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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Decipher Gender and Technology in Car Advertisement

Liu, Ying-hsiu 06 February 2007 (has links)
none
2

Poster presentations and pitch: Gender and Technology, Innovation and Gender

Abrahamsson, L., Wennberg, P. 10 1900 (has links)
No
3

Subject, Body, And Technology In The Discourse Of Cyberculture: The Case Of Wired Magazine

Karadeniz, Oguz Ozgur 01 June 2010 (has links) (PDF)
This study aims to provide an account of the production of subject through the representations of body and technology in the discourse of cyberculture through the analysis of Wired magazine. The findings indicate that the subject produced in this discourse is normatively white and male, and is produced along the ways of liberal humanism as it is conceptualized as autonomous, having free will and preceding the discursive operations and market relations. The production of this subject requires a series of exclusions and abjections including the smart machines which are becoming increasingly humanoid and thus forming a threat to the category of &ldquo / human&rdquo / and to the boundaries of the autonomous subject.
4

Performing on the Screen: An Exploration of Gender Representation in Technology Video Advertisements

Persaud, Subriena 15 May 2014 (has links)
This study investigates the representation of gender in technology-related video advertisements. This thesis quantitatively and qualitatively examined 54 of the most recent commercials by the top nine Fortune 500 technology companies. A total of 407 characters were coded and quantitatively analyzed while the videos themselves were qualitatively assessed with particular attention given to the videos' themes and the interactions between the characters and the technology products and services. Results of the analyses showed that there were more male, Caucasian characters than any other character type based on gender and race/ethnicity. Females were mainly characterized according to traditional stereotypes, such as being linked to the home and expressing emotions. On the other hand, males were most often presented outdoors and conveyed confidence. Overall, the advertisements targeted upper class, Caucasian males while technology itself was associated with power, speed, and progress. These findings have important implications for understanding the persistence of gender inequality in the field of technology and in existing cultural beliefs surrounding gender and technology. / M.A. / Masters / Sociology / Sciences / Applied Sociology
5

Educação, tecnologias e gênero: uma reflexão sobre o androcentrismo na tecnologia / Education, technology and gender: a reflection on androcentrism in technology

Silva, Jane Reolo da 07 February 2017 (has links)
Submitted by Filipe dos Santos (fsantos@pucsp.br) on 2017-03-21T12:47:05Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Jane Reolo da Silva.pdf: 1408996 bytes, checksum: bf27cd79a8dc60f7209bbde9a350540b (MD5) / Made available in DSpace on 2017-03-21T12:47:05Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Jane Reolo da Silva.pdf: 1408996 bytes, checksum: bf27cd79a8dc60f7209bbde9a350540b (MD5) Previous issue date: 2017-02-07 / Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - CAPES / This research is inserted in the line of research New technologies in the education of the program of Post-Graduation in Education: Curriculum, of the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo. Since the 1980s, women have advanced quantitatively in academia and the labor market. However, in the courses and professions of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics ( STEM) the female presence does not exceed twenty percent. This research aims to reflect on the causes of this gender inequity. This research started with the question: What are the causes of gender inequity in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), according to the activists' view of women's inclusion in technology development? It was based on an author-based framework with approaches on the role of gender as an element of analysis of interpersonal relationships such as Scott and Colling. The authors Boix and Natansohn were fundamental for the reflection on gender and technology. Other authors have contributed to the approach of gender relations in basic education such as Auad, Moreno and Lins Machado e Escoura, who analyze the role of education in the construction of a culture in basic education that establishes hierarchies and barriers in gender relations. Vieira-Pinto discusses the use of technology as an instrument of power and Paulo Freire points to the issue of education as an instrument of empowerment in a perspective of deconstructing injustices in gender relations. The methodological trajectory followed the qualitative approach of an interpretative nature. To answer the problem question of this research were conducted interviews with teachers of educational institutions of various STEM courses involved in the Digital Girls Program, an organization that develops training actions, aiming to bring girls closer to the context of computer programming and the STEM area. Research on the interrelationships between gender, technology and curriculum made it possible to identify, among the coincidences of the limitations to the participation of girls as technology developers, patterns of behavior present in the narratives of the research subjects. These patterns were categorized into concrete expressions of gender relations: sexism, misogyny, stereotypes, and gender expectations. A relation was established about the presence in the hidden curriculum of the basic education of a learning of the separation, through daily situations that reproduce the categorized expressions. We conclude through the data collected cultural aspects of gender relations as conditioners of the non-academic and professional choice of women in the area of technology. We point out the need for consideration by public and social policies, as well as the formative processes of educators, the reflection of gender relations in the basic education curriculum / Esta pesquisa se insere na linha de pesquisa Novas tecnologias na educação do programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação:Currículo, da Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo. A partir da década de 1980, as mulheres avançaram quantitativamente nos espaços acadêmicos e no mercado de trabalho. No entanto, nos cursos e profissões da área de Ciências, Tecnologia, Engenharia e Matemática (CTEM ou STEM) a presença feminina não ultrapassa vinte por cento. Esta pesquisa objetiva refletir sobre as causas dessa iniquidade de gênero. Esta pesquisa partiu da questão: Quais são as causas da iniquidade de gênero na área de Ciências, Tecnologia, Engenharia e Matemática (CTEM ou STEM), segundo o olhar de ativistas pela inclusão feminina no desenvolvimento de tecnologia? Foi fundamentada em um referencial baseado em autores com abordagens sobre o papel do gênero como elemento de análise das relações interpessoais como Scott e Colling. As autoras Boix e Natansohn foram fundamentais para a reflexão sobre gênero e tecnologia. Outros autores contribuíram na abordagem das relações de gênero na educação básica como Auad, Moreno e Lins Machado e Escoura, que analisam o papel da educação na construção de uma cultura na educação básica que estabelece hierarquias e barreiras nas relações de gênero. Já Vieira-Pinto aborda a questão do uso da tecnologia como instrumento de poder e Paulo Freire aponta a questão da educação como instrumento de empoderamento em uma perspectiva de desconstrução de injustiças nas relações de gênero. A trajetória metodológica seguiu a abordagem qualitativa de natureza interpretativa. Para responder a questão problema desta pesquisa foram realizadas entrevistas com docentes de instituições de ensino de diversos cursos da área de STEM envolvidos no Programa Meninas Digitais, organização que desenvolve ações formativas, objetivando aproximar meninas do contexto da programação de computadores e da área de STEM. A investigação sobre as inter-relações entre gênero, tecnologia e currículo possibilitou identificar, entre as casualidades das limitações à participação de meninas como desenvolvedoras de tecnologia, padrões de comportamento presentes nas narrativas dos sujeitos da pesquisa. Estes padrões foram categorizados em expressões concretas de relações de gênero: sexismo, misoginia, estereótipos e expectativas de gênero. Foi estabelecida uma relação sobre a presença no currículo oculto da educação básica de um aprendizado da separação, através de situações cotidianas que reproduzem as expressões categorizadas. Concluímos através dos dados colhidos aspectos culturais das relações de gênero como condicionantes da não escolha acadêmica e profissional pelas mulheres pela área de tecnologia. Apontamos a necessidade da consideração pelas políticas públicas e sociais, bem como os processos formativos de educadores a reflexão das relações de gênero no currículo da educação básica
6

Spin-sters: women, new media technologies and electronic/dance music

Farrugia, Rebekah L 01 January 2004 (has links)
The purpose of this project is to understand how it is that women become electronic/dance music (E/DM) DJs and intervene in the dominant discourses and practices of cultural production in E/DM and DJ culture. The three main areas I address are: the impact of the socialization of gender and technology relations, the various ways that women use the Internet to access knowledge and create supportive communities, and finally, the hegemonic representation of women in dominant E/DM culture and how this representation has led to women creating their own communities of practice. I take a cultural studies approach to understanding the communicative strategies women adopt to become DJs. Adopting this methodology requires an examination of the relationships between people, places, practices, and texts. Such an interdisciplinary approach also necessitates drawing on literature from various "studies" areas, including cultural studies, popular music, women's studies, technology, and cyber culture studies. The result is a group of interconnected case studies linked by the ways that each of them addresses distinct aspects related to my central question of how women become DJs. It is clear from my research that the increased integration of women in E/DM is the result of women building face-to-face social networks and creating their own communitiesboth on and offline. In the spirit of the Women's Music movement that started in the 1970s and Riot Grrrl culture in the early 1990s, women in E/DM are increasingly taking on the roles of bookings agents, event planners and promoters, website developers, listserv managers, DJs, producers, and record label owners. Online forums are used to organize offline events like monthly potlucks and public performances, in addition to providing spaces where women can ask questions or share knowledge about all things DJ related. Overall, this project highlights the ways that cultural assumptions, discursive and material practices affect the roles that men and women adopt in E/DM culture.
7

Storing, caring and sharing : examining organisational practices around material stuff in the home

Zarabi, Roshanak January 2011 (has links)
Homes are a much discussed, but little empirically examined resource for action. Material stuff at home offer resources for social, organisational and individual activities that we routinely encounter and use on an everyday basis. Yet their purposes, storing and sharing practices of use and roles in social and organisational actions are hardly touched upon within Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) academic literature. As a consequence of this, there are critical gaps in understanding home organisation and management methods as a means of informing the design of novel technologies. This thesis is an examination of everyday routines in home, paying particular attention to tidying, storing, retrieving and sharing practices. To examine these practices at home, this thesis presents a combination of two qualitative studies using ethnographically oriented methods. Study one (Home’s Tidying up, Storing and Retrieving) concerns the topic of home storage in practice; investigating how householders create and use domestic storage practices and the methods used to manage their storage at home. Study two (Social Interaction around Shared Resources) concerns social interaction around shared resources, and the methods used to manage sharing practices at home. Semi-structured interviews, fieldwork observation, tour around a home, and a photo diary were undertaken to produce a ‘rich’ description of how householders collaborate in storing and sharing set of practices to manage their everyday routines. Several key finding emerged from the research, that are used to identify important implications for design of home organisational technologies, for example to support effective lightweight interactions, providing user controlled mechanism to make different levels of privacy protection for family members, offering effective awareness of family communications and notifications of the activities of other people around these organisation systems, and making available a range of flexible options for family members to access a shared resource. The thesis make the case that flexible systems should be designed allowing people to categorise things in different ways, and have the values of home asserted in technologies, considering factors such as emotion around the use of space in home organisation to make homes become the unique places that they are understood to be.
8

SHIFTING GENDER DYNAMICS IN MULTINATIONAL GHANAIAN MINE JOBS : Narratives on Organizational and Sociocultural Barriers

Kilu, Rufai January 2017 (has links)
Gender is one of the central organizing principles around which social and corporate innovation revolves. The multinational Ghanaian mining is dominated by men and masculinity cultures. To gain an adequate understanding of this phenomenon, it is prudent to explore its gendered nature. This thesis reflects consciously upon the pre-entry, organizational and sociocultural barriers affecting the effective participation of women in mine jobs. And beyond the barriers, it examines what changes have occurred, occasioning a shift in gender dynamics, leading to an increasing number of women participation in the industry? The current thesis adopts a case study method, deploying a mix of quantitative and qualitative approaches; administered questionnaires, conducted individual interviews, observations, archival documents, and focus group discussions with respondents in four mining companies and a mining and technology university in Ghana. The AMOS–based structural equation modeling approach was used to analyze the quantitative data, while thematic and discourse analysis was employed in analyzing the qualitative narratives of the respondents. Results of the thesis point to the social construction of gender in science, engineering and technology education as a pre-entry barrier. Also, a complex web of male-dominance, gender bias, role models and mentorship constraints, coupled with unfriendly family work policies were noted organizational barriers. In furtherance, common prejudices, perceptions and stereotyped notions of gender roles in the mines constituted noted sociocultural factors constraining effective participation of women in mine work. However beyond the pre-entry, organizational and sociocultural barriers, the current thesis intuits a phenomenon of a ‘women’s revolution’ in the mines, witnessing collective efforts from Women in Mining Ghana as well as the mine workers’ organizations and allied institutions adopting gender strategic measures, such as the ‘ore solidarity,’ gender mainstreaming in admission programmes as well as gender-driven mining initiatives aimed at re-engineering or striking a shift in gender dynamics in the mine jobs of Ghana. Consequently, the classic and continuous male-dominance in Ghanaian mines constitute a considerable concern for mine work organizational development, with practical implications for the mining industry, employment, and  labor relation practices as well as public policy in Ghana. Therefore, affirmative action is recommended for gender deconstruction and promotion of gender democracy. Indeed this move for inclusivity will engender poverty eradication work towards achieving organizational modernization, their global competitiveness and an assurance for gender-driven social innovative mining.
9

'Women in Computing' as Problematic: Gender, Ethics and Identity in University Computer Science Education

Sturman, Susan Michele 25 January 2010 (has links)
My study is focused on women in graduate Computer Science programs at two universities in Ontario, Canada. My research problem emerges from earlier feminist research addressing the low numbers of women in university Computer Science programs, particularly at the graduate level. After over twenty years of active feminist representation of this problem, mostly through large survey-based studies, there has been little change. I argue that rather than continuing to focus on the rising and falling numbers of women studying Computer Science, it is critical to analyze the specific socio-economic and socio-cultural conditions which produce gendered and racialized exclusion in the field. Informed by Institutional Ethnography – a method of inquiry developed by Dorothy Smith – and by Foucault’s work on governmentality, I examine how specific institutional processes shape the everyday lives of women students. Through on-site observation and interviews with women in graduate Computer Science studies, Computer Science professors and university administrators, I investigate how the participants’ everyday institutional work is coordinated through external textual practices such as evaluation, reporting and accounting. I argue that the university’s institutional practices produce ‘women in computing’ as a ‘problem’ group in ways that re-inscribe women’s outsider status in the field. At the same time, I show that professionalized feminist educational projects may contradict their progressive and inclusive intentions, contributing to the ‘institutional capture’ (Smith) of women as an administrative ‘problem’. Through ethnographic research that follows women students through a range of experiences, I demonstrate how they variously endorse, subvert and exploit the contradictory subject positions produced for them. I illustrate how a North American-based institutional feminist representation of ‘women in computing’ ignores the everyday experiences of ethnoculturally diverse female student participants in graduate Computer Science studies. I argue that rather than accepting the organization of universal characteristics which reproduce conditions of exclusion, North American feminist scholars need to consider the specificity of social relations and forms of knowledge transnationally. Finally, I revisit how women in the study engage with ‘women in computing’ discourse through their lived experiences. I suggest the need for ongoing analysis of the gender effects and changing socio-cultural conditions of new technologies.
10

'Women in Computing' as Problematic: Gender, Ethics and Identity in University Computer Science Education

Sturman, Susan Michele 25 January 2010 (has links)
My study is focused on women in graduate Computer Science programs at two universities in Ontario, Canada. My research problem emerges from earlier feminist research addressing the low numbers of women in university Computer Science programs, particularly at the graduate level. After over twenty years of active feminist representation of this problem, mostly through large survey-based studies, there has been little change. I argue that rather than continuing to focus on the rising and falling numbers of women studying Computer Science, it is critical to analyze the specific socio-economic and socio-cultural conditions which produce gendered and racialized exclusion in the field. Informed by Institutional Ethnography – a method of inquiry developed by Dorothy Smith – and by Foucault’s work on governmentality, I examine how specific institutional processes shape the everyday lives of women students. Through on-site observation and interviews with women in graduate Computer Science studies, Computer Science professors and university administrators, I investigate how the participants’ everyday institutional work is coordinated through external textual practices such as evaluation, reporting and accounting. I argue that the university’s institutional practices produce ‘women in computing’ as a ‘problem’ group in ways that re-inscribe women’s outsider status in the field. At the same time, I show that professionalized feminist educational projects may contradict their progressive and inclusive intentions, contributing to the ‘institutional capture’ (Smith) of women as an administrative ‘problem’. Through ethnographic research that follows women students through a range of experiences, I demonstrate how they variously endorse, subvert and exploit the contradictory subject positions produced for them. I illustrate how a North American-based institutional feminist representation of ‘women in computing’ ignores the everyday experiences of ethnoculturally diverse female student participants in graduate Computer Science studies. I argue that rather than accepting the organization of universal characteristics which reproduce conditions of exclusion, North American feminist scholars need to consider the specificity of social relations and forms of knowledge transnationally. Finally, I revisit how women in the study engage with ‘women in computing’ discourse through their lived experiences. I suggest the need for ongoing analysis of the gender effects and changing socio-cultural conditions of new technologies.

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