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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

EXPLORING HELP-SEEKING BY “PROBLEM GAMBLERS”, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS IN AFRICAN NOVA SCOTIAN COMMUNITIES

Njiwaji, Marok 23 March 2012 (has links)
There are significant gaps in research on gambling and problem gambling among people of African descent in Canada. In this qualitative research the author sought to explore the experiences and perceptions of African Nova Scotians who self-identify as “problem gamblers”, individuals who have been impacted by family members with gambling problems and African Nova Scotian community members. The author also examined the structural and cultural factors that influence help-seeking for African Nova Scotians with gambling problems. The results of the research revealed that problem gambling impacts individuals, family members and the African Nova Scotian community as a whole. African Nova Scotians’ perceptions of gambling, problem gambling and available treatment services prevented service accessibility for gambling related problems. Cultural and structural factors also prevented help-seeking among African Nova Scotians with gambling related problems, hence the underrepresentation of African Nova Scotians in treatment services. / This thesis focuses on the impact of problem gambling on African Nova Scotians and the factors that influence treatment accessibility for gambling related problems.
2

Beyond Recreational Gambling : a Psychological Perspective on Risk- and Problem Gambling

Sundqvist, Kristina January 2016 (has links)
The general aim of this thesis was to examine risk gambling in the general population from a psychological perspective. This was done in three studies targeting personality, risky alcohol habits and gambling motives, respectively. Initially, 19 530 randomly assigned Swedish citizens were screened for problem gambling via telephone using the two questions in the Lie/Bet questionnaire. This sample constitutes the basis for one of the studies in the thesis. For the other studies, individuals answering yes to one of the questions in the Lie/Bet questionnaire and agreeing to participate further were sent a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire included questions about gambling, personality and gambling motives.   Some of the main results showed that: Negative consequences of gambling were associated with higher levels of impulsivity and negative affectivity. Risk gamblers reported lower levels of negative affectivity compared to the general population. Compared to non-risk gamblers, twice as many of the risk gamblers reported weekly binge drinking during the past 12 months. This association, however, seemed to be explained by shared demographic characteristics, rather than by the risk gambling causing binge drinking. High risk gamblers more often reported that they gambled for the challenge and for coping reasons, compared to low risk gamblers. High risk gamblers had overall stronger motives for gambling. The results also indicated that the level of risk gambling was highly intertwined with gambling motives and could explain some differences in gambling motives between, for example, women/men and younger/older gamblers. One of the focal points in the discussion was that higher levels of negative affectivity may be a cause of elevated problems rather than a cause of risk gambling. Another issue discussed was that the level of risk- /problem gambling may be important to consider when comparing gambling motives across subgroups of gamblers.
3

Betting on Black and White: Race and the Making of Problem Gambling

Buckelew, Rose January 2015 (has links)
<p>Problem gambling, a fairly recent addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is estimated to affect between two and five percent of the US adult population (Volberg 2001). While present in all racial groups, this disorder is not evenly distributed, as Blacks are more likely than any other group to become problem gamblers (Welte et al. 2006). And while this pattern is consistent with those found with other disorders (Black 1984; Ford and Widiger 1989; Strakowski et al. 1993), it is important to note that thirty years ago, when the first study of problem gambling prevalence was conducted and the disease had only recently been institutionalized, there was no difference in rate of illness by race (Kallick et al. 1979). This dissertation aims to explore this phenomenon: the role of race in the making of problem of gambling. </p><p>Through a multi-site and multi-method approach, this study examines the assumed race neutrality of gambling addiction. By tracing the history of gambling policy and North Carolina's adoption of a lottery program, this study explores how the state further defined problem gambling as a mental illness. Following this, participant observation of state-sponsored problem gambling counselor training workshops provides insight into the ways racialized understandings of behavior are constructed and maintained through counselor education. To gain a sense of how gambling is lived, this study involves participant observation of lottery gambling in convenience stores to interrogate racialized conceptions of behavior and reveal how financial gain motivates gambling across groups.</p> / Dissertation
4

Impacts of Casino Gambling Availability in Plainville, Massachusetts: A Repeated Cross-sectional Analysis

Venne, Danielle M 12 July 2018 (has links)
The impacts of the introduction of casino gambling in Plainville, MA and surrounding communities are of interest in developing informed policy. Problem gambling is a public health issue as associated harms include physical and mental illness, impaired relationships with one’s close social network, impacts on school or work, financial difficulties and illegal behavior. The results of surveys prior to and after the introduction of the casino were used to evaluate potential differences in the prevalence of at-risk and problem gambling, associations amongst health and gambling behavior covariates with at-risk and problem gambling status by year, and changes of covariate relationships with at-risk and problem gambling between years (2014 Total n = 1,090; 2016 Total n = 999; Total N = 2,089). No change in prevalence of at-risk and problem gambling was observed. A borderline significant higher rate in casino gambling between survey years was observed for at-risk and problem gamblers. Future research should aim to explore the influence of gambling availability on vulnerable subgroups of the population to create fully informed policy.
5

You bet your life...and mine! Contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand

Perese, Lana January 2009 (has links)
Pacific peoples in New Zealand are identified as having the highest risk and prevalence of problem and pathological gambling behaviours. Despite increasing awareness of gambling related harms in New Zealand there is a dearth of research on Pacific gambling, the reasons for problem gambling and the risks gambling poses for these populations. This thesis examines contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling through the perceptions and in-depth understandings of thirty-two Samoan participants. Pacific research methodologies premised on Pacific epistemologies, practices and protocols provide the cultural framework that supports the qualitative methods used in this research. These cultural methodologies also provide the context within which data gathered is analysed, interpreted and discussed. The method used within this thesis is an amalgam of Pacific and grounded theory approaches. The research identifies Samoan cultural factors that play a major role in understanding contemporary Samoan gambling. It links the deep-rooted cultural understandings of va/teu le va that are associated with early Samoan games and sports with contemporary Samoan gambling behaviours and practices. The research provides cultural understandings of the complex conditions and processes within which contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling are embedded, constituted and differentiated for Samoan people in New Zealand. These understandings are used to explore the extent to which gambling impacts harm Samoan individuals, families and communities. The research also describes cultural factors that are associated with motivations for contemporary Samoan gambling. It demonstrates that concepts such as ‘winning’, ‘fundraising’ and ‘socialising’ act as primary motivations for engagement and explores ways in which these drivers challenge the va and teu le va that are inherent within fa’aSamoa. The potency of these new motivations is illustrated through consideration of cultural practices such as fa’alavelave, status acquisition, religion and hospitality. These factors are not only complex but they also play an important role in the initiation, development and maintenance of Samoan gambling. This thesis articulates a broad knowledge base of cultural factors, practices, influences and understandings that are associated with contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand. It highlights how Samoan (problem) gambling while often rationalised in terms of aiga enhancing precepts is in reality most often undermining and eroding of aiga values and practices. In light of these findings, contextually effective Samoan solutions incorporated into Public Health interventions are recommended as a means of addressing the alarming gambling-related issues facing Samoan people in New Zealand. A greater emphasis on aiga/familial interventions rather than focusing on individuals is crucial since aiga and close social networks are identified as playing an important role in the development and maintenance of gambling behaviour and can also be effective catalysts and supports for behavioural change. Further research is indicated to better understand and develop the knowledge-base on contemporary Samoan gambling with specific relevance to Samoan youth and adult populations in New Zealand. / Whole document restricted, but available by request to UoA members, use the feedback form to request access.
6

Association Studies of Personality Traits, Problem Gambling, and Serotonergic Gene Polymorphisms

Tong, Ryan 20 December 2011 (has links)
Problem gambling is the subclinical form of pathological gambling and both are characterized by difficulties in the limiting of money and time spent on gambling. Genetic and personality factors have been implicated in gambling disorders (PG). As PG is classified as an impulse-control disorder, the serotonin (5-HT) system has been suggested to be involved. We sought to better understand the complex relationship between personality traits, PG, and 5-HT genes. We investigated ten 5-HT candidate genes for association with PG and personality traits. We also examined personality traits for association with PG. We found that MAOA and HTR3A haplotypes were associated with Agreeableness and Conscientiousness personality domains, PG was associated with high Neuroticism and low Conscientiousness scores, and the MAOA gene may play a role in PG. Our findings contribute to the better understanding of how 5-HT genes may be involved in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying PG and personality.
7

Association Studies of Personality Traits, Problem Gambling, and Serotonergic Gene Polymorphisms

Tong, Ryan 20 December 2011 (has links)
Problem gambling is the subclinical form of pathological gambling and both are characterized by difficulties in the limiting of money and time spent on gambling. Genetic and personality factors have been implicated in gambling disorders (PG). As PG is classified as an impulse-control disorder, the serotonin (5-HT) system has been suggested to be involved. We sought to better understand the complex relationship between personality traits, PG, and 5-HT genes. We investigated ten 5-HT candidate genes for association with PG and personality traits. We also examined personality traits for association with PG. We found that MAOA and HTR3A haplotypes were associated with Agreeableness and Conscientiousness personality domains, PG was associated with high Neuroticism and low Conscientiousness scores, and the MAOA gene may play a role in PG. Our findings contribute to the better understanding of how 5-HT genes may be involved in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying PG and personality.
8

You bet your life...and mine! Contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand

Perese, Lana January 2009 (has links)
Pacific peoples in New Zealand are identified as having the highest risk and prevalence of problem and pathological gambling behaviours. Despite increasing awareness of gambling related harms in New Zealand there is a dearth of research on Pacific gambling, the reasons for problem gambling and the risks gambling poses for these populations. This thesis examines contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling through the perceptions and in-depth understandings of thirty-two Samoan participants. Pacific research methodologies premised on Pacific epistemologies, practices and protocols provide the cultural framework that supports the qualitative methods used in this research. These cultural methodologies also provide the context within which data gathered is analysed, interpreted and discussed. The method used within this thesis is an amalgam of Pacific and grounded theory approaches. The research identifies Samoan cultural factors that play a major role in understanding contemporary Samoan gambling. It links the deep-rooted cultural understandings of va/teu le va that are associated with early Samoan games and sports with contemporary Samoan gambling behaviours and practices. The research provides cultural understandings of the complex conditions and processes within which contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling are embedded, constituted and differentiated for Samoan people in New Zealand. These understandings are used to explore the extent to which gambling impacts harm Samoan individuals, families and communities. The research also describes cultural factors that are associated with motivations for contemporary Samoan gambling. It demonstrates that concepts such as ‘winning’, ‘fundraising’ and ‘socialising’ act as primary motivations for engagement and explores ways in which these drivers challenge the va and teu le va that are inherent within fa’aSamoa. The potency of these new motivations is illustrated through consideration of cultural practices such as fa’alavelave, status acquisition, religion and hospitality. These factors are not only complex but they also play an important role in the initiation, development and maintenance of Samoan gambling. This thesis articulates a broad knowledge base of cultural factors, practices, influences and understandings that are associated with contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand. It highlights how Samoan (problem) gambling while often rationalised in terms of aiga enhancing precepts is in reality most often undermining and eroding of aiga values and practices. In light of these findings, contextually effective Samoan solutions incorporated into Public Health interventions are recommended as a means of addressing the alarming gambling-related issues facing Samoan people in New Zealand. A greater emphasis on aiga/familial interventions rather than focusing on individuals is crucial since aiga and close social networks are identified as playing an important role in the development and maintenance of gambling behaviour and can also be effective catalysts and supports for behavioural change. Further research is indicated to better understand and develop the knowledge-base on contemporary Samoan gambling with specific relevance to Samoan youth and adult populations in New Zealand. / Whole document restricted, but available by request, use the feedback form to request access.
9

You bet your life...and mine! Contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand

Perese, Lana January 2009 (has links)
Pacific peoples in New Zealand are identified as having the highest risk and prevalence of problem and pathological gambling behaviours. Despite increasing awareness of gambling related harms in New Zealand there is a dearth of research on Pacific gambling, the reasons for problem gambling and the risks gambling poses for these populations. This thesis examines contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling through the perceptions and in-depth understandings of thirty-two Samoan participants. Pacific research methodologies premised on Pacific epistemologies, practices and protocols provide the cultural framework that supports the qualitative methods used in this research. These cultural methodologies also provide the context within which data gathered is analysed, interpreted and discussed. The method used within this thesis is an amalgam of Pacific and grounded theory approaches. The research identifies Samoan cultural factors that play a major role in understanding contemporary Samoan gambling. It links the deep-rooted cultural understandings of va/teu le va that are associated with early Samoan games and sports with contemporary Samoan gambling behaviours and practices. The research provides cultural understandings of the complex conditions and processes within which contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling are embedded, constituted and differentiated for Samoan people in New Zealand. These understandings are used to explore the extent to which gambling impacts harm Samoan individuals, families and communities. The research also describes cultural factors that are associated with motivations for contemporary Samoan gambling. It demonstrates that concepts such as ‘winning’, ‘fundraising’ and ‘socialising’ act as primary motivations for engagement and explores ways in which these drivers challenge the va and teu le va that are inherent within fa’aSamoa. The potency of these new motivations is illustrated through consideration of cultural practices such as fa’alavelave, status acquisition, religion and hospitality. These factors are not only complex but they also play an important role in the initiation, development and maintenance of Samoan gambling. This thesis articulates a broad knowledge base of cultural factors, practices, influences and understandings that are associated with contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand. It highlights how Samoan (problem) gambling while often rationalised in terms of aiga enhancing precepts is in reality most often undermining and eroding of aiga values and practices. In light of these findings, contextually effective Samoan solutions incorporated into Public Health interventions are recommended as a means of addressing the alarming gambling-related issues facing Samoan people in New Zealand. A greater emphasis on aiga/familial interventions rather than focusing on individuals is crucial since aiga and close social networks are identified as playing an important role in the development and maintenance of gambling behaviour and can also be effective catalysts and supports for behavioural change. Further research is indicated to better understand and develop the knowledge-base on contemporary Samoan gambling with specific relevance to Samoan youth and adult populations in New Zealand. / Whole document restricted, but available by request to UoA members, use the feedback form to request access.
10

You bet your life...and mine! Contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand

Perese, Lana January 2009 (has links)
Pacific peoples in New Zealand are identified as having the highest risk and prevalence of problem and pathological gambling behaviours. Despite increasing awareness of gambling related harms in New Zealand there is a dearth of research on Pacific gambling, the reasons for problem gambling and the risks gambling poses for these populations. This thesis examines contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling through the perceptions and in-depth understandings of thirty-two Samoan participants. Pacific research methodologies premised on Pacific epistemologies, practices and protocols provide the cultural framework that supports the qualitative methods used in this research. These cultural methodologies also provide the context within which data gathered is analysed, interpreted and discussed. The method used within this thesis is an amalgam of Pacific and grounded theory approaches. The research identifies Samoan cultural factors that play a major role in understanding contemporary Samoan gambling. It links the deep-rooted cultural understandings of va/teu le va that are associated with early Samoan games and sports with contemporary Samoan gambling behaviours and practices. The research provides cultural understandings of the complex conditions and processes within which contemporary Samoan gambling and problem gambling are embedded, constituted and differentiated for Samoan people in New Zealand. These understandings are used to explore the extent to which gambling impacts harm Samoan individuals, families and communities. The research also describes cultural factors that are associated with motivations for contemporary Samoan gambling. It demonstrates that concepts such as ‘winning’, ‘fundraising’ and ‘socialising’ act as primary motivations for engagement and explores ways in which these drivers challenge the va and teu le va that are inherent within fa’aSamoa. The potency of these new motivations is illustrated through consideration of cultural practices such as fa’alavelave, status acquisition, religion and hospitality. These factors are not only complex but they also play an important role in the initiation, development and maintenance of Samoan gambling. This thesis articulates a broad knowledge base of cultural factors, practices, influences and understandings that are associated with contemporary Samoan gambling in New Zealand. It highlights how Samoan (problem) gambling while often rationalised in terms of aiga enhancing precepts is in reality most often undermining and eroding of aiga values and practices. In light of these findings, contextually effective Samoan solutions incorporated into Public Health interventions are recommended as a means of addressing the alarming gambling-related issues facing Samoan people in New Zealand. A greater emphasis on aiga/familial interventions rather than focusing on individuals is crucial since aiga and close social networks are identified as playing an important role in the development and maintenance of gambling behaviour and can also be effective catalysts and supports for behavioural change. Further research is indicated to better understand and develop the knowledge-base on contemporary Samoan gambling with specific relevance to Samoan youth and adult populations in New Zealand. / Whole document restricted, but available by request to UoA members, use the feedback form to request access.

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