• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 213
  • 64
  • 41
  • 35
  • 12
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • Tagged with
  • 610
  • 246
  • 241
  • 217
  • 211
  • 210
  • 137
  • 116
  • 108
  • 79
  • 75
  • 71
  • 69
  • 63
  • 59
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Transforming bodies and The making of a hybrid male /

Dénommé-Welch, Spy. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--York University, 2006. Graduate Programme in Interdisciplinary Studies. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 55-60). Also available on the Internet. MODE OF ACCESS via web browser by entering the following URL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:MR19661
22

Medienwelten - Zeitschrift für Medienpädagogik

Vollbrecht, Ralf, Dallmann, Christine 24 July 2017 (has links)
No description available.
23

Transgender : a study of quality of life

Seidl, Helma. January 2008 (has links)
This research presents a new way to improve inclusiveness for the variety of transgender self-identities in clinical settings. The spectrum of transgender identities were clustered into two groups: the fixed -- representing transgender individuals who preferred identification with the gender binary male or female, and the fluid -- representing transgender individuals that favor openness and flexibility on the gender continuum. Furthermore, different scales, the Memorial University of Newfoundland's Scale of Happiness (MUNSH) (Kozma, & Stones, 1980) and Bradley's Well-Being Scale (BWB) (Bradley, 1994), Self-Confidence Scale (Oakley, 1996, 1998) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) (Cohen, 1994) were investigated for their reliability with transgender clients. The fixed and fluid transgender groups were then used as the key criterion for investigating differences in quality of life (QOL), self-confidence, stress and counselling satisfaction. Using combined quantitative as well as qualitative methodology, data was analyzed for a sample of 145 transgender people. Mean age was 42.27. Quality of life for the fluid transgender group was <extremely low,> the group difference was not significant Stress was expectedly very high in both groups, but interestingly self-confidence was also high. The mean difference between the fixed (M=17.44) and fluid (M=20.82) transgender groups was statistically significant. One in four transgender individuals identified either as <neutral> or <dissatisfied to very dissatisfied> with their counselling experience. The dissatisfaction was higher in the fluid transgender group. One hundred eleven transgender participants (111) completed seven open-ended questions and 11 participated in a semi-structured, face-to-face interview process, guided by thirteen questions. The stories of the participants demonstrated how a gender specific upbringing affects transgender individuals through: themes of shame, guilt, and anger. While, transgender individuals developed survival techniques such as daydreaming and fantasizing, negative coping methods such as alcohol abuse, drug abuse and self-harm were also common. Family was identified as the dominant factor in reinforcing gender appropriate behaviour. To improve clinical care these findings should be taken into consideration.
24

Understanding gender variation : a visual perspective

Gammon, Patrice M. January 2008 (has links)
This project is an attempt to present a visual representation of gender variation. Not everyone identifies as either "male" or "female." Likewise not everyone's gender corresponds to their biological sex. Gender variation is a difficult concept to both understand and explain, in part because our vocabulary only offers the binary opposites "male" and "female". Words used to describe someone outside this gender dichotomy are confusing, used inconsistently or derogatory in nature. The project proposes that gender is a continuum and offers a possible visual representation. My hope is that this effort will enable us to better conceptualize the in-between experience as a precursor to developing more meaningful language around this topic. The written document includes a review of literature, an explanation of methods used to create the project, discussion of the results, and a final overview. The actual creative project itself is a short video found on the accompanying DVD. / Department of Telecommunications
25

Stories of women who support trans men: An autoethnographic voyage

Merryfeather, Lyn 23 June 2014 (has links)
“The only true voyage…would be not to visit strange lands but to possess other eyes, to see the universe through the eyes of another, of a hundred others, to behold the hundred universes that each of them sees, that each of them is…” (Proust, 2003, p. 343). This wonderful quote from Proust seems like a fitting place to begin because I wish to take you on an autoethnographic journey of discovery so that you can see for yourself what it was like for the participants and me as we found ourselves in strange and sometimes frightening territory. We realized that we were, sometimes unexpectedly, in positions of support to our friends or lovers who were uncomfortable with the sex they were assigned at birth. Most of us would describe ourselves as lesbian and, when our partners began to explore the possibility of sex reassignment, struggled with our established identity. My friend Christopher was the inspiration for this exploration. We were domestic partners before and during his early transition from female to male. Both Christopher and I were public figures in the small town in which we lived and our lives were somewhat on display. Christopher founded an organization called Trans Connect to provide support to those who present their gender in alternate ways and to provide education to service providers as well as to schools with regard to transgender issues and is well known in that town as well as in the larger gender diverse community as a trans man. Because of this, he has agreed to waive anonymity. The body of this work includes the entire texts of three papers I have written during the course of my studies as I navigated the path to this research. All of these papers have been published in peer-reviewed journals. I have used these papers to illustrate my autoethnographic journey toward the discovery of diverse gender presentations, to describe the state of knowledge in the discipline of nursing regarding this issue, and to demonstrate how autoethnography works. The centre of the work is the novel I have written based upon the stories the participants and I have shared with one another. The novel is written in everyday language and aims to show, rather than tell, the stories of ten women who love and support trans men. In many parts of the dissertation I have used dialogue, both internal as well as conversation among created characters, as a way to bring to life concepts under discussion. This is in keeping with an autoethnographic style. The dissertation is organized into three parts. Part one is a description of the process and methods I undertook in order to arrive at the novel. It consists of eight chapters that are placed in a more or less linear way, although the process was not at all linear, from the beginning of my exploration, to a discussion of the overall voyage. Part two consists of the novel, which is the story of experiences of women living with trans men during their transition or consideration of transition, disguised as having been experienced by fictional characters. Part three contains four chapters that are the analysis, a description of how I managed the information gathered, a discussion of evaluation for such a work as this, and some consideration as to the distribution and future for the study. My research questions were: • What is it like to be in loving relationship with an FTM during and after some of his transition? • What are the effects on the relationship for the female partner during this time? • What happens to the supportive partner’s ideas of her own identity? • Does the balance of power shift during this transition, and if so, how? The novel poignantly addresses all these questions. To be in a loving relationship with a trans man in the early stages of transition can be very challenging, and for the participants and me, often ended in a breakdown of the relationship. It can be a difficult time for women supporters because their adjustments and struggles with identity and sense of self and community are frequently overshadowed by the enormity, and for some, curiosity of sex reassignment. Often the relationship shifts from egalitarian to one that resembles more of a male-female binary where the male exerts power over his partner. Half of the participants in this study said they would not enter into another relationship with a trans man. That leaves the other half who said they would. The novel might serve as a help to those considering such a relationship as well as to those already walking the sometimes slippery, sometimes exhilarating road of partnership with a trans man. There are no easy answers to these questions. My aim is to reveal a glimpse into the lives of people about whom not much is known. / Graduate / 2015-06-05 / 0569 / merryfeather@shaw.ca
26

Solidarity in the Borderlands of Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality: Racialized Transgender Men

Gately, Cole 01 January 2011 (has links)
This qualitative study uses multiple autobiographical narratives of racialized transgender men to examine the intersecting axes of oppression at work in the borderlands of identity. The research contributes more complex understandings of transgender lives by raising questions about how gender, race, class, and sexuality intersect in the lives of racialized transgender men, and how such identities negotiate their place in the various communities constituted by those particular social locations. In particular I look at the ways that solidarity works in the borderlands, the liminal space composed of intersecting subject positions. I ask what constitutes solidarity, and I discover the contingencies operating in the borderlands that facilitate or pose barriers to full participation and solidarity of racialized transgender men. Findings reveal the complex negotiations racialized transgender men must engage in, both within and outside of queer and feminist communities, and challenge us to think through the meanings of solidarity.
27

Solidarity in the Borderlands of Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality: Racialized Transgender Men

Gately, Cole 01 January 2011 (has links)
This qualitative study uses multiple autobiographical narratives of racialized transgender men to examine the intersecting axes of oppression at work in the borderlands of identity. The research contributes more complex understandings of transgender lives by raising questions about how gender, race, class, and sexuality intersect in the lives of racialized transgender men, and how such identities negotiate their place in the various communities constituted by those particular social locations. In particular I look at the ways that solidarity works in the borderlands, the liminal space composed of intersecting subject positions. I ask what constitutes solidarity, and I discover the contingencies operating in the borderlands that facilitate or pose barriers to full participation and solidarity of racialized transgender men. Findings reveal the complex negotiations racialized transgender men must engage in, both within and outside of queer and feminist communities, and challenge us to think through the meanings of solidarity.
28

Transprejudice in Hong Kong Chinese attitudes towards transgenderism and transgender civil rights /

King, Mark Edward. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hong Kong, 2008. / Also available in print.
29

Increasing awareness, sensitivity, and availability to LGBTQ resources

Bowen, Angie. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references.
30

Stories of women who support trans men: An autoethnographic voyage

Merryfeather, Lyn 23 June 2014 (has links)
“The only true voyage…would be not to visit strange lands but to possess other eyes, to see the universe through the eyes of another, of a hundred others, to behold the hundred universes that each of them sees, that each of them is…” (Proust, 2003, p. 343). This wonderful quote from Proust seems like a fitting place to begin because I wish to take you on an autoethnographic journey of discovery so that you can see for yourself what it was like for the participants and me as we found ourselves in strange and sometimes frightening territory. We realized that we were, sometimes unexpectedly, in positions of support to our friends or lovers who were uncomfortable with the sex they were assigned at birth. Most of us would describe ourselves as lesbian and, when our partners began to explore the possibility of sex reassignment, struggled with our established identity. My friend Christopher was the inspiration for this exploration. We were domestic partners before and during his early transition from female to male. Both Christopher and I were public figures in the small town in which we lived and our lives were somewhat on display. Christopher founded an organization called Trans Connect to provide support to those who present their gender in alternate ways and to provide education to service providers as well as to schools with regard to transgender issues and is well known in that town as well as in the larger gender diverse community as a trans man. Because of this, he has agreed to waive anonymity. The body of this work includes the entire texts of three papers I have written during the course of my studies as I navigated the path to this research. All of these papers have been published in peer-reviewed journals. I have used these papers to illustrate my autoethnographic journey toward the discovery of diverse gender presentations, to describe the state of knowledge in the discipline of nursing regarding this issue, and to demonstrate how autoethnography works. The centre of the work is the novel I have written based upon the stories the participants and I have shared with one another. The novel is written in everyday language and aims to show, rather than tell, the stories of ten women who love and support trans men. In many parts of the dissertation I have used dialogue, both internal as well as conversation among created characters, as a way to bring to life concepts under discussion. This is in keeping with an autoethnographic style. The dissertation is organized into three parts. Part one is a description of the process and methods I undertook in order to arrive at the novel. It consists of eight chapters that are placed in a more or less linear way, although the process was not at all linear, from the beginning of my exploration, to a discussion of the overall voyage. Part two consists of the novel, which is the story of experiences of women living with trans men during their transition or consideration of transition, disguised as having been experienced by fictional characters. Part three contains four chapters that are the analysis, a description of how I managed the information gathered, a discussion of evaluation for such a work as this, and some consideration as to the distribution and future for the study. My research questions were: • What is it like to be in loving relationship with an FTM during and after some of his transition? • What are the effects on the relationship for the female partner during this time? • What happens to the supportive partner’s ideas of her own identity? • Does the balance of power shift during this transition, and if so, how? The novel poignantly addresses all these questions. To be in a loving relationship with a trans man in the early stages of transition can be very challenging, and for the participants and me, often ended in a breakdown of the relationship. It can be a difficult time for women supporters because their adjustments and struggles with identity and sense of self and community are frequently overshadowed by the enormity, and for some, curiosity of sex reassignment. Often the relationship shifts from egalitarian to one that resembles more of a male-female binary where the male exerts power over his partner. Half of the participants in this study said they would not enter into another relationship with a trans man. That leaves the other half who said they would. The novel might serve as a help to those considering such a relationship as well as to those already walking the sometimes slippery, sometimes exhilarating road of partnership with a trans man. There are no easy answers to these questions. My aim is to reveal a glimpse into the lives of people about whom not much is known. / Graduate / 0569 / merryfeather@shaw.ca

Page generated in 0.0424 seconds