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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

Factors which influence employee participation in training and development : a study of clerical staff at McGill University

Dressler, Jacqueline Faith January 1994 (has links)
This study examines the participation of clerical staff in training and development. It also considers the potential benefits of participation and the influence of forces in the work environment on participation. A survey of the population of 937 clerical staff at McGill University yielded a response of 460. Three-quarters of staff indicated awareness of training and development opportunities, with approximately half of these having participated in 1993/1994. Staff consider performance enhancement as by far the most likely benefit of participation. They are also inclined to agree that their supervisors are supportive of training and development, while they tend to be unsure whether they have their co-workers' support. Further, staff tend to be unsure or to disagree that situational constraints influence participation. Significant interactions between several of the variables were found. This study discusses the implications of these findings for McGill and makes recommendations for further research.
32

Towards better recognition of women's skills :

Barker, Joanne Susan Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MEd (Human Resource Studies)) -- University of South Australia, 1995
33

Towards better recognition of women's skills :

Barker, Joanne Susan Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MEd (Human Resource Studies)) -- University of South Australia, 1995
34

Die neue arbeitsrechtliche Gesetzgebung in ihrer Bedeutung für den Handlungsgehilfen /

Frantzen, Walter. January 1929 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Universität Erlangen.
35

Bedienden georganiseerd ontstaan en ontwikkeling van de vakbeweging van handels- en kantoorbedienden in Nederland van het eerste begin tot in de Tweede Wereldoorlog /

Reinalda, Bob. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Groningen, 1981. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 535-542) and index.
36

Bedienden georganiseerd ontstaan en ontwikkeling van de vakbeweging van handels- en kantoorbedienden in Nederland van het eerste begin tot in de Tweede Wereldoorlog /

Reinalda, Bob. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Groningen, 1981. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 535-542) and index.
37

Bargaining strategies of white-collar workers in British Columbia

Marchak, Maureen Patricia January 1970 (has links)
The primary objective of this thesis is to examine the relationship between job control — that is, the amount of discretion a worker exercises at his job — and bargaining strategies. The relationship between income and bargaining strategies is also examined, and the joint effects of income and job control are analysed. In addition, attention is given to the association between social interaction rates among workers with job control levels held constant, and bargaining strategies. The main argument associates job control with replaceability and with marketability of skills; these with bargaining strategies; and, consequently, job control with bargaining strategies. Hypotheses are stated which link low job control to the low incidence of individual bargaining, low income, willingness to join unions, and union membership. An argument then links low job control to passive behavior, and consequently to low individual bargaining, and low rates of participation in union activities. Survey research, involving interviews with white-collar workers in 43 commercial firms in British Columbia, was undertaken to test the arguments. Tests consisted of percentage comparisons between workers with differing levels of job control, with respect to specific questions and responses. Data was examined separately for men and women. Support was found for the predicted associations between job control and individual bargaining, and job control and Income. For women, but not for men, support was found for the predicted associations between job control and willingness to join unions, and job control and union membership. For men, but not for women, limited support was found for the predicted relationship between job control and participation rates in union activities. An analysis of the relationship between income and strategies revealed that low incomes are associated with willingness to join unions. When job control levels are held constant, income continues to be inversely associated with pro-union responses. Similarly, when income levels are held constant, an inverse relationship is maintained between job control and pro-union responses. High income tends to decrease the effects of low control, and high control tends to decrease the effects of low income. The two variables also interact, such that a combination of low control and low income is strongly associated with pro-union responses. It is suggested that the evidence justifies further examination of relationships between job control and bargaining strategies, but that this examination should take into consideration more detailed information regarding specific populations engaged in given skill areas, and the employment opportunities available to them. An additional argument associates low interaction rates of workers and management personnel with pro-union responses and union membership, and high interaction rates of workers and co-workers with pro-union responses and membership. The argument is stated with respect to the opportunity workers have for engaging in discussion of bargaining positions, defining the employer as an opponent, and organizing collective energies. This section of the theory was generally unsubstantiated. It is suggested that white-collar workers have higher interaction rates than manual workers, and differences in rates do not have a substantial influence on organization potential. / Arts, Faculty of / Sociology, Department of / Graduate
38

Die saalklerk as hulppersoneellid in 'n akademiese hospitaalverpleegeenheid

Van der Merwe, Thelma Dolores 10 June 2014 (has links)
M.Cur. (Professional Nursing) / The shortage of professional nurses necessitates the optimal utilisation of the professional nurses and auxiliary staff available to unit managers in academic nursing units. The optimal utilisation of human resources, funds, stock and methods constitutes effective management. The unit manager is responsible for the achievement of objectives means of effective management enabling the optimal utilisation and productive functioning of her staff in the provision of quality nursing. Retaining auxiliary staff is often as difficult as retraining nurses and they will not be attracted to hospital work if there is no clear occupational structure. This study questions the expectations (knowledge and insight) of uni t managers as well as ward clerks regarding the duties and responsibilities of the ward clerk in an academic hospital nursing unit in Johannesburg. The value of a structured educational programme for ward clerks in order to improve their capabilities profile (knowledge and insight) was also examined. The objectives with this study were: to determine the expectations (insight and knowledge) of unit managers as well as ward clerks regarding the duties and responsibilities of the ward clerk (in an academic hospital nursing unit): to design, implement and evaluate an educational programme for ward clerks: and to determine the effect of that programme on the capabilities profile (knowledge and insight) of the ward clerk.
39

Gender, class and culture : women secretarial and clerical workers in the United States, 1925-1955 /

Anderson, Mary Christine January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
40

Factors which influence employee participation in training and development : a study of clerical staff at McGill University

Dressler, Jacqueline Faith January 1994 (has links)
No description available.

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