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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Production of Doctorates in Selected Asian Countries - Correspondence

Arunachalam, Subbiah, Gunasekaran, Subbiah 01 1900 (has links)
This article uses figures to compare the production of doctorates in three Asian countries: India, China, and Japan. It particularly compares doctorates in sciences and engineering. By comparison, this article finds that India produced less doctorates than other two countries.
2

The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Hierarchy and its Antithesis

Bernstein, Jay H. January 2009 (has links)
The now taken-for-granted notion that data lead to information, which leads to knowledge, which in turn leads to wisdom was first specified in detail by R. L. Ackoff in 1988. The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom hierarchy is based on filtration, reduction, and transformation. Besides being causal and hierarchical, the scheme is pyramidal, in that data are plentiful while wisdom is almost nonexistent. Ackoffâ s formula linking these terms together this way permits us to ask what the opposite of knowledge is and whether analogous principles of hierarchy, process, and pyramiding apply to it. The inversion of the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom hierarchy produces a series of opposing terms (including misinformation, error, ignorance, and stupidity) but not exactly a chain or a pyramid. Examining the connections between these phenomena contributes to our understanding of the contours and limits of knowledge.
3

Information as a Tool for Management Decision Making: A Case Study of Singapore

de Alwis, Shrianjani Marie (Gina), Higgins, Susan Ellen January 2002 (has links)
The main objective of this study was to develop an understanding of how Singapore's managers behave as information users and determine if their behavioural patterns are similar to their counterparts in other countries (as disclosed in the literature) or if it differs, in what ways. A total of 369 questionnaires were mailed to individual members of Singapore's Institute of Management. Only twenty members responded. The main focus of the survey was the relative uses of the different types of information sources. The survey also touched briefly on the relative importance of domains, and the correlation between hierarchical and functional levels. Results indicated that the types of information considered very important for decision making included Competitor Trends followed by Regional Economic Trends. Types of information considered important included Business news followed by Political, Social, and Supplier trends, Regulatory information, Use of Information Technology, Demographic Trends and New Management methods. Sources given a very high preference rating were Personal Contact for Competitor Trends and the use of Government Publications for obtaining regulatory information. Respondents also preferred use of Government Publications for Local Economic information and the use of Newspapers for Political Trends and Business News. Internal computer printouts were used for forecasting information and company performance. Subordinate managers were referred to for information on the use of technology, Forecasting, and Company Performance. Because the Company Library provided access to newspapers (very high usage) and business news, information about Political Trends, International and Local Economic Information and Competitor Trends were associated with it. However, the Company Library was perceived as a storage facility rather than a dynamic information resource. Local libraries were also used for Regional and International Economic information. Radio and television were used to obtain regional and Local Economic Information in Singapore, but were rated low in accessibility. Very high preference was given to personal contacts as a source of information. Managers in Singapore did not exploit all types of information sources available to them, mainly due to lack of awareness, lack of information skills and lack of accessibility to world news channels.
4

Tagging for health information organisation and retrieval

Kipp, Margaret E. I. January 2007 (has links)
This paper examines the tagging practices evident on CiteULike, a research oriented social bookmarking site for journal articles. Articles selected for this study were health information and medicine related. Tagging practices were examined using standard informetric measures for analysis of bibliographic information and analysis of term use. Additionally, tags were compared to descriptors assigned to the same article.
5

Communication roles that support collaboration during the design process

Sonnenwald, Diane H. 07 1900 (has links)
It is widely acknowledged that design (and development) teams increasingly include participants from different domains who must explore and integrate their specialized knowledge in order to create innovative and competitive artefacts and reduce design and development costs. Thus communication, integration of specialized knowledge, and negotiation of differences among domain specialists has emerged as a fundamental component of the design process. This paper presents thirteen communication roles that emerged during four multi-disciplinary design situations in the USA and Europe. These roles supported knowledge exploration and integration, collaboration, and task and project completion by filtering and providing information and negotiating differences across organizational, task, discipline, and personal boundaries. Implications for design methods, tools and education are discussed.
6

The conceptual organization: an emergent organizational form for collaborative R&D

Sonnenwald, Diane H. 08 1900 (has links)
Analysis of organizational documentation, sociometric survey and observation data from a two-year field study of an R&D organization suggests that a new type of research and development (R&D) organization, called the conceptual organization, is emerging. The conceptual organization relies on and facilitates collaboration in research and development; it is based on a long-term vision that addresses large complex and challenging problems of national and global importance. Its purpose is to work towards this vision, quickly and effectively contributing to relevant dynamic knowledge bases and meeting diverse stakeholder needs with minimum capitalization and start-up costs. To achieve this, it has an explicit conceptual organizational structure in addition to a physical structure, both of which are interwoven across other external organizational and physical structures. Conceptual organizations engage scientists through the appeal of their vision and socio-technical infrastructures that encourage and facilitate collaboration. Challenges for conceptual organizations may arise due to conflicts with traditional norms and practices embedded in university and R&D settings.
7

Extending theory for user-centered information systems: Diagnosing and learning from error in complex statistical data.

Robbin, Alice, Frost-Kumpf, Lee 02 1900 (has links)
Utilization of complex statistical data has come at great cost to individual researchers, the information community, and to the national information infrastructure. Dissatisfaction with the traditional approach to information system design and information services provision, and, by implication, the theoretical bases on which these systems and services have been developed has led librarians and information scientists to propose that information is a user construct and therefore system designs should place greater emphasis on user-centered approaches. This article extends Dervinâ s and Morris's theoretical framework for designing effective information services by synthesizing and integrating theory and research derived from multiple approaches in the social and behavioral sciences. These theoretical frameworks are applied to develop general design strategies and principles for information systems and services that rely on complex statistical data. The focus of this article is on factors that contribute to error in the production of high quality scientific output and on failures of communication during the process of data production and data utilization. Such insights provide useful frameworks to diagnose, communicate, and learn from error. Strategies to design systems that support communicative competence and cognitive competence emphasize the utilization of information systems in a user centered learning environment. This includes viewing cognition as a generative process and recognizing the continuing interdependence and active involvement of experts, novices, and technological gatekeepers.
8

Social Tagging and the Next Steps for Indexing

Tennis, Joseph T. January 2006 (has links)
Social tagging, as a particular type of indexing, has thrown into question the nature of indexing. Is it a democratic process? Can we all benefit from user-created tags? What about the value added by professionals? Employing an evolving framework analysis, this paper addresses the question: what is next for indexing? Comparing social tagging and subject cataloguing; this paper identifies the points of similarity and difference that obtain between these two kinds of information organization frameworks. The subsequent comparative analysis of the parts of these frameworks points to the nature of indexing as an authored, personal, situational, and referential act, where differences in discursive placement divide these two species. Furthermore, this act is contingent on implicit and explicit understanding of purpose and tools available. This analysis allows us to outline desiderata for the next steps in indexing.
9

The Notion of the "Concept Instance": Problems in Modeling Concept Change in SKOS (Draft Discussion Paper)

Tennis, Joseph T., Sutton, Stuart, Hillmann, Diane January 2006 (has links)
The U.S. National Science Foundation metadata registry under development for the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) is a repertory intended to manage both metadata schemes and schemas. The focus of this draft discussion paper is on the scheme side of the development work. In particular, the concern of the discussion paper is with issues around the creation of historical snapshots of concept changes and their encoding in SKOS. Through framing the problem as we see it, we hope to find an optimal solution to our need for a SKOS encoding of these snapshots. Since what we are seeking to model is concept change, it is necessary at the outset to make it clear that we are not talking about changes to a concept of such a nature that would require the declaration a new concept with its own URI.
10

Social Tagging and the Next Steps for Indexing

Tennis, Joseph T. January 2006 (has links)
Social tagging, as a particular type of indexing, has thrown into question the nature of indexing. Is it a democratic process? Can we all benefit from user-created tags? What about the value added by professionals? Employing an evolving framework analysis, this paper addresses the question: what is next for indexing? Comparing social tagging and subject cataloguing; this paper identifies the points of similarity and difference that obtain between these two kinds of information organization frameworks. The subsequent comparative analysis of the parts of these frameworks points to the nature of indexing as an authored, personal, situational, and referential act, where differences in discursive placement divide these two species. Furthermore, this act is contingent on implicit and explicit understanding of purpose and tools available. This analysis allows us to outline desiderata for the next steps in indexing.

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