• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 147
  • 41
  • 23
  • 15
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 274
  • 117
  • 78
  • 62
  • 61
  • 42
  • 40
  • 38
  • 35
  • 31
  • 29
  • 28
  • 27
  • 27
  • 25
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

"Depression Is A Medical Condition": Exploring the Medicalization of Depression on SSRI Websites

Gawley, Adele 28 August 2007 (has links)
ABSTRACT “DEPRESSION IS A MEDICAL CONDITION”: EXPLORING THE MEDICALIZATION OF DEPRESSION ON SSRI WEBSITES Sociologists of medicine have become increasingly interested in mental health over the last two decades (Pilgrim and Rogers, 2005). Known as the “common cold” of mental illness, depression affects millions around the globe. The social understanding of depression has been shaped by a phenomenon known as medicalization, where an unusual behavior or state of being is labeled illness or disorder or disease, and addressed through rationalized medical intervention. The medicalization of depression is particularly evident on SSRI websites. SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) are a popular class of antidepressants used to treat depression. Pharmaceutical companies who manufacture these medications now advertise their products on the Internet, an increasingly popular source for health information. This thesis is a critical, empirical investigation of the medicalization of depression on SSRI websites. Five major research questions guide this study. First, how is depression portrayed on the websites? Second, what are the means used to construct this portrayal? Third, who is the apparent target audience? Fourth, what assumptions are made about this audience? Finally, what is absent from or silent in the websites? These questions are answered using an analytical framework called Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). This framework is both a theoretical orientation and a methodological process (Fairclough, 1992). This study reveals that medicalization has a strong impact on the portrayal of depression on the websites, and is the major perspective from which the issue is approached. The depressed person is seen to be affected by depression in a variety of ways, including being ill with a medical condition and at risk for further difficulty if treatment is not handled properly. A variety of means are used to construct the portrayal of depression, including structural means such as interactional controls, linguistic means such as word choices and meanings, and visual means such as the use of diagrams and caricatures. Embedded in the text are a number of indicators which highlight some apparent assumptions about the targeted audience, such as insurance coverage and general literacy. Absences or silences in the texts include a failure to discuss the prevention of depression. The most significant finding concerns “the symptom/side-effect” problem; this dilemma highlights the lack of clarity around definitions of recovery and mental health as well as the purpose of taking medications. It also reveals that, while the application of the medicalized perspective to depression is certainly useful given the efficacy of antidepressant drugs for many people, it is not infallible and requires careful critical consideration.
2

"Depression Is A Medical Condition": Exploring the Medicalization of Depression on SSRI Websites

Gawley, Adele 28 August 2007 (has links)
ABSTRACT “DEPRESSION IS A MEDICAL CONDITION”: EXPLORING THE MEDICALIZATION OF DEPRESSION ON SSRI WEBSITES Sociologists of medicine have become increasingly interested in mental health over the last two decades (Pilgrim and Rogers, 2005). Known as the “common cold” of mental illness, depression affects millions around the globe. The social understanding of depression has been shaped by a phenomenon known as medicalization, where an unusual behavior or state of being is labeled illness or disorder or disease, and addressed through rationalized medical intervention. The medicalization of depression is particularly evident on SSRI websites. SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) are a popular class of antidepressants used to treat depression. Pharmaceutical companies who manufacture these medications now advertise their products on the Internet, an increasingly popular source for health information. This thesis is a critical, empirical investigation of the medicalization of depression on SSRI websites. Five major research questions guide this study. First, how is depression portrayed on the websites? Second, what are the means used to construct this portrayal? Third, who is the apparent target audience? Fourth, what assumptions are made about this audience? Finally, what is absent from or silent in the websites? These questions are answered using an analytical framework called Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). This framework is both a theoretical orientation and a methodological process (Fairclough, 1992). This study reveals that medicalization has a strong impact on the portrayal of depression on the websites, and is the major perspective from which the issue is approached. The depressed person is seen to be affected by depression in a variety of ways, including being ill with a medical condition and at risk for further difficulty if treatment is not handled properly. A variety of means are used to construct the portrayal of depression, including structural means such as interactional controls, linguistic means such as word choices and meanings, and visual means such as the use of diagrams and caricatures. Embedded in the text are a number of indicators which highlight some apparent assumptions about the targeted audience, such as insurance coverage and general literacy. Absences or silences in the texts include a failure to discuss the prevention of depression. The most significant finding concerns “the symptom/side-effect” problem; this dilemma highlights the lack of clarity around definitions of recovery and mental health as well as the purpose of taking medications. It also reveals that, while the application of the medicalized perspective to depression is certainly useful given the efficacy of antidepressant drugs for many people, it is not infallible and requires careful critical consideration.
3

Birth Visionaries: An Examination of Unassisted Childbirth

Brown, Lauren Ashley January 2009 (has links)
Thesis advisor: Sharlene N. Hesse-Biber / Birth Visionaries: An Examination of Unassisted Childbirth By Lauren Ashley Brown Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber, Thesis Chair This exploratory study inquires into unassisted childbirth, the act of giving birth without the presence of any birth professional (doctor, midwife or doula). Unassisted birth is on the radical fringe of alternatives to the dominant techno-medical birth common in American hospitals today. My research questions are what are women's motivations for choosing unassisted childbirth and what is the lived experience of unassisted childbirth? I will answer these questions through nine in-depth interviews and a grounded theory data analysis. My approach comes from a focus on the everyday lived experience of women as problematic as well as insights from anthropology of birth and feminist postmodern sociology of knowledge. This study is relevant to public health policy on pregnancy and birth, to those working on questions of technology and culture, and to those concerned with how biosocial rituals shape embodied experience. My findings also contribute to research about power in contemporary society, specifically how the body can be a cite for social control and resistance. / Thesis (MA) — Boston College, 2009. / Submitted to: Boston College. Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. / Discipline: Sociology.
4

Rape as a Legitimate Medical event from 1800 - 1910

Schaub, Katherine Elizabeth 23 August 2013 (has links)
No description available.
5

Proceeding with Caution: The Medicalization of Chronic Back Pain

Renzhofer, Holly T. 09 September 2010 (has links)
No description available.
6

VOICE OF THE DRUG: INTERPRETING MEDICALIZED DISEMPOWERMENT IN WOMEN’S NARRATIVES OF DEPRESSION

Hoogen, Siri Rebecca 24 April 2006 (has links)
No description available.
7

DTC Advertising and Medicalization: Understanding the Way the Pharmaceutical Industry Selectively "Informs" Consumers

Goforth, Laura F 01 April 2013 (has links)
Direct-to-Consumer advertisements allow pharmaceutical companies to advertise prescription drugs directly to consumers. Increasingly, marketing executives employed by pharmaceutical companies are shifting the focus of these advertisements from promoting the drug as a product, to promoting illness in general. Pharmaceutical companies defend this movement saying the advertisements have an educational function to "inform" consumers.
8

The framing of infertility in Canadian print news

2014 October 1900 (has links)
Background: The theory of framing suggests that the media have the ability to influence how the public thinks about issues (Nelson, Oxley & Clawson, 1997; Chong & Druckman, 2007), by influencing what definitions, causal attributions, moral evaluations, and treatment recommendation the public considers applicable to an issue (Entman, 1993; Tewksbury & Scheufele, 2009). The theory of framing has been supported in studies of media representations of a variety of social issues. With particular relevance to this thesis, framing studies have suggested that health news often portrays the essence of health issues as highly alarming, with few efficacious treatment or coping options (Chang, 2012). The social issue this thesis focuses on specifically is infertility. Study 1: In Study 1, a content analysis is utilized to examine how Canadian print news frames infertility. One-hundred and fifty-seven Canadian print news articles that contained the key word “infertility” in the year 2012 were analyzed. Two independent coders read the articles, and coded each article using a predetermined coding strategy (Chang, 2012) for if/how infertility was framed with respect to: prevalence; need for alarm; severity; vulnerability; need for alertness; means of coping; causes; and possible solutions. Just over one-half of the articles employed alarm frames (n=80), and the vast majority of these met the criteria for categorization as high alarm (96%). The most commonly cited cause of infertility was delayed childbearing (41% of articles) and the most frequently presented way to cope with infertility was in vitro fertilization (IVF; 46% of articles). Infertility was most often constructed as a women’s issue. Study 2: Study 2 build on Study 1 by examining the influence that high alarm framing strategies in the presentation of infertility have on news consumer reactions to, and knowledge of, infertility issues. One hundred and thirty-nine male and female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to read news articles focusing on infertility judged to employ either high alarm framing strategies (high alarm condition, n=65) or low alarm framing strategies (low alarm condition, n=66). Participants in each condition read the assigned news articles and subsequently completed a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included measures of: fear of infertility, perceived severity of infertility, perceived vulnerability to infertility, worry about infertility, prevention efficacy, coping efficacy, and knowledge about infertility. The participants in the high alarm condition evidenced higher levels of perceived vulnerability to infertility (p = .04), and marginally higher levels of worry about infertility (p = .075) than those in the low alarm condition. In contrast, participants in the low alarm condition relayed higher levels of infertility related knowledge than those in the high alarm condition (p= .001). Discussion: Canadian print news portrays infertility as a serious, a prevalent, an alarming and predominantly a women’s disease, and presents IVF as the principal means of coping. This partial depiction of infertility may not be promoting informed reproductive decision-making. Print news portrayal of infertility using high alarm framing strategies may induce higher worry about infertility and heightened levels of perceived personal vulnerability to infertility, while neglecting to relay pertinent knowledge about infertility. Implications for the societal understanding of infertility and the potential repercussions for informed reproductive decision-making are discussed.
9

"I Wanna Know Where the Rule Book Is": YouTube as a Site of Counternarratives to Transnormativity

Miller, Jordan Forrest 06 January 2017 (has links)
In June 2015, Caitlyn Jenner created waves of excitement with her coming out announcement on the cover of Vanity Fair: “Call me Caitlyn.” From the perspective of critical trans politics, however, the heightened visibility of trans people in mainstream media does not call for unequivocal celebration. Though trans women of color, such as Laverne Cox and Janet Mock, are more visible in mainstream media than ever before, mainstream media still largely depicts trans people through white constructs of what it means to be trans, namely medicalized binary transitions. Many trans people who deviate from mainstream media’s depiction of trans people are creating their own media on YouTube to voice their lived experiences. I argue that while YouTube is a particularly accessible platform for trans people to challenge transnormativity, the reach of trans YouTubers’ messages are highly limited by the medium’s design and genre conventions.
10

Betting on Black and White: Race and the Making of Problem Gambling

Buckelew, Rose January 2015 (has links)
<p>Problem gambling, a fairly recent addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is estimated to affect between two and five percent of the US adult population (Volberg 2001). While present in all racial groups, this disorder is not evenly distributed, as Blacks are more likely than any other group to become problem gamblers (Welte et al. 2006). And while this pattern is consistent with those found with other disorders (Black 1984; Ford and Widiger 1989; Strakowski et al. 1993), it is important to note that thirty years ago, when the first study of problem gambling prevalence was conducted and the disease had only recently been institutionalized, there was no difference in rate of illness by race (Kallick et al. 1979). This dissertation aims to explore this phenomenon: the role of race in the making of problem of gambling. </p><p>Through a multi-site and multi-method approach, this study examines the assumed race neutrality of gambling addiction. By tracing the history of gambling policy and North Carolina's adoption of a lottery program, this study explores how the state further defined problem gambling as a mental illness. Following this, participant observation of state-sponsored problem gambling counselor training workshops provides insight into the ways racialized understandings of behavior are constructed and maintained through counselor education. To gain a sense of how gambling is lived, this study involves participant observation of lottery gambling in convenience stores to interrogate racialized conceptions of behavior and reveal how financial gain motivates gambling across groups.</p> / Dissertation

Page generated in 0.1317 seconds