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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A retrospective look at the perceived effects of parental acceptance/non-acceptance on transgender adolescents a project based upon an independent investigation /

Ryan, Tara. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.W.)--Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Mass., 2009. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 49-50).
2

Student affairs professionals' knowledge and perceptions of transgender issues in higher education /

Rossett, Alexandra Tye, January 2009 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.) -- Central Connecticut State University, 2009. / Thesis advisor: Jane Fried. "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Counseling." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 26-28). Also available via the World Wide Web.
3

Medienwelten - Zeitschrift für Medienpädagogik

Vollbrecht, Ralf, Dallmann, Christine 24 July 2017 (has links)
No description available.
4

Explicit Legal Protections for Transgendered Canadians: Why it is Necessary and How it Might be Done

Tam, Michael Wun Ho 28 November 2013 (has links)
Explicit legal protections for trans individuals are necessary in Canadian human rights and antidiscrimination jurisprudence. The current grounds of protection against discrimination that trans individuals must rely upon (i.e., sexual orientation discrimination, disability discrimination and sex discrimination) insufficiently recognize trans individuals and the trans discrimination they face. I propose that a multi-level framework of explicit legal protections is required to address these insufficiencies. This framework includes the recognition of an analogous ground of Gender Identity and Gender Expression under the Charter, amendments to human rights legislation incorporating trans protections into prohibited grounds of discrimination at federal and provincial levels, and finally explicit recognition of trans individuals and trans discrimination in legal arguments and in litigation. This framework will allow for mutual reinforcement at multiple levels and promote development of trans specific jurisprudence. With such explicit legal protections in place trans individuals will be better protected against trans discrimination in Canada.
5

Explicit Legal Protections for Transgendered Canadians: Why it is Necessary and How it Might be Done

Tam, Michael Wun Ho 28 November 2013 (has links)
Explicit legal protections for trans individuals are necessary in Canadian human rights and antidiscrimination jurisprudence. The current grounds of protection against discrimination that trans individuals must rely upon (i.e., sexual orientation discrimination, disability discrimination and sex discrimination) insufficiently recognize trans individuals and the trans discrimination they face. I propose that a multi-level framework of explicit legal protections is required to address these insufficiencies. This framework includes the recognition of an analogous ground of Gender Identity and Gender Expression under the Charter, amendments to human rights legislation incorporating trans protections into prohibited grounds of discrimination at federal and provincial levels, and finally explicit recognition of trans individuals and trans discrimination in legal arguments and in litigation. This framework will allow for mutual reinforcement at multiple levels and promote development of trans specific jurisprudence. With such explicit legal protections in place trans individuals will be better protected against trans discrimination in Canada.
6

Therapy for the male-to-female transgender client : a clinician's guide

Haun, Lindsey Lee 03 October 2014 (has links)
Male-to-female transgender clients seek therapy to learn to safely modify their voices in order to sound more feminine. Unfortunately, to this author’s knowledge, there are no data that report the number of transgender individuals who are actively seeking speech therapy, nor any accurate estimate of the number of transgender individuals in the United States. Moreover, current resources for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) lack up-to-date, comprehensive information about assessing and treating transgender clients. The present handbook will provide the most recent research related to appropriate therapeutic guidelines and activities to SLPs and SLP graduate students. In specific, the handbook will include research and techniques for modifying pitch, resonance, intonation, semantics, and nonverbal communication for transgender women. Moreover, the handbook will include background information about the current issues transgender women face in society and in seeking medical treatment. / text
7

The male-to-female transgender voice client of the 21st century

Bodoin, Erika Melissa. 29 October 2010 (has links)
The purpose of the present study was to determine the current characteristics and needs of the male-to-female transgender voice client. Specifically, what are the current characteristics (e.g. age, marital status, number of children) of the male-to-female transgender client? Does participation in therapy affect overall satisfaction with feminine presentation? Do alternative methods for voice feminization (e.g. DVDs, YouTube, peer mentors) result in similar levels of satisfaction? Lastly, do male-to-female transgender avoid community activities in order to prevent being perceived as male, and can therapy help with this? We evaluated the responses of 77 participants who completed an Internet-based survey. Results were compared to Blanchard’s 1994 study of characteristics of male-to-female transgender persons. Characteristics of the 1994 study and the MtF transgender client of 2010 were comparable, with a slightly older age for the present study. The client was likely to have been married at least once, and to have at least one child. Respondents who had participated in speech therapy were more satisfied with their femininity overall when compared to those who had not received speech services. Satisfaction with alternative methods was low. In addition, both groups reported a high level of avoidant activities based on fear of being perceived as male. / text
8

Transgender identities : within and beyond the constraints of heteronormativity

Fee, Angie January 2010 (has links)
This thesis explores how transgender identities are constructed and discursively produced in the socio-historical context of the early twenty-first century. In so doing, it addresses the relationship between experience and discourse. I examine the ways in which identities are embodied and articulated through an analysis of interviews with self-identified transgendered people. Chapter one outlines the key aims of this thesis, including situating myself as a researcher and how I came to be doing this. Chapter two explores the historical and cultural conditions within which sexed and gendered identities are constructed. Theoretical debates have mainly taken place on the essentialist/constructionist continuum which can usefully be understood as connoting a space between fixed identities and fluid social processes. Much has been written on what sex and gender are, and are not, and most of this work underplays the importance of the heterosexual matrix as the source of sex and gender categorisation. Chapter three describes how the phenomenological approach meets the challenges of engaging with the complexities of sexed and gendered identities in that it focuses on the lived experiences and voices of the eleven participants recruited for the study. I use a narrative approach which illustrates how stories are embedded in social and cultural discourses through which sexed and gendered identities are constructed. Chapter four outlines the personal dissonance experienced by transgendered people when their sexed and gendered identities are not congruent with the binary categories of the western heterosexual matrix. The participants’ stories illustrate that gender is something that is an internal phenomenological “felt” experience in their lives and incongruent with the external identity that society has assigned them. Chapter five illustrates how stories are grounded in cultural and historical discourses. In particular, the participants demonstrate how self esteem and mental health are central to their developing identities and how important it is for them to be in contact with a larger collective identity category. Chapter six and seven explore the two mutually reinforcing processes involved in transitioning — passing and self-identification. Chapter six explores the processes of emotional and physical changes entailed by the various choices transgendered people make about their self-identity and the ensuing action required. Chapter seven examines the process of self-identification, illustrating the hegemonic power of heteronormativity and its understanding of identity and desire. Chapter eight discusses the research findings in relation to heteronormativity. It shows how peoples’ understandings of their sexed and gendered identities challenge hegemonic binaries and their fixed assumptions about sexed, gendered and sexual identities. The participants’ stories show the tension between the limitations of categories that have been available for transgendered people and the lived experience of transgendered subjectivity within which the historical legacy of particular hegemonic categories remain potent. I argue that it is not enough to research into sexed and gendered identities without critically questioning the dominant influence of hegemonic heterosexuality in producing normative accounts of sex, gender and sexuality. The chapter concludes by pointing to how the category of “transgender” has the potential to expose and begin to move beyond the limited conceptual space of heterosexual discourse which depends on binary sexed and gender categories for exploring and understanding erotic relationships. The conclusions drawn from this research propose a commitment to engaging with queer theory as a way of blurring and expanding the definitions of sexed and gendered identities that are regulated by the heterosexual matrix.
9

Transsexuals and the law

Whittle, Stephen Thomas January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
10

The Queer carnival : gender transgressive images in contemporary Queer performance and their relationship to carnival and the Grotesque

Bayley, Bruce Howard January 2000 (has links)
No description available.

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