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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Factors relating to exclusion from school : a systematic approach

Rendall, Susan Elizabeth 2001 (has links)
No description available.
2

The search for an excluded minor characterization of ternary Rayleigh matroids

Phillips, Stephanie 2008 (has links)
Rayleigh matroids are a class of matroids with sets of bases that satisfy a strong negative correlation property. Interesting characteristics include the existence of an efficient algorithm for sampling the bases of a Rayleigh matroid [7]. It has been conjectured that the class of Rayleigh matroids satisfies Mason’s conjecture [14]. Though many elementary properties of Rayleigh matroids have been established, it is not known if this class has a finite set of minimal excluded minors. At this time, it seems unlikely that this is the case. It has been shown that there is a single minimal excluded minor for the smaller class of binary Rayleigh matroids [5]. The aim of this thesis is to detail our search for the set of minimal excluded minors for ternary Rayleigh matroids. We have found several minimal excluded minors for the above class of matroids. However, our search is incomplete. It is unclear whether the set of excluded minors for this set of matroids is finite or not, and, if finite, what the complete set of minimal excluded minors is. For our method to answer this question definitively will require a new computer program. This program would automate a step in our process that we have done by hand: writing polynomials in at least ten indeterminates as a sum with many terms, squared.
3

The search for an excluded minor characterization of ternary Rayleigh matroids

Phillips, Stephanie 2008 (has links)
Rayleigh matroids are a class of matroids with sets of bases that satisfy a strong negative correlation property. Interesting characteristics include the existence of an efficient algorithm for sampling the bases of a Rayleigh matroid [7]. It has been conjectured that the class of Rayleigh matroids satisfies Mason’s conjecture [14]. Though many elementary properties of Rayleigh matroids have been established, it is not known if this class has a finite set of minimal excluded minors. At this time, it seems unlikely that this is the case. It has been shown that there is a single minimal excluded minor for the smaller class of binary Rayleigh matroids [5]. The aim of this thesis is to detail our search for the set of minimal excluded minors for ternary Rayleigh matroids. We have found several minimal excluded minors for the above class of matroids. However, our search is incomplete. It is unclear whether the set of excluded minors for this set of matroids is finite or not, and, if finite, what the complete set of minimal excluded minors is. For our method to answer this question definitively will require a new computer program. This program would automate a step in our process that we have done by hand: writing polynomials in at least ten indeterminates as a sum with many terms, squared.
4

Towards principles and practice for participatory development evaluation in the context of community based organisations

Konstant, Tracey Louise 5 April 2011 (has links)
Development asks that the inequity and unsustainability of the widening gap between rich and poor be narrowed, ultimately impacting on households in the most economically excluded communities. Local community-based organisations (CBOs) provide much of the organisational fabric through which development is delivered. Largely resourced by the poorest themselves, many of these CBOs aspire to attracting funds from the development aid industry. In attempting to comply with the rules of these funding sources and compete in funding relationships, organisations become players in the funding game fraught with power imbalance and seemingly contradictory incentives. Neither the funding agencies, intent on disbursement, nor the CBOs in their desire to build organisations and contribute to their communities, seem aware of the true costs of these relationships. Aid funding is complex, operating at numerous levels, across a multiplicity of varied organisations, stakeholders and contexts. Over the last 60 years, the aid industry has evolved complicated and highly engineered mechanisms to manage relationships with funding recipients, including detailed conventions for evaluation. As part of contractual obligation, criteria for success are pre-defined; outcomes are predicted; and targets are projected. Development, however, is not linear or predictable. It is contradictory and complex. Despite objections and alternatives since the late 1980s, ‘conventional’ linear, simplistic rationale has dogged the development industry. The HIV support sector as a focus for funding, capacity building and service contracts from government and international aid agencies, offers rich examples of aid industry dynamics. This research, set amongst small but established CBOs working in HIV/AIDS support in Soweto and Lawley (Gauteng) and Mabeskraal (North West Province), explores alternative evaluation approaches, methodologies and principles, based on grounded evaluation. Two models are tested and compared. Firstly, inward-looking, organisation-based, reflective self-evaluation using Stories and Metaphor. Than secondly, outward-looking, community research using a Most Significant Change approach. The evaluation processes developed help participating CBOs describe success and outcomes against their own criteria. The approaches use narrative, visual and metaphorical formats. The central purpose of the research is meta-evaluation aimed at an effective process using iterative, cumulative action research based on the principles of grounded theory. Meta-evaluation data included descriptions of the processes and the nature of evaluation results. They are analysed using reflection, learning and re-design in an action research cycle. The results provide both practical insights into conducting evaluation, and the principles of effective development in a CBO setting. They demonstrate that grounded evaluation can be used to understand organisational dynamics and programme outcomes. Participatory methods, particularly visual and verbal communication, are shown to be far superior to written communication in this setting. The results demonstrate the mutual compatibility and ethical inseparability of organisation development with evaluation, providing insight into the practice of utilisation-based evaluation. The value of appreciative inquiry and the risks of accusatory inquiry are described. A thread that runs through the results highlights the impact of power, ownership and process use in effective evaluation. The research has also elaborated some of the intractable contradictions and conundrums in development aid. Money carries the power vested in global economics and market forces. In making funding judgements, evaluators purvey the power of wealth inequity: the very power imbalance which itself purports to address. As a development practitioner, an evaluator’s role should be to facilitate pathways out of dependent mindsets. As gatekeepers to financial support, however, their work entrenches distortions in perceptions of wealth and power. These complex interactions of power and ownership demand moderation and compromise. The industry requires investment of greater energy into theoretical, methodological and practical research. Suggestions for such research are included. Without fresh creativity, development and evaluation will remain frustrated forces within an entrenched, self-perpetuating system of inequity and disparity. Thesis (PhD)--University of Pretoria, 2011. Human Resource Management unrestricted
5

Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Folding : - in-vitro equilibrium and kinetic studies on selected model systems

Christiansen, Alexander 2013 (has links)
Protein folding is the process during which an extended and unstructured polypeptide converts to its compact folded structure that is most often the functional state. The process has been characterized extensively in dilute buffer in-vitro during the last decades but the actual biological place for this process is the inside of living cells. The cytoplasm of a cell is filled with a plethora of different macromolecules that together occupy up to 40% of the total volume. This large amount of macromolecules restricts the available space to each individual molecule, which has been termed macromolecular crowding. Macromolecular crowding results in excluded volume effects and also increases chances for non-specific interactions. Macromolecular crowding should favor reactions that lead to a decrease in the total occupied volume by all molecules, such as folding reactions. Theoretical models have predicted that the stability of protein folded states should increase in presence of macromolecular crowding due to unfavorable effects on the extended unfolded state. To understand protein folding and function in living systems, we need to have a defined quantitative link between in-vitro dilute conditions (where most biophysical experiments are made) and in-vivo crowded conditions. An important question is thus how macromolecular crowding modifies the biophysical properties of a protein. The work underlying this thesis focused on how macromolecular crowding tunes protein equilibrium stability and kinetic folding processes. To mimic the crowded cellular environment, synthetic sugar-based polymers (Dextrans of different sizes and Ficoll 70) were used as crowding agents (crowders) in controlled in-vitro experiments. In contrast to previous studies which often have focused on one protein and one crowder at a time, the goal here was to make systematic analyses of how size, shape and concentration of the crowders affect both equilibrium and kinetic properties of structurally-different proteins. Three model proteins (cytochrome c, apoazurin and apoflavodoxin) were investigated under crowding by Ficoll 70 and different-size Dextrans, using various spectroscopic techniques such as far-UV circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Thermodynamic models were applied to explain the experimental results. It was discovered that equilibrium stability of all three proteins increased in presence of crowding agents in a crowder concentration dependent manner. The stabilization effect was around 2-3 kJ/mol, larger for the various Dextrans than for Ficoll 70 at the same g/l, but independent of Dextran size (in the range 20 to 70 kDa). To further investigate the cause for the stabilization a theoretical crowding model was applied. In this model, Dextran and Ficoll were modeled as elongated rods and the protein was represented as a sphere, where the folded sphere representation was smaller than the unfolded sphere representation. It is notable that the observed stability changes could be reproduced by this model taking only steric interactions into account. This correlation showed that when using sugar-based crowding agents, excluded volume effects could be studied in isolation and there were no contributions from nonspecific interactions. Time-resolved experiments with apoazurin and apoflavodoxin revealed an increase in the folding rate constants while the unfolding rates were invariant in the presence of crowding agents. For apoflavodoxin and cytochrome c, the presence of crowding agents also altered the folding pathway such that it became more homogeneous (cytochrome c) and it gave less misfolding (apoflavodoxin). These results showed that macromolecular crowding restricts the conformational space of the unfolded polypeptide chain, makes the conformations more compact which, in turn, eliminates access to certain pathways. The results from kinetic and equilibrium measurements on three model proteins, together with available data from the literature, demonstrate that macromolecular crowding effects due to volume exclusion are in the order of a few kJ/mol. Considering the numerous concentration balances and cross-dependent reactions of the cellular machinery, small changes in energetics/kinetics of the magnitudes found here can still have dramatic consequences for cellular fitness. In fact local and transient changes in macromolecular crowding levels may be a way to tune biochemical reactions without invoking gene expression. 
6

Sociální situace obyvatel sociálně vyloučené lokality v Náchodě Social Situation in Selected Social Precluded Locality of Náchod

BIDLOVÁ, Jana 2011 (has links)
Socially excluded localities are found all over the Czech Republic. They are whole neighbourhoods, houses or streets, usually situated on the outskirts of towns, threatened by a symbolic, territorial, cultural, economic and social exclusion. The inhabitants of the socially excluded localities usually have debts with the town, which is the reason why they were moved to this locality. Problems that frequently occur in the socially excluded localities include insufficient education, high unemployment rate, financial problems and a high occurrence of socially pathological phenomena. Drawing on the facts obtained, it is possible to recommend social services that missing here at present. At the same time, the results of this thesis may serve to social workers as a detailed survey of the social situation of the locality in question.
7

Politics as Endurance: Hannah Arendt and the Three Deaths of Being

Orr, Steven Ray Shadbolt 2014 (has links)
This thesis examines Hannah Arendt's vita activa in the context of the contemporary political world that is marked by the inclusion of a variety of beings beyond mere human plurality. Understanding that Arendt's work is in opposition to the isolating tendencies of philosophical and bureaucratic thought, I look to the processes of labor and work as methods by which togetherness and worldliness can be recovered. Beginning with Richard Sennett's The Craftsman and Vanessa Lemm's Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy, I draw out a common thread in projects that consider non-human actors as capable of politicking: endurance. Building upon Arendt's work in The Human Condition and On Violence, I suggest that the vita diutina, the enduring life, and the three deaths of being serve as a useful ways of understanding already ongoing political projects that include non-human beings. Graduate 0422 0615 sorr@uvic.ca
8

Some Excluded-Minor Theorems for Binary Matroids

Zhou, Xiangqian 2003 (has links)
No description available.
9

Stuff, Universals, and Things: some themes from metaphysics

Islam, Shaheen 2009 (has links)
The problem which spurred this thesis has three components. First, there are entities which we may call stuff – alluded to by uncountable nouns; these entities seem to have a duality for behaving like both (i) an object or a discrete middle size substance – which are supposed to be non-repetitive and independent, and as well as (ii) a concept or a universal – which are repetitive but dependent (on some independent substances). Second, a dichotomy persists between the two aspects of the duality: what is non-repeatable cannot be repeatable and, conversely what is repeatable cannot be non-repeatable. Third, there is a background of how we conventionally do logic, and our present trend of doing – or rather, doing away with – metaphysics. The thesis then came up with four chapters. Chapter 1 deals with the question – how can, or how do we deal with stuff predication following the conventional guidelines? – where by stuff predication I mean any predication involving stuff. I also tried there to find out some clues from Frege’s works. Chapter 2 dives into some related issues pertaining to language, grammar and the notion of constitution. Chapter 3 examines critically two types of theories or views (one of them has been recently championed by Michael Dummett and P.F. Strawson; the other by David Armstrong) arguing how repetitive entities differ from the non-repetitive ones. My counter argument is that those arguments are either fallacious or not even complete. Chapter 4 takes an Aristotelian perspective following the lead of E.J. Lowe. The thesis has a pessimistic tone at the end: the conventional method is quite inadequate as it misses some subtleties pertaining to stuff, nor could Lowe’s Aristotle take us too far. Nevertheless, one cannot – I hope – miss some deeper insights glimpsing into this work. Particularly, Chapter 3 opens up some new venues to think about: our thoughts about our own arguments and proofs may need some revamping.
10

Stuff, Universals, and Things: some themes from metaphysics

Islam, Shaheen Unknown Date
No description available.

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