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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An analysis of the basic needs approach in its application to regional economic development with specific reference to Ciske

Keeton, Gavin Rodney January 1984 (has links)
In Chapter 7, it was argued that improved satisfaction of basic needs could in principle lead to increased labour productivity and, via a comulative process, to increased output and income levels. Higher incomes could in turn mean further improved satisfaction of basic needs, greater labour productivity and even greater output and income levels. Thus the satisfaction of basic needs could be seen as a means towards the end of improved living standards and the reduction of poverty, and hence an instrument of development policy. From the analysis of basic needs in Ciskei, it is apparent that government expenditure has been such that the "core" basic needs have evidently been catered for, at least to some extent, for some time. Yet, there has been nothing like a concerted strategy, and expenditure on basic needs was the result of ad hoc measures, rather than a conscious strategy or development policy as such. Basic needs were therefore seen simply as ends in themselves, rather than as means to the end of self-sustained economic development. In the case of Ciskei, more information about the satisfaction of basic needs, especially health, and water supply and sanitation, is required at the present stage. Such information should not only be seen in quantitative terms (as "inputs"), but also be evaluated qualitatively (as "outputs"). In other words, basic needs should be viewed functionally as thresholds to the goal of self-sustained economic development. This applies particularly to educatfon, where the total supply may be misleading, more significant measures being quality, access and actual consumption. Data for health, and water supply and sanitation, are not readily available, and again should reflect access and usage as well as availability. Nutritional data should not only reveal the extent and nature of poor nutrition (malnutrition) but also its causes, such as, inadequate expenditure on food on account of low income levels, or inappropriate nutritional patterns of consumption. Data on shelter should take into account the appropriateness of standards and types of shelter, rather than simply the number of houses as such. At the same time, the extent to which basic needs are complementary should be investigated; e.g. the effect the improved satisfaction of education would have on shelter, shelter on health, etc. The stronger such complementarities, the lower total government expenditure on basic needs would have to be. Similarly, if expenditure on basic needs is inappropriate or ill-directed, a revision of standards and redirection of resources may be necessary. In the case of Ciskei, it may well be that total expenditure on basic needs may not be inadequate as such at the present stage, but rather that co-ordination of existing expenditure is required to yield a purposive development policy. A powerful case for the suitability of a Basic Needs strategy for Ciskei may be suggested by the intermediate nature of economic development within its borders. To the extent that some basic needs are already satisfied, at least to some degree and some more than others, certain preconditions for economic development can be said to already exist. Yet it cannot be claimed that Ciskei has reached the "take-off" stage into self-sustained economic growth in the Rostovian sense. Nevertheless, a deliberately co-ordinated Basic Needs strategy may well move Ciskei away from the danger of slipping back into the so-called "Low-Level Equilibrium Trap." In other words, a more scientifically designed, co-ordinated and deliberately applied strategy, whereby basic needs become the means towards self-sustained economic growth, should at least be able to establish the "preconditions for take-off" necessary for sustained economic development.
2

Measures to improve household savings in South Africa.

Darley, Warren. January 2011 (has links)
The level of savings in South Africa has been described as dismal and on the verge of becoming an economic crisis. Household savings has declined to a level of dissavingand is therefore in need of rectification. Savings can be broken down into household, corporate and government saving. The purpose of this research is to identify measures to improve household savings in South Africa. A critical review of household savings is conducted in chapter two utilising secondary data to examine household savings, identify factors affecting savings as well as establish measures to improve household savings. The study gathers primary data from 10leading economists and financial experts located in South Africa.A qualitative study is undertaken as it helps provide intrinsic information on the thoughts and opinions of the sample group on measures to improve household savings. The research has revealed that South African households are not saving sufficiently and that there are a few key factors affecting households savings. The key factors are indentified and investigated in the literature review and further examined by the respondents for their expert opinions. The respondents have identified thathousehold savings behaviours are insufficiently contributing to savings and there is a lack of a savings culture to encourage positive savings growth. Consumers are caught up in a web of consumerism with easy access to credit as a result of financial liberalisation. These two factors have created a debt trend and left many households in a downward spiral of debt. The respondents have identified the main factors affecting households as: savings culture,financial literacy, consumerism, income levels, education and interest rates. Measures identified to improve household savings are: Tax breaks, government incentives to saving, education, budgeting as well as developing a national culture of saving. These suggestions help outline a path for government, corporations and individuals to follow in achieving greater household savings. The research has outlined measures to improve household savings and stressed that there is no one single measure to rectify the savings dilemma, but rather it is to identify and acknowledge that the savings solution lies in addressing each of the factors affecting saving with a view to improving saving as a whole. / Thesis (MBA)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2011.
3

Secondary school science pupils' rankings of science and technology related global problems : a comparison of the responses of rural-Northern Sotho, urban-Xhosa and urban-English speaking pupils in South Africa to meeting basic needs in the context of the 1994 Government White Paper on Reconstruction and Development

Le Grange, Lesley Lionel Leonard January 1995 (has links)
Bibliography: pages 66-71. / In 1984 Bybee used 262 science educators from 41 countries to develop an instrument for measuring their ranked priorities of science and technology related global problems. In 1995 the original Bybee scale was updated and clarified, and a new 15-item version, the Le Grange Global Priorities Instrument (LGPI) was piloted, refined and administered in fifteen schools to 946 secondary school pupils speaking three different home languages in two provinces in South Africa. The study is an enlargement of the work of Bybee and Mau (1986); Bybee and 'Najafi (1986); Ndodana, Rochford and Fraser (1994); and Le Grange, Rochford and Sass (1995), and is carried out in the context of the new key programme of Meeting Basic Needs presented in Section 1.4.1 of the Government White Paper on the Reconstruction and Development Programme for the New South Africa which states:- The basic needs of people extend from job creation, land and agrarian reform to housing, water and sanitation, energy supplies, transport, nutrition, health care, the environment, social welfare and security (Government Gazette No. 16085, 23 November 1994:9). The 946 pupils surveyed in this study in 1995 comprised 414 rural-Northern Sotho pupils (sample 1) from the Northern Province; 189 urban-Xhosa speaking pupils (sample 2) and 343 urban-English speaking pupils (sample 3) from the Western Cape.
4

Impact of Food Security Projects on Poverty Alleviation in Limpopo Province, South Africa

Nesengani, Thinandavha Johannes 11 1900 (has links)
PhDRDV / Institute for Rural Development / See the attached abstract below
5

Feminization of poverty within rural households of Thulamela Municipality in South Africa

Ngonyama, Matimba George 05 1900 (has links)
PhDRDV / Institute for Rural Development / See the attached abstract below
6

An assessment of the sustainability of poverty eradication projects in rural communities of Capricorn District Municipality: Limpopo Province, in South Africa

Masipa, Makgoshi Priscilla 07 September 2010 (has links)
PhDRDV / Institute for Rural Development / See the attached abstract below
7

Socio-economic assessment of starter packs in poverty alleviation at Makhado Local Municipality

Maluleke, Magezi Daniel 08 1900 (has links)
MSCAGR / Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness / See the attached abstract below
8

A reconceptualisation of the concept of social capital: a study of resources for need satisfaction amongst agricultural producers in Vhembe, Limpopo

Vermaak, Nicolaas Jakobus 28 February 2006 (has links)
Social capital, in broad terms, refers to norms, networks, trust and forms of social connections in societies that allows people to gain access to resources. This study involves a reconceptualisation of the concept of social capital. An overview of social capital literature reveals that economic needs are still dominant in both the theory and practice of development efforts that make use of social capital. It would therefore appear that the social capital paradigm is not balanced in that it does not clearly provide for the satisfaction of the diverse range of needs that people, particularly those in the rural communities, often experience. A resource-orientated approach is suggested in broadening the concept social capital to include the satisfaction of a wider variety of needs. An effort is made in the literature study, to capture the manifestations of social capital in different societies globally, with particular emphasis on community life in developing communities of the world. In addition, the discussion of social capital is deepened to include need satisfaction. A matrix of needs, as proposed by Max-Neef (1991), is used to argue that social capital would better be seen as a synergetic resource for the satisfaction of various needs. Instead of understanding social capital as a need, single satisfier, or as a `factor of production', an argument is put forward that such a conception of social capital is incomplete and inaccurate and that, instead, social capital should be understood as a multi-dimensional resource that can be used to service various needs of communities. Extensive fieldwork amongst agricultural producers in the Vhembe district of Limpopo provided ample evidence of social capital, although a precise fit with the mainstream theoretical perspectives was not found. The unusual profile of social capital reaffirmed the argument that social capital is present in different forms in rural developing communities and that social capital can best be seen as multi-dimensional because it has the ability to satisfy a wide variety of needs at different levels. Better use can be made of the concept of social capital by viewing it as multi-dimensional and linked to resources relevant to a wide variety of needs. Further research is needed if social capital is to be used by development planners. / Sosiale kapitaal verwys breedweg na norme, netwerke, vertroue en verskillende vorme van sosiale skakeling. `n Oorsig oor sosiale literatuur toon dat ekonomiese behoeftes die sosiale kapitaal teorie en praktyk domineer, veral tydens ontwilkkelingspogings wat gebruik maak van sosiale kapitaal. Hierdie studie behels `n heroorweging van die konsep sosiale kapitaal. Die sosialekapitaal - paradigma blyk ongeballanseerd te wees aangesien dit nie volkome voorsiening maak vir die verskeidenheid van behoeftes wat mense in landelike gemeenskappe dikwels ondervind nie. Deur die sosiale kapitaal konsep te verbreed, naamlik volgens die bevrediging van `n verskeidenheid van behoeftes, word `n hulpbrongebasseerde benadering tot sosiale kapitaal voorgestel. Tydens die literatuurstudie is gepoog om die manifestasies van sosiale kapitaal in verskillende samelewings van die wêreld vas te lê, met besondere verwysing na ontwikkelende gemeenskappe van die wêreld. Daarbenewens word die bespreking oor sosiale kapitaal spesifiek gekoppel aan behoeftebevrediging. `n Behoefte matriks, soos voorgestel deur Max-Neef (1991), is gebruik om te betoog dat sosiale kapitaal eerder as `n medewerkende hulpbron gesien behoord te word vir die bevrediging van verskillende behoeftes. Volgens hierdie siening word sosiale kapitaal nie beperk tot die bevrediging van enkele ekonomiese behoeftes nie. Hoewel uitgebreide veldwerk genoegsame bewyse van sosiale kapitaal opgelewer het, kon `n presiese ooreenstemming met die hoofstroom sosiaal teoretiese perspektiewe nie gevind word nie. Die ongewone profiel van sosiale kapitaal het die argument bevestig dat sosiale kapitaal as `n multidimensionele hulpbron verstaan behoord te word. Dit het die vermoë om `n wye verskydenheid behoeftes op verskillende vlakke te bevredig. Die konsep sosiale kapitaal kan beter gebruik word mits dit as multidimensioneel gesien word, asook gekoppel word aan hulpbronne wat relevant is aan `n wye verskeidenheid behoeftes. Verdere navorsing is nodig vir sosiale kapitaal om deur ontwikkelingsbeplanners gebruik te word. / Summary in Afrikaans and English / Development Studies / D. Litt. et Phil. (Development Studies)
9

Diens as kommunikasievoertuig van die evangelie in 'n post-apartheid samelewing

Kruger, Johannes Stephanus 06 1900 (has links)
Text in Afrikaans / Apartheid is verby. Die nuwe Suid-Afrika het gekom. Maar met die koms van die nuwe Suid-Afrika het die oue nie verdwyn nie. Die oue van die apartheidsverlede is nog met ons. Ons is die erfgename van apartheid en dra die letsels van apartheid nog saam met ons. Armoede, werkloosheid, behuisingsnood en geweld en misdaad is deel van die post-apartheid samelewing en kan nie weggewens word nie. Die kerk is geroep om die evangelie in die samelewing aan alle mense te kommunikeer. In hierdie kommunikasie moet die evangelie in 'n post-apartheid samelewing gesien en ervaar kan word in dade van diens. Daarom staan dade van diens in hierdie studie sentraal. Hierdie studie handel dus oor die diens van gelowiges wat 'n kommunikasievoertuig is van die evangelie in 'n post-apartheid samelewing. Vanuit die nood en behoeftes van mense in die post-apartheid samelewing is twee dade van diens geidentifiseer wat sentraal staan in die kommunikasie van die evangelie. Dit is bemagtiging en versoening. Omdat 'n groot dee! van die samelewing in die verlede geen mag op ekonomiese en politieke terreine gehad het nie, is dade van diens wat mense bemagtig noodsaaklik. In hierdie bemagtiging speel ekonomiese-, sosiale- en psigologiese bemagtiging 'n groot rol. En omdat mense deur die verlede van apartheid op grond van velkleur van mekaar geskei en geisoleer is, vra dit dat mense met mekaar versoen word. In die proses om versoening tussen mense te bewerkstellig speel verantwoordelikheid, erkenning van apartheidskuld, restitusie, regstellende aksie, die luister na mense se stories en vergifnis 'n baie belangrike rol. Vanuit 'n geloofsperspektief is die <liens van die gelowige in 'n post-apartheid samelewing in verband gebring met Jesus Christus se di ens wat Hy as voorbeeld voorgehou het vir al sy navolgers. Omdat gelowiges navolgers is van Christus is alle gelowiges die subjekte van diens aan mense in die samelewing. Vir hierdie diens in die samelewing word die gelowige in die geloofsgemeenskap (of gemeente) deur gemeenskap (koinonia) opgebou en deur die geestelike leiers toegerus om diensbaar aan mense in die samelewing te wees. / Apartheid is a thing of the past. The new South Africa has dawned. But that does not mean that the "old" South Africa has disappeared. The "old" South Africa is still present. We are the inheritors of apartheid and have to live with the scars of apartheid. Poverty, joblessness, a shortage of housing and violence and crime are an integral part of the post-apartheid society and cannot be wished away. The church is called upon to communicate the gospel to all people in society. In a post-apartheid society it is important that in this process of communication, the gospel is seen and experienced in deeds of service. Deeds of service are thus central in this study. This study entails service of believers as communication vehicles of the gospel in a post-apartheid society. Derived from the needs of people in the post-apartheid society two deeds of service are identified which are essential in the communication of the gospel. These are empowerment and reconciliation. A large part of the society previously had no power on the economical and political fronts - therefore deeds of service that cultivate empowerment are essential. In this process economic, social and psychological empowerment plays an important role. And because people were separated and isolated on the ground of skin colour, people need to be reconciliated. In the process of establishing reconciliation among people, it has to be recognised that responsibility, confession of guilt, restitution, affirmative action, listening to people's stories and forgiveness have an important role. From a Christian perspective the service of the believer in a post-apartheid society is orientated to the service of Jesus Christ. His service serves as an example to all his followers. Because believers are followers of Christ, they are all his instruments of service. For this service believers are edified in their local churches by community (koinonia) and equipped by the spiritual leaders to be of service to people in the society. / Philosophy, Practical & Systematic Theology / D. Th. (Praktiese Teologie)
10

A reconceptualisation of the concept of social capital: a study of resources for need satisfaction amongst agricultural producers in Vhembe, Limpopo

Vermaak, Nicolaas Jakobus 28 February 2006 (has links)
Social capital, in broad terms, refers to norms, networks, trust and forms of social connections in societies that allows people to gain access to resources. This study involves a reconceptualisation of the concept of social capital. An overview of social capital literature reveals that economic needs are still dominant in both the theory and practice of development efforts that make use of social capital. It would therefore appear that the social capital paradigm is not balanced in that it does not clearly provide for the satisfaction of the diverse range of needs that people, particularly those in the rural communities, often experience. A resource-orientated approach is suggested in broadening the concept social capital to include the satisfaction of a wider variety of needs. An effort is made in the literature study, to capture the manifestations of social capital in different societies globally, with particular emphasis on community life in developing communities of the world. In addition, the discussion of social capital is deepened to include need satisfaction. A matrix of needs, as proposed by Max-Neef (1991), is used to argue that social capital would better be seen as a synergetic resource for the satisfaction of various needs. Instead of understanding social capital as a need, single satisfier, or as a `factor of production', an argument is put forward that such a conception of social capital is incomplete and inaccurate and that, instead, social capital should be understood as a multi-dimensional resource that can be used to service various needs of communities. Extensive fieldwork amongst agricultural producers in the Vhembe district of Limpopo provided ample evidence of social capital, although a precise fit with the mainstream theoretical perspectives was not found. The unusual profile of social capital reaffirmed the argument that social capital is present in different forms in rural developing communities and that social capital can best be seen as multi-dimensional because it has the ability to satisfy a wide variety of needs at different levels. Better use can be made of the concept of social capital by viewing it as multi-dimensional and linked to resources relevant to a wide variety of needs. Further research is needed if social capital is to be used by development planners. / Sosiale kapitaal verwys breedweg na norme, netwerke, vertroue en verskillende vorme van sosiale skakeling. `n Oorsig oor sosiale literatuur toon dat ekonomiese behoeftes die sosiale kapitaal teorie en praktyk domineer, veral tydens ontwilkkelingspogings wat gebruik maak van sosiale kapitaal. Hierdie studie behels `n heroorweging van die konsep sosiale kapitaal. Die sosialekapitaal - paradigma blyk ongeballanseerd te wees aangesien dit nie volkome voorsiening maak vir die verskeidenheid van behoeftes wat mense in landelike gemeenskappe dikwels ondervind nie. Deur die sosiale kapitaal konsep te verbreed, naamlik volgens die bevrediging van `n verskeidenheid van behoeftes, word `n hulpbrongebasseerde benadering tot sosiale kapitaal voorgestel. Tydens die literatuurstudie is gepoog om die manifestasies van sosiale kapitaal in verskillende samelewings van die wêreld vas te lê, met besondere verwysing na ontwikkelende gemeenskappe van die wêreld. Daarbenewens word die bespreking oor sosiale kapitaal spesifiek gekoppel aan behoeftebevrediging. `n Behoefte matriks, soos voorgestel deur Max-Neef (1991), is gebruik om te betoog dat sosiale kapitaal eerder as `n medewerkende hulpbron gesien behoord te word vir die bevrediging van verskillende behoeftes. Volgens hierdie siening word sosiale kapitaal nie beperk tot die bevrediging van enkele ekonomiese behoeftes nie. Hoewel uitgebreide veldwerk genoegsame bewyse van sosiale kapitaal opgelewer het, kon `n presiese ooreenstemming met die hoofstroom sosiaal teoretiese perspektiewe nie gevind word nie. Die ongewone profiel van sosiale kapitaal het die argument bevestig dat sosiale kapitaal as `n multidimensionele hulpbron verstaan behoord te word. Dit het die vermoë om `n wye verskydenheid behoeftes op verskillende vlakke te bevredig. Die konsep sosiale kapitaal kan beter gebruik word mits dit as multidimensioneel gesien word, asook gekoppel word aan hulpbronne wat relevant is aan `n wye verskeidenheid behoeftes. Verdere navorsing is nodig vir sosiale kapitaal om deur ontwikkelingsbeplanners gebruik te word. / Summary in Afrikaans and English / Development Studies / D. Litt. et Phil. (Development Studies)

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