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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Developing Modeling and Simulation Methodology for Virtual Prototype Power Supply System

Li, Qiong 30 April 1999 (has links)
This dissertation develops a modeling and simulation methodology for design, verification, and testing (DVT) power supply system using a virtual prototype. The virtual prototype is implemented before the hardware prototyping to detect most of the design errors and circuit deficiencies that occur in the later stage of a standard hardware design verification and testing procedure. The design iterations and product cost are reduced significantly by using this approach. The proposed modeling and simulation methodology consists of four major parts: system partitioning, multi-level modeling of device/function block, hierarchical test sequence, and multi-level simulation. By applying the proposed methodology, the designer can use the virtual prototype effectively by keeping a short simulation CPU time as well as catching most of the design problems. The proposed virtual prototype DVT procedure is demonstrated by simulating a 5 V power supply system with a main power supply, a bias power supply, and other protection, monitoring circuitry. The total CPU time is about 8 hours for 780 tests that include the basic function test, steady stage analysis, small-signal stability analysis, large-signal transient analysis, subsystem interaction test, and system interaction test. By comparing the simulation results with the measurements, it shows that the virtual prototype can represent the important behavior of the power supply system accurately. Since the proposed virtual prototype DVT procedure verifies the circuit design with different types of the tests over different line and load conditions, many circuit problems that are not obvious in the original circuit design can be detected by the simulation. The developed virtual prototype DVT procedure is not only capable of detecting most of the design errors, but also plays an important role in design modifications. This dissertation also demonstrates how to analyze the anomalies of the forward converter with active-clamp reset circuit extensively and facilitate the design and improve the circuit performances by utilizing the virtual prototype. With the help of the virtual prototype, it is the first time that the designer is able to analyze the dynamic behavior of the active-clamp forward converter during large-signal transient and optimize the design correspondingly. / Ph. D.
2

Bluenose II: Towards Faster Design and Verification of Pipelined Circuits

Chan, Ca Bol 08 1900 (has links)
The huge demand for electronic devices has driven semiconductor companies to create better products in terms of area, speed, power etc. and to deliver them to market faster. Delay to market can result in lost opportunities. The length of the design cycle directly affects the time to market. However, inadequate time for design and verification can cause bugs that will cause further delays to market and correcting the error after manufacturing is very expensive. A bug in an ASIC found after fabrication requires respinning the mask at a cost of several million dollars. Even as the pressure to reduce the length of the design cycles grows, the size and complexity of digital hardware circuits have increased, which puts even greater pressure on design and verification productivity. Pipelining is one optimization technique which has contributed to the increased complexity in hardware design. Pipeline increases throughput by overlapping the execution of instructions. It is a challenge to design and verify pipelines because the specification is written to describe how instructions are executed in sequence while there can be multiple instructions being executed in a pipeline at one time. The overlapping of instructions adds further complexity to the hardware in the form of hazards which arise from resource conflicts, data dependencies or speculation of parcels due to branch instructions. To address these issues, we present PipeNet, a metamodel for describing hardware design at a higher level of abstraction and Bluenose II, a graphical tool for manipulating a PipeNet model. PipeNet is based on a pipeline model in a formal pipeline verification framework. The pipeline model contains arbiters, flow-control state machines, datapath and data-routing. The designer describes the pipeline design using PipeNet. Based on the PipeNet model, Bluenose II generates synthesizable VHDL code and a HOL verification script. Bluenose II's ability to generate HOL scripts turns the HOL theorem prover into Bluenose II's external verification environment. A direct connection to HOL is implemented in the form of a console to display results from HOL directly in Bluenose II. The data structures that represent PipeNet are evaluated for their extensibility to accommodate future changes. Finally, a case study based on an implementation of a two-wide superscalar 32-bit RISC integer pipeline is conducted to examine the quality of the generated codes and the entire design process in Bluenose II. The generation of VHDL code is improved over that provided in Bluenose I, Bluenose II's predecessor.
3

Bluenose II: Towards Faster Design and Verification of Pipelined Circuits

Chan, Ca Bol 08 1900 (has links)
The huge demand for electronic devices has driven semiconductor companies to create better products in terms of area, speed, power etc. and to deliver them to market faster. Delay to market can result in lost opportunities. The length of the design cycle directly affects the time to market. However, inadequate time for design and verification can cause bugs that will cause further delays to market and correcting the error after manufacturing is very expensive. A bug in an ASIC found after fabrication requires respinning the mask at a cost of several million dollars. Even as the pressure to reduce the length of the design cycles grows, the size and complexity of digital hardware circuits have increased, which puts even greater pressure on design and verification productivity. Pipelining is one optimization technique which has contributed to the increased complexity in hardware design. Pipeline increases throughput by overlapping the execution of instructions. It is a challenge to design and verify pipelines because the specification is written to describe how instructions are executed in sequence while there can be multiple instructions being executed in a pipeline at one time. The overlapping of instructions adds further complexity to the hardware in the form of hazards which arise from resource conflicts, data dependencies or speculation of parcels due to branch instructions. To address these issues, we present PipeNet, a metamodel for describing hardware design at a higher level of abstraction and Bluenose II, a graphical tool for manipulating a PipeNet model. PipeNet is based on a pipeline model in a formal pipeline verification framework. The pipeline model contains arbiters, flow-control state machines, datapath and data-routing. The designer describes the pipeline design using PipeNet. Based on the PipeNet model, Bluenose II generates synthesizable VHDL code and a HOL verification script. Bluenose II's ability to generate HOL scripts turns the HOL theorem prover into Bluenose II's external verification environment. A direct connection to HOL is implemented in the form of a console to display results from HOL directly in Bluenose II. The data structures that represent PipeNet are evaluated for their extensibility to accommodate future changes. Finally, a case study based on an implementation of a two-wide superscalar 32-bit RISC integer pipeline is conducted to examine the quality of the generated codes and the entire design process in Bluenose II. The generation of VHDL code is improved over that provided in Bluenose I, Bluenose II's predecessor.
4

Software Engineering Process Improvement

Sezer, Bulent 01 April 2007 (has links) (PDF)
This thesis presents a software engineering process improvement study. The literature on software process improvement is reviewed. Then the current design verification process at one of the Software Engineering Departments of the X Company, Ankara, T&uuml / rkiye (SED) is analyzed. Static software development process metrics have been calculated for the SED based on a recently proposed approach. Some improvement suggestions have been made based on the metric values calculated according to the proposals of that study. Besides, the author&#039 / s improvement suggestions have been discussed with the senior staff at the department and then final version of the improvements has been gathered. Then, a discussion has been made comparing these two approaches. Finally, a new software design verification process model has been proposed. Some of the suggestions have already been applied and preliminary results have been obtained.
5

Design Validation of RTL Circuits using Binary Particle Swarm Optimization and Symbolic Execution

Puri, Prateek 05 August 2015 (has links)
Over the last two decades, chip design has been conducted at the register transfer (RT) Level using Hardware Descriptive Languages (HDL), such as VHDL and Verilog. The modeling at the behavioral level not only allows for better representation and understanding of the design, but also allows for encapsulation of the sub-modules as well, thus increasing productivity. Despite these benefits, validating a RTL design is not necessarily easier. Today, design validation is considered one of the most time and resource consuming aspects of hardware design. The high costs associated with late detection of bugs can be enormous. Together with stringent time to market factors, the need to guarantee the correct functionality of the design is more critical than ever. The work done in this thesis tackles the problem of RTL design validation and presents new frameworks for functional test generation. We use branch coverage as our metric to evaluate the quality of the generated test stimuli. The initial effort for test generation utilized simulation based techniques because of their scalability with design size and ease of use. However, simulation based methods work on input spaces rather than the DUT's state space and often fail to traverse very narrow search paths in large input spaces. To encounter this problem and enhance the ability of test generation framework, in the following work in this thesis, certain design semantics are statically extracted and recurrence relationships between different variables are mined. Information such as relations among variables and loops can be extremely valuable from test generation point of view. The simulation based method is hybridized with Z3 based symbolic backward execution engine with feedback among different stages. The hybridized method performs loop abstraction and is able to traverse narrow design paths without performing costly circuit analysis or explicit loop unrolling. Also structural and functional unreachable branches are identified during the process of test generation. Experimental results show that the proposed techniques are able to achieve high branch coverage on several ITC'99 benchmark circuits and their modified variants, with significant speed up and reduction in the sequence length. / Master of Science
6

Search State Extensibility based Learning Framework for Model Checking and Test Generation

Chandrasekar, Maheshwar 20 September 2010 (has links)
The increasing design complexity and shrinking feature size of hardware designs have created resource intensive design verification and manufacturing test phases in the product life-cycle of a digital system. On the contrary, time-to-market constraints require faster verification and test phases; otherwise it may result in a buggy design or a defective product. This trend in the semiconductor industry has considerably increased the complexity and importance of Design Verification, Manufacturing Test and Silicon Diagnosis phases of a digital system production life-cycle. In this dissertation, we present a generalized learning framework, which can be customized to the common solving technique for problems in these three phases. During Design Verification, the conformance of the final design to its specifications is verified. Simulation-based and Formal verification are the two widely known techniques for design verification. Although the former technique can increase confidence in the design, only the latter can ensure the correctness of a design with respect to a given specification. Originally, Design Verification techniques were based on Binary Decision Diagram (BDD) but now such techniques are based on branch-and-bound procedures to avoid space explosion. However, branch-and-bound procedures may explode in time; thus efficient heuristics and intelligent learning techniques are essential. In this dissertation, we propose a novel extensibility relation between search states and a learning framework that aids in identifying non-trivial redundant search states during the branch-and-bound search procedure. Further, we also propose a probability based heuristic to guide our learning technique. First, we utilize this framework in a branch-and-bound based preimage computation engine. Next, we show that it can be used to perform an upper-approximation based state space traversal, which is essential to handle industrial-scale hardware designs. Finally, we propose a simple but elegant image extraction technique that utilizes our learning framework to compute over-approximate image space. This image computation is later leveraged to create an abstraction-refinement based model checking framework. During Manufacturing Test, test patterns are applied to the fabricated system, in a test environment, to check for the existence of fabrication defects. Such patterns are usually generated by Automatic Test Pattern Generation (ATPG) techniques, which assume certain fault types to model arbitrary defects. The size of fault list and test set has a major impact on the economics of manufacturing test. Towards this end, we propose a fault col lapsing approach to compact the size of target fault list for ATPG techniques. Further, from the very beginning, ATPG techniques were based on branch-and-bound procedures that model the problem in a Boolean domain. However, ATPG is a problem in the multi-valued domain; thus we propose a multi-valued ATPG framework to utilize this underlying nature. We also employ our learning technique for branch-and-bound procedures in this multi-valued framework. To improve the yield for high-volume manufacturing, silicon diagnosis identifies a set of candidate defect locations in a faulty chip. Subsequently physical failure analysis - an extremely time consuming step - utilizes these candidates as an aid to locate the defects. To reduce the number of candidates returned to the physical failure analysis step, efficient diagnostic patterns are essential. Towards this objective, we propose an incremental framework that utilizes our learning technique for a branch-and-bound procedure. Further, it learns from the ATPG phase where detection-patterns are generated and utilizes this information during diagnostic-pattern generation. Finally, we present a probability based heuristic for X-filling of detection-patterns with the objective of enhancing the diagnostic resolution of such patterns. We unify these techniques into a framework for test pattern generation with good detection and diagnostic ability. Overall, we propose a learning framework that can speed up design verification, test and diagnosis steps in the life cycle of a hardware system. / Ph. D.
7

Automatizace procesu projektování a programování stroje / Automation the process of designing and programming of machine

Boček, Jaromír January 2017 (has links)
This diploma thesis deals with the issue of information transfer between the Department of Electrical Equipment Design and the Software Development Department of the control system of this machine. The diploma thesis focuses mainly on the elimination of the influence of the human factor while increasing the efficiency of this information transfer. System analysis examines the issues and investigates the reliability of information transfer. On the basis of the requirements resulting from the analysis, preventive measures and modifications of procedures in both departments have been proposed. Simultaneously, its own software applications have been developed to considerably simplify and accelerate the process, while meeting the requirements to eliminate problematic phenomena caused particularly by human factors. The resulting solution is verified according to the designated verification process and reassessed by own "SampleVUT" test project. Validation evaluates the effectiveness of the proposed solution.
8

Computer-Aided Fixture Design Verification

Kang, Yuezhuang 08 January 2002 (has links)
This study presents Computer-Aided Fixture Design Verification (CAFDV) - the methods and implementations to define, measure and optimize the quality of fixture designs. CAFDV verifies a fixture for its locating performance, machining surface accuracy, stability, and surface accessibility. CAFDV also optimizes a fixture for its locator layout design, initial clamping forces, and tolerance specification. The demand for CAFDV came from both fixture design engineers and today's supply chain managers. They need such a tool to inform them the quality of a fixture design, and to find potential problems before it is actually manufactured. For supply chain managers, they will also be able to quantitatively measure and control the product quality from vendors, with even little fixture design knowledge. CAFDV uses two models - one geometric and one kinetic - to represent, verify and optimize fixture designs. The geometric model uses the Jacobian Matrix to establish the relationship between workpiece-fixture displacements, and the kinetic model uses the Fixture Stiffness Matrix to link external forces with fixture deformation and workpiece displacement. Computer software for CAFDV has also been developed and integrated with CAD package I-DEAS TM. CAD integration and a friendly graphic user interface allows the user to have easy interactions with 3D models and visual feedback from analysis results.
9

A Systematic Approach To Synthesis Of Verification Test-Suites For Modular SoC Designs

Surendran, Sudhakar 11 1900 (has links)
SoCs (System on Chips) are complex designs with heterogeneous modules (CPU, memory, etc.) integrated in them. Verification is one of the important stages in designing an SoC. Verification is the process of checking if the transformation from architectural specification to design implementation is correct. Verification involves creating the following components: (i) a testplan that identifies the conditions to be verified, (ii) a testcase that generates the stimuli to verify the conditions identified, and (iii) a test-bench that applies the stimuli and monitors the output from the design. Verification consumes upto 70% of the total design time. This is largely due to the complex and manual nature of the verification task. To reduce the time spent in verifying the design, the components used for verification can be generated automatically or created at an abstract level (to reduce the complexity) and reused. In this work we present a methodology to synthesize testcases from reusable code segments and abstract specifications. Our methodology consists of the following major steps: (i) identifying the structure of testcases, (ii) identifying code segments of testcases that can be reused from one SoC to another, (iii) identifying properties of an SoC and its modules that can be used to synthesize the SoC specific code segments of the testcase, and (iv) proposing a synthesizer that uses the code segments, the properties and the abstract specification to synthesize testcases. We discuss two specific classes of testcases. These are testcases for verifying the memory modules and the testcases for verifying the data transfer modules. These are considered since they form a significantly large subset of the device functionality. We implement a prototype testcase generator and also present an example to illustrate the use of methodology for each of these classes. The use of our methodology enables (i) the creation of testcases automatically that are correct by construction and (ii) reuse of the testcase code segments from one SoC to another. Some of the properties (of the modules and the SoC) presented in our work can be easily made part of the architectural specification, and hence, can further reduce the effort needed to create them.
10

Formal Verification Of Analog And Mixed Signal Designs Using Simulation Traces

Lata, Kusum 01 1900 (has links) (PDF)
The conventional approach to validate the analog and mixed signal designs utilizes extensive SPICE-level simulations. The main challenge in this approach is to know when all important corner cases have been simulated. An alternate approach is to use the formal verification techniques. Formal verification techniques have gained wide spread popularity in the digital design domain; but in case of analog and mixed signal designs, a large number of test scenarios need to be designed to generate sufficient simulation traces to test out all the specified system behaviours. Analog and mixed signal designs can be formally modeled as hybrid systems and therefore techniques used for formal analysis and verification of hybrid systems can be applied to the analog and mixed signal designs. Generally, formal verification tools for hybrid systems work at the abstract level where we model the systems in terms of differential equations or algebraic equations. However the analog and mixed signal system designers are very comfortable in designing the circuits at the transistor level. To bridge the gap between abstraction level verification and the designs validation which has been implemented at the transistor level, the very important issue we need to address is: Can we formally verify the circuits at the transistor level itself? For this we have proposed a framework for doing the formal verification of analog and mixed signal designs using SPICE simulation traces in one of the hybrid systems formal verification tools (i.e. Checkmate from CMU). An extension to a formal verification approach of hybrid systems is proposed to verify analog and mixed signal (AMS) designs. AMS designs can be formally modeled as hybrid systems and therefore lend themselves to the formal analysis and verification techniques applied to hybrid systems. The proposed approach employs simulation traces obtained from an actual design implementation of AMS circuit blocks (for example, in the form of SPICE netlists) to carry out formal analysis and verification. This enables the same platform used for formally validating an abstract model of an AMS design to be also used for validating its different refinements and design implementation, thereby providing a simple route to formal verification at different levels of implementation. Our approach has been illustrated through the case studies using simulation traces form the different frameworks i.e. Simulink/Stateflow framework and the SPICE simulation traces. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach around the Checkmate and the case studies for hybrid systems and the analog and mixed signal designs.

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