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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

Cognitive processes mediating the effect of expectations on the perception of interpersonal behavior

Safran, Jeremy David January 1982 (has links)
Theorists from diverse psychotherapy traditions converge in asserting that maladaptive expectations about interactions with other people play an important role in creating and maintaining clinical problems. While there is a consensus that the modification of these dysfunctional expectations is a vital aspect of effective therapy, there is also agreement that these expectations once established, are extremely resistant to change. The present study was conducted to investigate the cognitive mechanisms which mediate the effect of expectations upon the perception of other people. The objective was to explore the nature of these cognitive processes in ordinary social perception, with the hope of providing clinicians with new insights regarding potential therapeutic interventions. Subjects were given one of two sets of expectations about the interpersonal characteristics of a target male actor. They then viewed a videotape of a staged interaction between him and a female actor. Subjects were instructed to indicate subjectively salient events while observing the videotape, using a modified version of Newtson's (1973) unitizing procedure. This was employed as an index of selective encoding of interpersonal behavior. Following the videotape, subjects were administered a memory recognition test which was designed to distinguish between selective memory retrieval and selective memory reconstruction. They then rated the male actor on a series of interpersonal adjective scales. The results confirmed that subjects' impressions of the target person were biased in a manner which was consistent with their initial expectations. Evidence was obtained consistent with the hypothesis that this bias was mediated by the selective encoding of expectation congruent information. No evidence was obtained for the mediating effects of either selective memory retrieval or selective memory reconstruction. The potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed. / Arts, Faculty of / Psychology, Department of / Graduate
32

Loneliness: A study in cognitive discrepancy

Garber, Michelle Marie 01 January 1989 (has links)
No description available.
33

Expectation-outcome discrepancy and social reality as factors in the attribution of success and failure to self and other: an attributional analysis of achievement motivation.

Tennen, Howard. 01 January 1973 (has links) (PDF)
Recent attempts to extend Heider's (1958) attributional model of person perception to the area of achievement motivation have important practical as well as theoretical implications. Specifically, it has been hypothesized (Kukla, 1972) that if causal attributions for success and failure determine achievement-related behavior, then a change in attribution will result in a corresponding change in behavior. The purpose of the present study is twofold: (1) to delineate several parameters relevant to the process of making causal ascriptions for success and failure; (2) to attempt to manipulate attributions, thereby altering achievement-related behavior.
34

Goal setting : unLockeing the research

Isensee, Scott H January 2011 (has links)
Typescript (photocopy). / Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
35

The Expectancy Account of Deception in Negotiations

Wiley, Elizabeth Anne January 2017 (has links)
Who lies in negotiations—and when and why? While research has considered many factors, an important and understudied determinant is people’s expectancies about others. I argue that negotiators’ expectations about other people can help predict their own deceptive behavior. Chapter I explores how projection and pessimism shape deceptive behavior. Studies 1a-1d investigated negotiators’ expectancies and found evidence of projection and of rampant pessimism; negotiators consistently overestimated the percentage of other people who shared their own beliefs and the percentage of people who thought deception was appropriate in negotiations. Study 2 found that expectancies about others’ ethical standards predicted the degree to which negotiators were misleading or dishonest in negotiations. Study 3 manipulated expectancies and found that a higher perceived prevalence of gamers led to more misleading or dishonest behavior. Negotiators’ decisions to engage in deception were heavily influenced by an exaggerated pessimism about others’ ethical standards. In supplementary analyses, Chapter I also briefly addresses how expectancies about a specific counterpart’s level of deception shape deceptive behavior. Finally, Chapter II investigates how stereotypes shape deceptive behavior in negotiations, using the stereotype content model, which suggests that social groups are judged on two primary dimensions of warmth and competence. Study 1 provided evidence that deceptive negotiators are perceived to possess less warmth and greater competence than truthful negotiators. Study 2 showed that people from cold competent groups are perceived as more deceptive than people from warm incompetent groups. Study 3 tested actual behavior and demonstrated that manipulating the social category membership of a counterpart affected deception in a negotiation situation. Expectancies play a critical and understudied role in influencing a negotiator’s decision to be deceptive.
36

Vicissitudes of hope in the Lazarus effect : psychosocial responses of HIV-positive gay men in the post-crisis era of HIV and AIDS /

DeBoer, David Scott. January 1999 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Chicago, Dept. of Psychology, Committee on Human Development, June 1999. / Includes bibliographical references. Also available on the Internet.
37

Investigating the roles of features and priming in visual search

Hailston, Kenneth. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D)--Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2009. / Committee Chair: Dr. Elizabeth T. Davis; Committee Member: Dr. Gregory M. Corso; Committee Member: Dr. Krishnankutty Sathian; Committee Member: Dr. Paul Corballis; Committee Member: Dr. Wendy A. Rogers. Part of the SMARTech Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Collection.
38

VALUE-EXPECTANCY THEORY AND HEALTH BEHAVIOR: AN EXPLORATION OF MOTIVATING VARIABLES

Sennott, Linda Lee Andrews January 1980 (has links)
No description available.
39

The undergraduate students' college-choice decision : an empirical study

Vines, Carol Virginia 08 1900 (has links)
No description available.
40

Attribution, expectation, and recovery an integrated model of service failure and recovery / by Jun Ma.

Ma, Jun. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Kent State University, 2007. / Title from PDF t.p. (viewed Nov. 14, 2007). Advisor: Michael Y. Hu. Keywords: marketing, service. Includes questionnaire. Includes bibliographical references (p. 134-145).

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