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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Teacher education in Transkei : a critical and comparative study of the evolution of selected aspects of its administrative, curricular and course structures as an indicator of future policy and planning in the provision of teachers.

Ngubentombi, Sidwell Vusumzi Sinda. January 1984 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1984. / In any consideration of teacher education reforms, priority should be given to an examination of the formative forces and determinant factors which have combined to influence and shape the existing structure of the teacher education system of the country concerned. This study spans the development of teacher education in Transkei from the early days of simple tribal community education through the era of missionary endeavour and the colonial peried to the application of the Nationalist Government's policy of separate development to education in the country. The main thrust of the investigation, however, is concerned with the achievement of independent internal administration and the granting of sovereign independence in 1976 and their effects upon teacher education. Considerable attention is devoted to the period of independence and the respective roles of the University of Transkei and the Government Department of Education in the development of a new approach to teacher education in the Republic of Transkei. Teacher education in the post-independence era is not properly planned, is fragmented and split into a bewildering number of agencies. Problems of co-ordination between the University of Transkei and the Colleges for the education of teachers and between the University and the Government Department of Education, point to an urgent need for an effective instrument of College-University affiliation which will replace the existing Affiliated College Board and make possible the establishment of cordial wholesome interpersonal and institutional relationships. Acomparative study of models of affiliation which have been tried in some selected countries of the world is provided in order to suggest possible alternatives. The role of the University in teacher education is examined in some considerable detail and central to this is the analysis of the concepts of 'Africanisation' and 'pragmatisation'. The study of the curricula and courses offered by the University of Transkei reveals that their current proliferation is not the answer. It is instead the improvement, modification, careful implementation and consolidation of existing programmes which are required. Other issues which arise in this connection are the overloading and improper weighting of courses, lack of organic unity amongst them and sound co-ordination in their design and implementation, readiness to accept and adopt without modification every innovation in the RepUblic of South Africa and the low quality of College lecturers. The final upshot of the study is a recommendation in respect of a National policy for the education of teachers based upon aims and objectives which are clearly outlined. Priorities formulated in a smaller number of general categories are determined and it is recommended that these be adhered to in the strictest style. Effective communication between institutions and organisations concerned with teacher education, involving, in the main, radical changes in the Affiliated College Board structure and recognition of the status of the Colleges, is strongly recommended. To achieve these ends, a firm proposal is made for the creation of: (i) A Teacher Education Division within the Government Department of Education; (ii) A Professional Planning Council representative of all bodies concerned; (iii) An Institute of Education based on the English model to replace the existing Affiliated College Board, and representative of all the institutions concerned. A view is stressed, however, that an approach to the solution of the major teacher education problems identified. will to a great extent depend not only on the institution of the proposed structure. but also on the will cordial wholesome interpersonal and institutional relationships and commitment. It is suggested that this should be implemented without delay.
2

Challenges facing the teaching and learning of accounting in Secondary Schools of the Mthatha Education District

Susani, Mongezi January 2016 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to examine the challenges facing the teaching and learning of Accounting in secondary schools of the Mthatha education district. There are 69 secondary schools that offer Accounting in the Mthatha education district. In order to attain the objectives and fulfil the aim of the study, the researcher used the qualitative research approach, both in collecting and analysing the data. The case study design was used to describe and access the phenomenon of challenges facing the teaching and learning of Accounting in the Mthatha education district. Convenience sampling method was used to select twelve Accounting teachers from six different secondary schools in the Mthatha education district. Face-to-face in-depth interviews and non-participant observation were used to collect the data. Themes were drawn from the responses of the participants and these were analysed. The study revealed the following factors as challenges facing the teaching and learning of Accounting in secondary schools of the Mthatha education district: Teachers had professional qualifications in teaching, but fewer of them had Accounting as subject of their specialisation. Frequency of workshops was identified as a challenge by interviewed teachers. The study revealed that teachers are unfamiliar with the content to teach, and as a result, they are unable to develop the learner guides. The study found that teachers are using insufficient LTSM to teach Accounting. Instructional strategies used by teachers for teaching and learning of Accounting affected the process of teaching and learning of this subject. Redeployment is a challenge that affects the capacity of schools in the teaching and learning of Accounting. The study also revealed that there is a lack of parental involvement and support in the education of their children, which negatively affects the teaching and learning of Accounting. Limited commitment from teachers and learners was also revealed as one of the challenges in teaching and learning Accounting. The researcher made recommendations towards mitigating the effects of the challenges in teaching and learning of Accounting.
3

The influence of initiation schools on adolescent knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and gender related issues in the Maluti Area, Eastern Cape.

Sitole, Nomhle N. January 2008 (has links)
Although many cultures attach great value to young males attending traditional initiation schools, there are a number of questions that remain unanswered. Because of the secrecy that surrounds these schools, there may be many opportunities for addressing vital social issues that may not be made use of or are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role played by the initiation schools in educating the young men about HIV/AIDS and gender related issues in the Maluti area in the Eastern Cape from the leader’s and from the initiates’ perspectives. A comparison with non-initiates was also conducted. The researcher also aimed to explore the programs offered at the initiation schools; whether initiation schools serve as a source of knowledge pertaining to HIV/AIDS and gender related issues to the young men. The researcher conducted interviews with leaders of two different initiation schools, focus group discussions with two groups of young males that had attended two different initiation schools, and also with one group of young males that had not yet attended initiation school in the Maluti area. The study was qualitative and data was analysed using content analysis. The results reflect that both initiated and uninitiated young males had attended same workshops on gender issues offered through their schools, the only difference in knowledge and attitude is therefore based on what the initiated youth learnt from the initiation school. This knowledge reflected an understanding of equity principles in treating women. In addition, the initiated young males reflected some understanding of the equal rights and treatment of women. However there was little difference between the two groups of young males, perhaps because there was apparently not much included at initiation school. Another reason could have been because the initiates did not perceive it as one of the important issues discussed since there was little emphasis coming from the initiation school, the leaders or from the visiting speakers. / Thesis (M.Sc.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2008.
4

Research projects

Adusei-Owusu, James January 2001 (has links)
RESEARCH PROJECTS: 1 RESEARCH PROJECT ONE: A literature review: Constructivism: An alternate approach to teaching and learning. Abstract The constructivist perspectives on learning have helped enhance science educators' understanding of how students make sense of their lived experiences. Constructivism purports to be a transformation of the traditional curriculum. As such this article starts with a brief overview of behaviorism: the scientific approach to education. The main tenets underlying constructivism, how constructivism guides educators to change their classroom practice, and the implications to science teaching have been reviewed. 2 RESEARCH PROJECT TWO (Empirical study): Being Constructive: College students' learning of work and heat as aspects of the energy concept based a constructivist approach. Abstract This study is an extension of a literature review on constructivism as an alternate teaching and learning approach discussed in research project one. It is an empirical study concerning the use of a learning module based on a constructivist approach to develop pre-service student teachers' understanding of work and heat as aspects of the energy concept. The data consisted mainly of transcripts of students' interviews, written responses to questionnaires designed in the form of a worksheet, and comments from non-participant observers and students. The results seem to suggest that a carefully designed learning module based on a constructivist teaching and learning approach may be a valuable tool in developing pre-service student teachers' understanding of work and heat. 3 RESEARCH PROJECT THREE (Empirical study): A College in transition: A case study of the readiness of a college in the Eastern Cape province to implement Outcomes-Based Education in an Education Development centre. Abstract Curriculum 2005 premised on Outcomes-Based Education is the new curriculum framework for South Africa. It signifies a paradigm shift in education from the traditional 'telling-listening' relationship between the teacher and the learner to one that emphasises leamer-centred approach to the teaching process. Teachers, though recognized as crucial to the educational transformation process in the country have also being identified as ill-equipped to meet the challenges posed by Outcomes-Based Education. This study starts with a brief overview of the South African curriculum and the main tenets underlying Outcomes-Based Education. The institutional conditions and whether the lecturers at a college in the Eastern Cape province perceive the need for a change in their classroom practice were also investigated. Bearing in mind the need for further research to validate the findings of this study, positive indicators that emerged from the study suggest the readiness of the college to implement Outcomes-Based Education at the proposed Education Development Centre.
5

Factors that influence environmental teaching : a case study of Ngqeleni District, Eastern Cape.

Gxaba, Nobuntu Judith. January 2005 (has links)
This study investigates factors that influence environmental teaching in rural schools in the Ngqeleni District, Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Focusgroup interviews at selected schools for Grade 4 to 6 teachers were held between 7th and 22nd November 2005. The study shows that the environmental curriculum, teacher qualifications and training, resources, attitudes of teachers and learners, governance and the context, influence the implementation of environmental teaching. The study reflects that teacher qualifications and training are the most limiting factors and need to be addressed immediately because environmental curriculum is not effectively delivered. Recommendations provided entail that teachers need to be included during the curriculum planning process together with curriculum experts from the Department of Education. The Department of Education also needs to effectively plan teacher training and extend the training period for teachers. Intersectoral collaboration within government in terms of how teachers are trained might also be helpful for better environmental teaching. A buddy system in which schools form environmental support groups might be helpful to keep on building local experience and capacity at the local level. Teachers are supposed to be part of the pUblishing process of resource materials to ensure relevance of resource materials to their contexts. A traveling resource centre with DVD's, for example, for shOWing different contexts beyond local level might also be helpful. Further training of teaching staff and the use of study trips for the best classes of pupils might also motivate learners and teachers. / Thesis (M.Sc.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2005.

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