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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

What is an effective school like in the Hong Kong context from a holistic perspective? /

Poon, Huen-wai. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M. Ed.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leaf 180-187).
2

What is an effective school like in the Hong Kong context from a holistic perspective?

Poon, Huen-wai. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.Ed.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 180-187). Also available in print.
3

Making Symbolic Meaning Through the Engagement of Intercultural Exchanges: The Relationship Between Intercultural Communication and Global Competnecy on a U.S. University Campus

Unknown Date (has links)
This study reveals how participants in cross-cultural programs engage in intercultural communication with one another and reflect on global competency. Researchers agree that many U.S. students graduating from universities today are not receiving the necessary tools to successfully work abroad. This study has two major research objectives: to examine the engagement of intercultural communication between two people from different cultures and their reflections on global competency. Data were collected from 10 participants who were paired up with a person(s) of a different culture in conversation partner programs. Semi-structured interviews, qualitative analysis, and software were other methods used. I use the symbolic interaction approach to examine the engagement of intercultural communication and how that relates to the global competency of students and community members participating in cross-cultural programs on a U.S. university campus. The symbolic interaction approach examines the symbols and meanings people have for things. Findings show that participants--U.S. and international students, scholars, and community members--engage in intercultural communication by two key methods: the initial cultural philosophy and the stating of cultural differences. Findings from the second research question, examining how global competency relates to intercultural communication, indicates that according to participants, self-awareness and cultural awareness are readily apparent. / A Thesis submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. / Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2009. / Date of Defense: September 29, 2009. / Symbolic Interactionism, Global Competency, Intercultural Communication / Includes bibliographical references. / Thomas Luschei, Professor Directing Thesis; Stacey Rutledge, Committee Member; Linda Schrader, Committee Member; Patrice Iatarola, Committee Member.
4

An Examination of Technical and Pedagogical Usability within the SuccessMaker Math Program

Unknown Date (has links)
Mathematics involves abstract concepts and students often find it difficult to understand this complex subject (Ramani & Patadia, 2012). In order to succeed and wrestle with the difficulties in math, students should use different approaches to learning mathematics such as computer-assisted instruction (CAI) (Ramani & Patadia, 2012). Schools have invested in CAI programs to supplement instruction and these programs are also used as means to generate data to inform “the degree to which students meet learning goals” (Halverson & Shapiro, 2012. p. 1). Computer programs that prove difficult to use, cannot be customized to the learner or have poor user-interface, do not provide users with the experiences they want (Halverson & Shapiro, 2012). The degree to which learners experience programs as easy to use has been defined as technical usability and, the degree to which learners experience programs as easy to learn has been defined as pedagogical usability (Nokelainen, 2006). The purpose of this mixed methods study is to examine students’ subjective technical and pedagogical usability experiences with the SuccessMaker (SME) CAI program because the presence of good usability features can reinforce skills and support learning. SME is an adaptive intervention tutorial program designed to supplement math and adjust instruction to meet students’ needs (Pearson Digital Learning, (n.d.). Additionally, SME states that students experience less frustration with the math lessons because the learning paths guide students to performance goals (Pearson Digital Learning, n.d.). A wealth of studies have measured student outcomes after using computer math programs. However, these studies were inconclusive and failed to take a holistic view of the processes and inputs involved in using computer programs. Moreover, within computer programs, digital skills and learning features are not always explicitly taught or measured in elementary schools; however, students are being required to use computers as supplements to math instruction. A paucity of studies have measured usability constructs, which can support successful experiences using computer programs. Further investigation warrants a usability study in order to maximize, and support time spent learning, because computer programs should be easy to use and easy to learn. This case study employs a mixed methods, non-experimental research design to examine students’ usability experiences with the SME CAI math program. The Pedagogically Meaningful Learning Questionnaire (PMLQ) (Nokelainen, 2005) was administered to fifth grade students to answer the first research question and examine the degree to which technical usability scales are present within SME. Three focus groups were also conducted to answer the second research question, and examine students’ subjective experiences with both technical and pedagogical usability constructs. Overall, the results of this investigation indicated that relevant information can be learned from students’ experiences with CAI programs. Findings from the PMLQ, on average, revealed neither good nor poor usability within the following scales: accessibility, learnability and memorability, user control, graphical layout, reliability and memory load. Findings from the PMLQ revealed poor usability within the help, consistency, errors, and efficiency scales. Findings from the focus groups revealed good usability within the applicability, graphical layout, reliability constructs, and poor usability within learner control, learner activity, goal orientation, added value, motivation, valuation of previous knowledge, flexibility and feedback constructs as a result of subjective student experiences. The identification of good usability features has implications for supporting the ease of use and learning within the SME math CAI program. Conversely, the identification of poor usability features has implications for inhibiting the ease of learning within the SME math CAI program. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education. / Spring Semester 2018. / March 21, 2018. / computer assisted instruction, math, usability / Includes bibliographical references. / Courtney Preston, Professor Directing Dissertation; Fengfeng Ke, University Representative; Stacey Rutledge, Committee Member; Helen Boyle, Committee Member.
5

Teacher sharing in school administration.

Arnold, Dexter Otis January 1951 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Boston University.
6

Principal leadership behavior and teacher organizational commitment: a contingency approach.

January 1991 (has links)
Yuen Pong Yiu. / Thesis (M.A.Ed.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1991. / Bibliography: leaves 101-107. / Chapter IV. --- RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION / "Independent Contribution of Perceived Principal's Leadership Behaviors, Characteristics of Teacher, Nature of Teaching Task to Organizational Commitment" --- p.72 / Interactions between Perceived Principal's Leadership Behaviors and Component Variables of Moderators --- p.79 / Chapter V. --- "CONCLUSIONS, IMPLICATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS" / Conclusions --- p.93 / Implications --- p.96 / Recommendations --- p.98 / BIBLIOGRAPHY --- p.101 / APPENDICES / Chapter Appendix A : --- Background Information of Teachers --- p.108 / Chapter Appendix B : --- Managerial Behavior Survey --- p.109 / Chapter Appendix C : --- Substitute for Leadership --- p.111 / Chapter Appendix D : --- Locus of Control --- p.112 / Chapter Appendix E : --- Job Characteristics --- p.113 / Chapter Appendix F : --- Organizational Commitment --- p.114 / Chapter Appendix G : --- Preliminary Analysis --- p.115
7

study of multi-level self management in school =: 學校多層面自我管理的硏究. / 學校多層面自我管理的硏究 / A study of multi-level self management in school =: Xue xiao duo ceng mian zi wo guan li de yan jiu. / Xue xiao duo ceng mian zi wo guan li de yan jiu

January 1996 (has links)
by Cheung Wing-ming, Francis. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1996. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 422-451). / Text in English; Questionnaires in Chinese. / by Cheung Wing-ming, Francis. / Acknowledgements --- p.i / Table of Content --- p.ii / List of Tables --- p.vi / List of Figures --- p.ix / Abstract --- p.x / Chapter Chapter One --- Introduction / Chapter 1.1 --- Background --- p.1 / Chapter 1.2 --- Purpose of Study --- p.7 / Chapter 1.3 --- Significance of Study --- p.9 / Chapter 1.4 --- Organisation of Thesis --- p.12 / Chapter Chapter Two --- Review of Related Literature / Chapter 2.1 --- An Overview of Contemporary Policy and Implementation of Self Management in School --- p.14 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- Definition --- p.14 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Current trend of organisational management in the business and industrial sectors --- p.17 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- The development of self management in school --- p.20 / Chapter 2.1.4 --- Summary --- p.38 / Chapter 2.2 --- Self Management at the School Level --- p.40 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- Theoretical background --- p.40 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Characteristics of practice --- p.64 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Related research findings --- p.67 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- Summary --- p.70 / Chapter 2.3 --- Self Management of Staff in General --- p.73 / Chapter 2.4 --- Self Management at the Group Level --- p.77 / Chapter 2.4.1 --- Characteristics of self managing teams --- p.78 / Chapter 2.4.2 --- Group learning in organisation --- p.79 / Chapter 2.4.3 --- Team building --- p.82 / Chapter 2.4.4 --- Summary --- p.85 / Chapter 2.5 --- Self Management at the Individual Level --- p.87 / Chapter 2.5.1 --- Behaviour Characteristics of self managing individual --- p.89 / Chapter 2.5.2 --- Cognitive Characteristics of self managing individual --- p.91 / Chapter 2.5.3 --- Affective Characteristics of self managing individual --- p.95 / Chapter 2.5.4 --- Individual self management process --- p.96 / Chapter 2.5.5 --- Summary --- p.97 / Chapter Chapter Three --- Theoretical Framework / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.99 / Chapter 3.2 --- Self Management at the School Level --- p.100 / Chapter 3.3 --- Self Management at the Group Level --- p.109 / Chapter 3.4 --- Self Management at the Individual Staff Level --- p.115 / Chapter 3.5 --- Major and Support Cycles for Group and Individual Self Management --- p.123 / Chapter 3.6 --- An Overview --- p.128 / Chapter 3.7 --- "Self Management in School and Performance at the School, Group and Individual Levels" --- p.134 / Chapter 3.8 --- Research Questions --- p.140 / Chapter Chapter Four --- Research Methodology / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.144 / Chapter 4.2 --- Research Strategies --- p.145 / Chapter 4.3 --- Definitions --- p.148 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- School Self Management Strength --- p.148 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- Group Self Management Strength --- p.151 / Chapter 4.3.3 --- Individual Self Management Strength --- p.154 / Chapter 4.3.4 --- School Level Performance --- p.156 / Chapter 4.3.5 --- Group Level Performance --- p.157 / Chapter 4.3.6 --- Individual Level Performance --- p.157 / Chapter 4.3.7 --- Degree of congruence of self management practices --- p.158 / Chapter 4.3.8 --- Learning in self management cycles --- p.159 / Chapter 4.4 --- Pilot Study --- p.159 / Chapter 4.4.1 --- Case Studies --- p.159 / Chapter 4.4.2 --- Survey --- p.161 / Chapter 4.4.3 --- Refinement of conception and instruments --- p.162 / Chapter 4.4.4 --- Initial evidence collected in the pilot case study --- p.163 / Chapter 4.5 --- Cross-sectional Survey of the Main Study --- p.172 / Chapter 4.5.1 --- Null hypotheses --- p.172 / Chapter 4.5.2 --- Sampling --- p.175 / Chapter 4.5.3 --- Survey instruments --- p.177 / Chapter 4.5.4 --- Development of the Multi-level School Self Management Scales --- p.179 / Chapter 4.5.5 --- "Survey instruments for measuring school, group and individual levels performance" --- p.195 / Chapter 4.5.6 --- Treatment of data --- p.200 / Chapter 4.5.7 --- The need to use multi-level analysis --- p.201 / Chapter 4.5.8 --- The multi-level model --- p.203 / Chapter 4.5.9 --- Limitations and Assumptions of the Quantitative Study --- p.209 / Chapter 4.6 --- Outlier Case Studies --- p.212 / Chapter 4.6.1 --- Identification of outlier cases --- p.212 / Chapter 4.6.2 --- Data collection --- p.219 / Chapter 4.6.3 --- Analysis of data --- p.221 / Chapter Chapter Five --- Results and Discussion: Self Management and Performancein School / Chapter 5.1 --- Introduction --- p.223 / Chapter 5.2 --- Demographic Characteristics of Multi-level Samples --- p.224 / Chapter 5.2.1 --- Demographic characteristics of school samples --- p.224 / Chapter 5.2.2 --- Demographic characteristics of group and teacher samples --- p.228 / Chapter 5.3 --- Descriptive Statistics of Variables and Scales --- p.232 / Chapter 5.4 --- Preliminary Analysis --- p.236 / Chapter 5.4.1 --- Relationship between multi-level self management strengths --- p.236 / Chapter 5.4.2 --- "Relationship between school, group and individual levels performance" --- p.239 / Chapter 5.5 --- School Level Performance and Multi-level Self Management Strength --- p.245 / Chapter 5.5.1 --- School level performance and school self management strength --- p.245 / Chapter 5.5.2 --- School level performance and group/individual self management strengths --- p.250 / Chapter 5.5.3 --- Summary --- p.252 / Chapter 5.6 --- Group Level Performance and Multi-level Self Management Strengths --- p.253 / Chapter 5.6.1 --- General observations --- p.253 / Chapter 5.6.2 --- Multi-level analysis of group level performance --- p.257 / Chapter 5.6.3 --- Interaction analysis of group level performance --- p.267 / Chapter 5.6.4 --- Summary --- p.272 / Chapter 5.7 --- Individual Level Performance and Multi-level Self Management Strengths --- p.273 / Chapter 5.7.1 --- General observations --- p.273 / Chapter 5.7.2 --- Multi-level analysis of individual level performance --- p.276 / Chapter 5.7.3 --- Summary_ --- p.289 / Chapter 5.8 --- Congruence of Multi-level Self Management Practices and Multi-level Performance in School --- p.290 / Chapter 5.9 --- An Overview of Findings 、 --- p.295 / Chapter Chapter Six --- Results and Discussion: The Nature of Multi-level Self Management Cycles / Chapter 6.1 --- Introduction --- p.298 / Chapter 6.2 --- Characteristics of Outlier Case Study Schools --- p.298 / Chapter 6.2.1 --- Demographic Characteristics --- p.299 / Chapter 6.2.2 --- Self Management Strength Profiles of Case Study Schools --- p.304 / Chapter 6.2.3 --- General Observations of Self Management Practices --- p.308 / Chapter 6.3 --- Sequential Nature of Multi-level Management Cycles --- p.320 / Chapter 6.3.1 --- Sequential Nature of Self Management Cycle at the School Level --- p.320 / Chapter 6.3.2 --- Sequential Nature of Self Management Cycle at the Group Level --- p.327 / Chapter 6.3.3 --- Sequential Nature of Self Management Cycle at the Individual Level --- p.332 / Chapter 6.3.4 --- Summary --- p.339 / Chapter 6.4 --- Learning in Multi-level Self Management Cycles --- p.340 / Chapter 6.4.1 --- Learning in major cycles --- p.340 / Chapter 6.4.2 --- Learning in support cycles --- p.357 / Chapter 6.4.3 --- Summary --- p.372 / Chapter 6.5 --- Mutual Influences of Self Management Practice across Levels --- p.374 / Chapter 6.5.1 --- Evidence identified in the LLL School --- p.374 / Chapter 6.5.2 --- Evidence identified in the LHH School --- p.379 / Chapter 6.5.3 --- Evidence identified in the HHH School --- p.387 / Chapter 6.5.4 --- Summary --- p.395 / Chapter 6.6 --- An Overview of Findings --- p.397 / Chapter Chapter Seven --- Conclusion and Implications / Chapter 7.1 --- Conclusion --- p.399 / Chapter 7.2 --- Implications --- p.405 / Chapter 7.2.1 --- Implications for research and theory development --- p.406 / Chapter 7.2.2 --- Implications for practices --- p.412 / Chapter 7.3 --- Final Remarks --- p.421 / References --- p.422 / Appendices --- p.452 / Appendix A - School Response Rate in Main Study Survey / Appendix B - Table Showing Distribution of Groups in the Study / Appendix C - Questionnaires / Appendix D - Stage 1 Factor Analysis Results / Appendix E - Stage 2 Factor Analysis Results / Appendix F - Table Showing the Aggregated Self Management Strengths of Sample Schools / Appendix G - Table Showing the Self Management Strength and Performance Indicator Profile of Case Study Schools
8

The Incidence of th Drop Outs at the Lakeland, Florida, High School, and Suggestions for Alleviation of the Problem.

Tyndalll, Lauredits B. Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
9

Single-function government, multi-function government and the market for elementary and secondary education /

Testa, William Anthony. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 1981. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 122-126). Available online via OhioLINK's ETD Center.
10

Bemagtiging van ouers en opvoeders in selfbesturende skole in Suid-Afrika

Du Toit, Retha Martjie. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M. Ed.)--University of Pretoria, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references.

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