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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Cinderella Experience Exploring the Psychological Consequences of Temporary Aspirational Brand Access

Stevens, Jennifer Lynn 10 August 2018 (has links)
Individuals are motivated to consume brands that allow them to express their self-concept and signal a unique identity to others. However, consumers may not always be able to purchase these brands. Aspirational brands are currently unaffordable “dream brands” that an individual desires to purchase at some point in the future after reaching a higher status or income level. Through aspirational access, an emerging form of access-based consumption, consumers can now temporarily experience their ideal lifestyle for a membership fee. Researchers have begun to explore access-based consumption as an alternative to traditional ownership since consumers are increasingly choosing to access products and benefit from the use, rather than buying and owning them. Most research focuses on utilitarian access-based consumption, such as car sharing. Yet more consumers are using access-based services to facilitate an idealized lifestyle. In the past, these consumers would have to wait to acquire aspirational brands after saving up to purchase, but aspirational access now provides the benefits of these brands in the present allowing aspirational access-based consumers to forego the patience and work of saving long-term for the brand. Four studies are conducted to holistically explore the psychological consequences of aspirational access. Specifically, the following research questions are addressed by employing a multi-method approach in a series of four studies —What do owners of aspirational brands think about aspirational access-based services? How does aspirational access participation influence an accessor’s self- and brand-related perceptions? How can the outcomes of aspirational access be enhanced for accessors through brand curation? Can accessors temporarily using aspirational brands obtain the same level as self- and brand-related outcomes as owners? By exploring these questions, this research aims to understand the nature of aspirational brand consumption and the psychological consequences of accessing versus owning aspirational brands.
2

Accounting for the Social Element in Access-Based Consumption

Koppenhafer, Leslie 17 October 2014 (has links)
This dissertation examines how the inclusion of the social element in access-based consumption can influence affective and behavioral responses. The first essay builds upon the dimensions proposed by Bardhi and Eckhardt, who found that market mediation, anonymity, temporality, consumer involvement, type of accessed object and political consumerism are key dimensions on which to study access-based consumption. A reconceptualization of these dimensions is proposed in the current work to incorporate the social element. Foremost, a separation of renting and sharing based on the presence or absence of economic exchange is proposed. The implications for the remaining dimensions of anonymity, temporality, consumer participation, type of accessed object, political consumerism and governance are then discussed. Finally, key outcome variables of community, cooperation, loneliness and contagion are reviewed. In Essay 2, the guiding theory of social distance is used to empirically test the impact of the social element on evaluations of a rental service on the outcomes of satisfaction, attitude, disgust and community. In the rental context examined, users are interpersonally anonymous indicating that there is no relationship between the current user and other users. In addition, users must engage in extra-role behaviors because no intermediaries are present. In three experiments, it is shown that encounters with other users can lead to increased feelings of disgust and decreased satisfaction and attitude towards the rental service. Having information about other users, provided in the form of avatar images, can enhance feelings of community, as can certain types of communication between users. Given the benefits that emerge from feelings of community, Essay 3 explores factors that can enhance or detract from sense of community. Factors such as apathetic participation and similarity are considered. In addition, positive outcomes that emerge from feelings of community, such as sign-up likelihood and care behaviors, are measured. / 2015-04-17
3

"Sustainability is a nice Bonus" the role of sustainability in carsharing from a consumer perspective

Hartl, Barbara, Sabitzer, Thomas, Hofmann, Eva, Penz, Elfriede January 2018 (has links) (PDF)
Carsharing has been discussed as one of the most prominent examples of the sharing economy. The worldwide growth of services whereby consumers share access to cars rather than owning a car themselves could be a sustainable solution to environmental problems. However, first research indicates that consumers' environmental concerns play a minor role for using a carsharing compared to financial considerations. Moreover, prior research on B2C carsharing services may not be applicable to P2P services. The current research addresses this gap by investigating the role of sustainability in B2C and P2P carsharing from consumers' perspective. By applying quantitative as well as qualitative methods three studies show that consumers' image of carsharing is "greener" than owning a car and that environmental concerns play a role when consumers decide to use P2P service over B2C services. However, interviews with carsharing users indicate that the sustainable impact of carsharing is rather perceived as a positive side effect than a main argument for carsharing. This should be considered by policy makers and marketers when promoting carsharing because of sustainable benefits.
4

”Why don’t you have your own car?” : A master thesis investingating how Access-based consumption creates consumer-brand relationships for car brands.

Garcin, Alexander, Falkenäng, Olle January 2014 (has links)
Ownership-based consumption mode has been perceived as the normative ideal in how consumer-brand relationships are created. Today, Access-based consumption mode allows consumers to access brands among other consumers without needing to sole- or joint own them. Even though its popularity, there is a limited and quite unclear understanding of how Access-based consumption affects the consumer-brand relationship. The purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent an Access-based consumption mode creates a consumer-brand relationship, compared to an Ownership- based consumption mode in the context of car brands. In order to fulfill our purpose, both a quantitative and qualitative research method was conducted on members of carpools representing Access-based consumption mode, and car owners representing Ownership-based consumption. A theoretical framework Brand Relationship Quality, composed of six dimensions was used to understand the consumer-brand relationship. Our research shows consistently that Access-based consumption creates a weaker relationship between consumers and car brands in all dimensions of BRQ-model compared to Ownership-based consumption. One group of dimensions identified to relate to emotional attachment; Intimacy, Brand-Self Connection and Love/Passion, have relatively higher difference between the two consumption modes. Another group of dimensions related to values of functionality and practicality; Commitment, Brand Partner Quality and Interdependence, have less difference.
5

Understanding consumer appropriation in access-based consumption as the creation of meanings : an investigation trough design / Comprendre l’appropriation par le consommateur dans le cadre de la consommation par l’accès comme la création de significations : une investigation au travers du design

Gruen-Martin, Adèle 18 April 2017 (has links)
Cette dissertation a pour but de comprendre l’appropriation par les consommateurs d’objets ou lieux qu’ils partagent. En nous basant sur les théories de l’appropriation, de la consommation par l’accès et du design, nous questionnons la définition, l’émergence et la valeur perçue de l’appropriation en accès. Nous explorons les contextes de l’autopartage et du coworking au travers de quatre articles. Nos résultats mettent l’emphase sur le rôle des objets matériels dans la mise en pratique de l’appropriation par les consommateurs. Nous définissons l’appropriation du consommateur dans le cadre de l’accès comme la création de significations (valeur de signe, valeur de lien, bien-être dans l’usage) grâce à un ensemble routiniers de pratiques entre les consommateurs et les éléments matériels de l’activité de consommation par l’accès. / This dissertation aims to understand consumer appropriation of objects and places shared with others. We draw from theories of appropriation, access-based consumption and design to question the definition, the value and the emergence of consumer appropriation in access. We explore the contexts of car sharing and coworking spaces through four research articles. Our findings highlight the role of material objects in the enactment of consumer appropriation practices. We define consumer appropriation as the creation of meanings (sign value, linking value, wellbeing in use) enacted through a routinized set of practices between the consumer and the material elements of the access-based activity.
6

Social Class and Consumer Choice

Mas, Erick M 08 1900 (has links)
Marketing research is lacking in the study of how SES influences consumption choices beyond access to purely economic resources, which merely represent purchasing power without explaining consumer preference. The first essay of this dissertation addresses this gap by examining an understudied social resource known as cultural capital—internalized knowledge, skills and behaviors reflecting cultural competence—that can influence the types of products consumers choose. The second essay examines low SES politically conservative consumers' desire to use consumption choices as signals to attain more status. Together, this dissertation extends our understanding of how SES influences consumer preferences for hedonic (vs. utilitarian) products, as well as their preference for product acquisition via access-based consumption (vs. ownership). Furthermore, the psychological processes underlying these effects and the conditions and personality differences moderating these effects are uncovered. Managerial and theoretical implications are provided.
7

Furniture rental – the new way to consume furniture? : Attitudes and intentions to choose furniture rental as an alternative consumption model

Buch, Julia, Trenk, Jakob January 2021 (has links)
Background: Fast furniture is a growing trend similar to fast fashion and fast food, implying that manufacturers produce large quantities of inexpensive furniture. At the same time, consumers use the furniture shorter and replace it more frequently. Fast furniture relies on high resource consumption, outsourced production, and furniture design that makes it necessary to replace it more often. This causes a decrease in quality and an increase in produced quantities. Most of the furniture worldwide is landfilled as it is not recyclable due to low-quality materials. One potential solution is implementing Circular Economic practices, including furniture rental as an alternative way of consumption. Consumer acceptance of this model is scarcely researched, but the formation of consumers' attitudes and intentions has been the subject of publications in other consumption contexts. The recent literature is reviewed, and a research framework was built based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and additional intrapersonal barriers and drivers. Purpose: This research aimed to explain the relationship between intrapersonal barriers and drivers with attitude and behavioral intention towards furniture rental. Further, it was aimed to show which furniture categories are most likely to be rented. Method: A quantitative approach deploying a self-administered online survey was chosen. 235 usable responses were gathered, which were analyzed using PLS-SEM to assess the hypothesized relationships. Conclusion: The findings show that the overall attitude towards furniture rental is positive. Trend orientation and perceived risk are the most influential antecedents of attitude and behavioral intention. Supporting the Theory of Reasoned Action, attitude is the strongest predictor of behavioral intention. Perceived sustainability value, perceived economic value, and materialism also significantly influence the intention to rent furniture. Familiarity with the Sharing Economy shows no significant influence. The study contributes to the existing literature on consumer intentions to use alternative consumption. A new research model was developed based on existing theory and literature. Managers can use the findings to alter, adapt, and build their furniture rental service offerings.

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