the mana of the individual performer, and the people (s)he represents. The range of information discussed up to this point is historical and tracks the evolution of whaikōrero to the present; the conclusion, therefore, also addresses some of the issues raised which are potentially challenging in regard to current adherence to custom and etiquette. This opens the window into the future of whaikōrero, and what adaptations may lie ahead. Perhaps with broader, and more in-depth discussion, and in particular, the explanation of the diversity of whaikōrero, this thesis will provide a) a means by which the spirit of older whaikōrero can be reinvested in the modern context by current and potential orators, and b) raise the awareness of speakers whereby they themselves can seek excellence in their own whaikōrero. Perhaps with an invigorated approach to both the delivery, observance, and a more informed appreciation of whaikōrero, there will be a resurgence of excellence in whaikōrero.
3

Marae : a whakapapa of the Maori marae : a thesis submitted [in fulfilment of the requirements] for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in [Cultural Studies] at the University of Canterbury /

Bennett, Adrian John Te Piki Kotuku. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Canterbury, 2007. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 268-284). Also available via the World Wide Web.
4

Early Maori religious movements : a study of the reactions of the Maoris to the Christian Gospel up to 1860.

Begg, Alison Margaret, n/a January 1974 (has links)
Summary: An astonishing array of religious inventions and religious movements among the Maoris before 1860 is yielded by a study of contemporary written material. Although often ephemeral and localised in character, these movements nevertheless indicate some of the problems caused by the introduction of Christianity, and some of the problems that the introduction of Christianity did not solve. The purpose of this thesis is to collate some of this information and to consider why these movements arose...
5

Field work in Maori music (a preliminary study)

McLean, Mervyn, n/a January 1958 (has links)
Summary: This thesis embodies the results of field work in Maori music carried out in the Rotorua district between May and July 1958 when some 87 songs were recorded. Of these, only two (Nos. 20 and 21) show obvious signs of European influence and this was acknowledged in both cases. The remaining songs must be regarded as genuine examples of indigenous Maori music. They display many of the characteristics common to the music of native races throughtout the world but as will be shown many characteristics also which are uniquely Maori. The subject matter of the thesis is solely concerned with the songs recorded and with facts made known to me by informants. Instrumental music, which is now virtually extinct is not treated here. The historical approach through existing writings on Maori music has also been deliberately neglected. For this reason I have not thought it necessary to include the usual bibliography. Announcements concerning the songs were mostly made by the performers themselves in the Maori language. Performers were asked to give the name and type of song, own name and tribe, name and tribe of composer and anything they could recall of interest about the history and background of the song. If essential information was left out it was an elicited by question and answer dialogue at the end of the song. It was thought best for the announcements to be in Maori (even though this necessitated later translation) since performers were naturally most fluent and most at home in their own language. Had they been required to announce the songs in English less information might have been obtained. In addition, the impromptu speech about the song at the beginning of the performance puts the performers at ease - since it is very much in the usual tradition - and enables the investigator to be as unobtrusive as possible. Too many questions can upset the performers.
6

Ko te kohika turuturu = (The enduring collection)

Williams, Jim, n/a January 1997 (has links)
Ko te kookoomuka te raakau i tunua ai te moa. (There is a proper use for everything and only by means of correct useage can the optimum result be obtained) This thesis proposes a model for research into traditional Maori kaupapa. Maori Studies is interdisciplinary in that it combines aspects of a considerable number of other disciplines and adds a further perspective of its own. However, despite the cross-overs with, for example, Anthropology, History, Linguistics, Art History, etc., Maori Studies provides its own unique, emic prespective which adds both depth and breadth to the study. Accordingly, research into kaupapa Maori requires a Maori model which draws from associated disciplines, forms interpretations according to the Maori world view and integrates all the various forms of evidence so that gaps in one area may be filled from another. Some steps towards resolution are proposed where the different forms of evidence seem to contradict, rather than complement each other. In particular the etic versus emic approach is examined with a view. Accordingly, the thesis will include an approach to the analysis and incorporation of traditional information available from: interviews; art; waiata; whakataukii; placenames; whakapapa; manuscripts and early census figures as well as the publised sources which are available. All must be compared with the contemporary oral record of past events, especially since much Maori tradition is political in nature, and the political perspective can change over time ("The Maori Camel"-paper presented to Pouhere Korero/NZHA Conference February 1996). (One of the particular strengths of Maori language material such as placenames, waiata, whakapapa, and whakatauki is that they have usually been repeated verbatim, often by people who hadn�t the language ability to change them. Therefore, like manuscripts they are frozen in time; unlike contemporary oral evidence where stories are retold in each generation.) The case studies look at the traditional Maori perspective on each of the topics and compares it with any research which has been done in Non-Maori ways. (For example, in Case Study 1., Maori knowledge which has been gathered by following the model proposed in this thesis is compared with botanical knowledge about cabbage trees.) Maori language material is not translated but handled in the original and discussed in Maori when a more productive discussion is thus facilitated, therefore resulting in a bi-lingual thesis. For Maori Studies to be fully accepted as having the same mana as other academic disciplines requires full acceptance of the bilingual nature of Maori Studies. However, in the iterests [sic] of wider accessibility, the majority of the discussion will be in English.
7

Ko te kohika turuturu = (The enduring collection)

Williams, Jim, n/a January 1997 (has links)
Ko te kookoomuka te raakau i tunua ai te moa. (There is a proper use for everything and only by means of correct useage can the optimum result be obtained) This thesis proposes a model for research into traditional Maori kaupapa. Maori Studies is interdisciplinary in that it combines aspects of a considerable number of other disciplines and adds a further perspective of its own. However, despite the cross-overs with, for example, Anthropology, History, Linguistics, Art History, etc., Maori Studies provides its own unique, emic prespective which adds both depth and breadth to the study. Accordingly, research into kaupapa Maori requires a Maori model which draws from associated disciplines, forms interpretations according to the Maori world view and integrates all the various forms of evidence so that gaps in one area may be filled from another. Some steps towards resolution are proposed where the different forms of evidence seem to contradict, rather than complement each other. In particular the etic versus emic approach is examined with a view. Accordingly, the thesis will include an approach to the analysis and incorporation of traditional information available from: interviews; art; waiata; whakataukii; placenames; whakapapa; manuscripts and early census figures as well as the publised sources which are available. All must be compared with the contemporary oral record of past events, especially since much Maori tradition is political in nature, and the political perspective can change over time ("The Maori Camel"-paper presented to Pouhere Korero/NZHA Conference February 1996). (One of the particular strengths of Maori language material such as placenames, waiata, whakapapa, and whakatauki is that they have usually been repeated verbatim, often by people who hadn�t the language ability to change them. Therefore, like manuscripts they are frozen in time; unlike contemporary oral evidence where stories are retold in each generation.) The case studies look at the traditional Maori perspective on each of the topics and compares it with any research which has been done in Non-Maori ways. (For example, in Case Study 1., Maori knowledge which has been gathered by following the model proposed in this thesis is compared with botanical knowledge about cabbage trees.) Maori language material is not translated but handled in the original and discussed in Maori when a more productive discussion is thus facilitated, therefore resulting in a bi-lingual thesis. For Maori Studies to be fully accepted as having the same mana as other academic disciplines requires full acceptance of the bilingual nature of Maori Studies. However, in the iterests [sic] of wider accessibility, the majority of the discussion will be in English.
8

Land, authority and the forgetting of being in early colonial Maori history : a thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Maori in the University of Canterbury /

Head, Lyndsay. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Canterbury, 2006. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 321-327). Also available via the World Wide Web.
9

Collaborative research stories : whakawhanaungatanga

Bishop, Alan Russell, n/a January 1995 (has links)
This thesis seeks to acknowledge and address the concerns that Maori people voice about research into their lives. The present study shows that Maori people are concerned that the power and control over research issues of initiation, benefits, representation, legitimation and accountability are addressed by the imposition of the researcher�s agenda, concerns and interests on the research process. Such dominance of a Western orientated discourse is being challenged by a pro-active, Kaupapa Maori research approach. This approach is part of the revitalisation of Maori cultural aspirations, preferences and practices as a philosophical and productive educational stance and resistance to the hegemony of the dominant discourse in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Kaupapa Maori research is collectivistic, and is orientated toward benefiting all the research participants and their collectively determined agendas. Kaupapa Maori Research is based on growing concensus that research involving Maori knowledge and people needs to be conducted in culturally appropriate ways, ways that fit Maori cultural preferences, practices and aspirations in order to develop and acknowledge existing culturally appropriate approaches in the method, practice and organisation of research. This thesis examines how a group of researchers have addressed the importance of devolving power and control in the research exercise in order to promote self-determination (tino Rangatiratanga) of Maori people. In the thesis I have talked with researchers who have accepted the challenge of positioning themselves within the discursive practice that is Kaupapa Maori. As a result, this thesis examines how such positionings challenge what constitutes a process of theory generation within the context of Aotearoa/New Zealand. This thesis further seeks to examine a way of knowing that reflects what meanings I can construct from my positioning within an experiential Kaupapa Maori research matrix. My position within this matrix resulted from critical reflections on my participation in a research group with an agreed-to agenda, my participation within the projects considered in the narratives in this thesis, my talking with other research participants in the form termed "interviews as chat" and from our constructing joint narratives about their/our attempts to address Maori concerns about research in their practice. The broad methodological framework used in the thesis is narrative inquiry for such an approach allows the research participants to select, recollect and reflect on stories within their own cultural context and language rather than in that chosen by the researcher. In other words, the story teller maintains the power to define what constitutes the story and the truth and the meaning it has for them. Further, this thesis seeks to investigate my own position as a researcher within a co-joint reflection on shared experiences and co-joint construction of meanings about these experiences, a position where the stories of the other research participants merged with my own to create new stories. Such collaborative stories go beyond an approach that simply focusses on the cooperative sharing of experiences and focusses on connectedness, engagement, and involvement with the other research participants within the cultural world view/discursive practice within which they function. This thesis seeks to identify what constitutes this engagement and what implications this has for promoting self determination/agency/voice in the research participants by examining concepts of participatory consciousness and connectedness within Maori discursive practice. Whakawhanaungatanga (establishing relationships in a Maori context), is used metaphorically to give voice to a culturally positioned means of collaboratively constructing research stories in a �culturally conscious and connected manner�. The thesis explains that there are three major overlapping implications of whakawhanaungatanga as a research strategy. The first is that establishing and maintaining relationships is a fundamental, often extensive and ongoing part of the research process. This involves the establishment of �whanau of interest� through a process of �spiral dicourse�. The second is that researchers understand themselves to be involved somatically in the research process; that is physically, ethically, morally and spiritually and not just as a �researcher� concerned with methodology. Such positionings are demonstrated in the language/metaphor used by the researchers in the stories described in this thesis. The third is that establishing relationships in a Maori context addresses the power and control issues fundamental to research, because it involves participatory research practices, in this context, termed �Participant Driven research�.
10

Collaborative research stories : whakawhanaungatanga

Bishop, Alan Russell, n/a January 1995 (has links)
This thesis seeks to acknowledge and address the concerns that Maori people voice about research into their lives. The present study shows that Maori people are concerned that the power and control over research issues of initiation, benefits, representation, legitimation and accountability are addressed by the imposition of the researcher�s agenda, concerns and interests on the research process. Such dominance of a Western orientated discourse is being challenged by a pro-active, Kaupapa Maori research approach. This approach is part of the revitalisation of Maori cultural aspirations, preferences and practices as a philosophical and productive educational stance and resistance to the hegemony of the dominant discourse in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Kaupapa Maori research is collectivistic, and is orientated toward benefiting all the research participants and their collectively determined agendas. Kaupapa Maori Research is based on growing concensus that research involving Maori knowledge and people needs to be conducted in culturally appropriate ways, ways that fit Maori cultural preferences, practices and aspirations in order to develop and acknowledge existing culturally appropriate approaches in the method, practice and organisation of research. This thesis examines how a group of researchers have addressed the importance of devolving power and control in the research exercise in order to promote self-determination (tino Rangatiratanga) of Maori people. In the thesis I have talked with researchers who have accepted the challenge of positioning themselves within the discursive practice that is Kaupapa Maori. As a result, this thesis examines how such positionings challenge what constitutes a process of theory generation within the context of Aotearoa/New Zealand. This thesis further seeks to examine a way of knowing that reflects what meanings I can construct from my positioning within an experiential Kaupapa Maori research matrix. My position within this matrix resulted from critical reflections on my participation in a research group with an agreed-to agenda, my participation within the projects considered in the narratives in this thesis, my talking with other research participants in the form termed "interviews as chat" and from our constructing joint narratives about their/our attempts to address Maori concerns about research in their practice. The broad methodological framework used in the thesis is narrative inquiry for such an approach allows the research participants to select, recollect and reflect on stories within their own cultural context and language rather than in that chosen by the researcher. In other words, the story teller maintains the power to define what constitutes the story and the truth and the meaning it has for them. Further, this thesis seeks to investigate my own position as a researcher within a co-joint reflection on shared experiences and co-joint construction of meanings about these experiences, a position where the stories of the other research participants merged with my own to create new stories. Such collaborative stories go beyond an approach that simply focusses on the cooperative sharing of experiences and focusses on connectedness, engagement, and involvement with the other research participants within the cultural world view/discursive practice within which they function. This thesis seeks to identify what constitutes this engagement and what implications this has for promoting self determination/agency/voice in the research participants by examining concepts of participatory consciousness and connectedness within Maori discursive practice. Whakawhanaungatanga (establishing relationships in a Maori context), is used metaphorically to give voice to a culturally positioned means of collaboratively constructing research stories in a �culturally conscious and connected manner�. The thesis explains that there are three major overlapping implications of whakawhanaungatanga as a research strategy. The first is that establishing and maintaining relationships is a fundamental, often extensive and ongoing part of the research process. This involves the establishment of �whanau of interest� through a process of �spiral dicourse�. The second is that researchers understand themselves to be involved somatically in the research process; that is physically, ethically, morally and spiritually and not just as a �researcher� concerned with methodology. Such positionings are demonstrated in the language/metaphor used by the researchers in the stories described in this thesis. The third is that establishing relationships in a Maori context addresses the power and control issues fundamental to research, because it involves participatory research practices, in this context, termed �Participant Driven research�.

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