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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Retail Salesclerks: Their Work Environment and Self-Concept

Surprenant, Peter L. 01 January 1977 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
42

A study of the motivation of clerical officers in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Cheung, Yuen-mui, Jeice., 張元妹. January 1995 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Public Administration / Master / Master of Public Administration
43

A study of the motivation of clerical officers in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University /

Cheung, Yuen-mui, Jeice. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.P.A.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves lii-lv).
44

A study of the motivation of clerical officers in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Cheung, Yuen-mui, Jeice. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.P.A.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leave lii-lv). Also available in print.
45

Development and Evaluation of a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale as a Measure of Secretarial and Clerical Performance

O'Connor, Suzan 08 1900 (has links)
Empirical findings on Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) have been mixed, despite early researchers' claims that BARS were superior to trait ratings and in reliability and resistance to leniency, central tendency, and halo. The study presented compared a BARS format to an independently derived trait scale as measures of secretarial and clerical performance. Though the BARS showed slightly inflated mean ratings, the instruments showed nearly identical variability. Neither demonstrated sufficient resistance to halo. Thus, despite their intuitive appeal and the rigors involved in format development, it did not appear in this instance that BARS were an efficient and psychometrically superior alternative to the traditional trait rating format.
46

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PERFORMANCE OF AN INTERVENTION STRATEGY AND THE ANXIETY LEVEL SCORES OF WOMEN OFFICE WORKERS.

Gonzá lez, María del Carmen. January 1982 (has links)
No description available.
47

The growth of non-manual workers' unions in manufacturing industries in Great Britain since 1948

Bain, George Sayers January 1968 (has links)
This study attempts to discover the major factors which promote or hinder the growth of trade unionism among white-collar workers, particularly those employed in manufacturing Industries, in Great Britain. Chapter I simply discusses the reasons for undertaking such a study, a few of the methodological and conceptual problems which arise, as well as the nature of the techniques and the analytical framework used in the study. Chapter II is concerned with the pattern of white-collar employment in Britain and reveals how the composition of the labour force is changing. Already almost four out of ten workers are white-collar employees, and it is probable that by the 1980's they will outnumber the manual workers. Clearly, if the trade union movement is to continue as a dynamic and effective force in British society, it must recruit these white-collar workers. The extent to which the trade union movement has already done this is considered in Chapter III. In particular, it assembles the data on the dependent variable of this study - the occupational and industrial pattern of white-collar unionism in Britain. The pattern reveals that there are considerable variations in the degree of white-collar unionism from one industry and occupation to another. All the remaining chapters analyse the factors which this study considers worthy of examination in searching for an explanation of this pattern. Chapter IV considers the socio-demographie characteristics of white-collar workers. Chapter V examines the white-collar workers' economic position, while Chapter VI analyses their work situation. The role which trade unions and employers play in union growth is explored in Chapters VII and VIII respectively, while the influence of the government and the social climate is investigated in-Chapter IX, Chapter X draws the various parts of the analysis together and tries to produce a few generalisations regarding the growth of white-collar unionism. The gist of these chapters can be briefly summarised. No significant relationship was found between the aggregate pattern of white-collar unionism and any of the following factors: (a) such socio-demographic characteristics of white-collar workers as their sex, social origins, age, and status; (to) such aspects of their economic position as earnings, other terms and conditions of employment, and employment security; (e) such aspects of their work situation as the opportunities for promotion, the extent of mechanisation and automation, and the degree of proximity to unionised manual workers; and (d) such aspects of trade unions as their public image, recruitment policies, and structures. While the evidence regarding some of these factors was not sufficiently reliable to permit them to be discounted completely, it was satisfactory enough to reveal that at most they have been of negligible importance. But the gist of these chapters is not entirely negative. The aggregate pattern of white-collar unionism was found to be significantly related to the following factors: employment concentration, union recognition, and government action. The relationship between these key independent variables and between them and the dependent variable can be usefully summarised in a two-equation descriptive model. D = f (C,E) (1) R = g (D,G) (2) where D = the density of white-collar unionism; C = the degree of employment concentration; R = the degree to which employers are prepared to recognise unions representing white-collar employees; and G = the extent of government action which promotes union recognition. The first equation specifies that the density of white-collar unionism is a function of the degree of employment concentration and the degree to which employers are prepared to recognise unions representing white-collar employees. The more concentrated their employment the more likely employees are to feel the need to join trade unions because of "bureaucratisation", and the more easily trade unions can meet this need because of the economies of scale characteristic of union recruitment and administration While employment concentration is a necessary condition for the growth of white-collar unions, it is not a sufficient condition. Employers must also be prepared to recognise these unions. The greater the degree to which employers are prepared to do this the more likely white-collar employees are to join unions. For they are less likely to Jeopardise their career prospects by joining, they can more easily reconcile union membership with their "loyalty" to the company, and they will obtain a better service because their unions will be more effective in the process of job regulation. The first independent variable makes white-collar employees predisposed towards trade unions, while the second makes union membership practical and attractive. But the degree to which employers are prepared to recognise unions representing white-collar employees is to some extent dependent upon the membership density of these unions. This is why the second equation is necessary. It specifies that the degree of recognition is a function of the density of white-collar unionism and the extent of government action which promotes union recognition. Employers generally do not concede recognition to a union before it has at least some membership. The only exception to this is when employers recognise a union prior to it having obtained any membership in order to encourage its growth at the expense of other "less desirable" unions. Even in these cases, recognition is at least partly a function of membership density - that of the "less desirable" unions* But while a certain density of membership is a necessary condition for any degree of recognition to be granted, the findings of this study suggest that it is generally not a sufficient condition. The industrial strength of white-collar unions, as determined by the size of their membership and their willingness and ability to engage in industrial warfare, has generally not been sufficient in itself to force employers to concede recognition. This has also required the introduction of government policies which have made it easier for unions to exert pressure for recognition and harder for employers to resist it. The model is claimed to give an adequate explanation of the growth of aggregate white-collar unionism in Britain, and, in addition, to have some important implications for research on this subject as well as for the function of unions in modern industrial society, and the future growth of white-collar unionism.
48

A System of Selection and Human Resource Development for Small Retailers of Apparel and Accessories

Burr, Patricia LeMay 05 1900 (has links)
The study has a twofold purpose. The first is to determine the extent to which organized selection and training practices exist in small apparel and accessory retailing establishments, and the general attitude which small retailers of apparel and accessories express toward the value of selection and training functions. The second is to construct a practical system which can be used in small apparel and accessory retailing establishments.
49

Subjectivity in the Performance Appraisal System of a Data Processing Company

Bierstedt, Sheryl Ann 08 1900 (has links)
An attempt was made to determine the presence of subjectivity in the appraisal system of a data processing company. Ninety-one clerks were given individual performance ratings by their supervisors, including an overall rating and ratings on seven performance dimensions. A multiple regression performed on these data resulted in a set of empirical weights. Supervisors were also asked to rank the relative importance of each of the seven dimensions to the clerk job. The mean rankings were regarded as apparent weights. A comparison of the empirical and apparent weights led to the conclusion that supervisors were not rating their employees according to what they said was important for successful performance, thus introducing an element of subjectivity into the system.
50

Vývoj právní úpravy státních civilních úředníků od 18. století do roku 1938 v českých zemích / The development of legal regulation of state civil servants in the Czech Lands from 18th century to 1938

Šouša, Jiří January 2012 (has links)
The present dissertation endeavours to outline and analyze the evolution of the legal regulation of the status of civil servants from the end of the 18th century to 1938, with an emphasis on the understanding of the advent and change of the status of the so-called statutory civil servants in the Czech Lands. It examines certain issues in the history of the Service Law and their points of departure, and defines the terms 'civil servants', 'civil service, and 'bureaucracy', and their tasks, including state and public service. It puts forward a more comprehensive view of the history of this legal theme. Legal regulation of the status of civil servants in the Czech Lands has a long- established tradition which evolves in line with the evolution of the entire legal system and adopts to changes in society, economy, and the individual normative systems, including the law. The origins of the modern form of the Service Law go back to the 18th century, to the Age of Enlightenment, the reign of Marie Theresa and in particular, the reign of Josef II. Some institutes continued to an extent in the regulation of the absolutistic feudalism and that of the estates, while others represented completely new institutes and have been preserved to this day. There was a common principle that applied until the end of the...

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