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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Development of an infrared oven

Unknown Date (has links)
"The purpose of this study was to determine the advantages of cooking or heating individual portions of food with infra-red radiant energy to a condition ready to serve in a minimum period of time"--Introduction. / Typescript. / "May, 1954." / "Submitted to the Graduate Council of Florida State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science." / Includes bibliographical references.
2

Properties of proteins and food products from micronized soybeans

Pg. Metussin, Dk. Rosidah January 1990 (has links)
No description available.
3

Properties of proteins and food products from micronized soybeans

Pg. Metussin, Dk. Rosidah January 1990 (has links)
The effect of infra-red heating (micronization) on the composition and textural properties of full-fat soybeans and its product (soy isolate, soymilk and tofu) were investigated. There was little difference in the overall proximate composition between the micronized and processed soybeans. Yield, protein content and textural properties of tofu made from micronized beans using standard procedures (70$ sp circ$C and CaSO$ sb4$.2H$ sb2$O as coagulating agent) were lower than those of tofu from unprocessed beans; tofu prepared from micronized beans and coagulated at 90$ sp circ$C using a mixture of citric acid (0.01M) and calcium sulphate (0.03M) showed improved characteristics. The microstructure of tofu prepared from micronized beans lacked the regularity of honeycomb-like structure as shown by tofu from unprocessed beans. / Functional, biochemical and nutritional properties of the micronized soybeans, soy isolate, soymilk and tofu were studied. The results indicate the following: the digestibility of micronized soybean (84.3%) was higher compared to the unprocessed soybean (76.5%); the available lysine content of soy isolate, soymilk and tofu from micronized soybeans were higher than the corresponding products derived from unprocessed beans; the unprocessed soybean flour displayed maximum foam capacity at pH 9.0 while the micronized soybean flour showed no foam capacity at pH 3.0 and 5.0; polyacrylamide-disc gel electrophoresis showed that heat treatment by micronization had little effect on the protein constitution of the soybean and on the protein-carbohydrate interaction but induced some interactions of protein and lipid components in the soybeans.
4

Physicochemical characteristics of conditioned and micronised cowpeas and functional properties of the resultant flours

Mwangwela, Agnes Mbachi. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)(Food Science))--University of Pretoria, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references. Available on the Internet via the World Wide Web.
5

Dewatering of fine coal slurries by selective heating with microwaves

Kalra, Aashish. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--West Virginia University, 2006. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains xi, 84 p. : ill. (some col.). Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references.
6

Rapid processing of dye-sensitised solar cells using near infrared radiative heating

Hooper, Katherine Elizabeth Anne January 2014 (has links)
Dye-sensitised solar cells (DSCs) have the potential to be a low cost solar cell candidate due to the relatively low cost of materials and ease of processing. Also, unlike traditional silicon solar cells, DSCs can be lightweight and flexible, and perform well in diffuse sunlight and indoors which make them an extremely attractive prospect. This thesis investigates the time intensive heating stages associated with the fabrication of a DSC which are currently a bottleneck for translating this technology from the laboratory to an industrial scale. In addition some steps associated with the fabrication of a DSC share similarity to other technologies so these methods could be extremely applicable and versatile. Near infrared (NIR) radiative heating was used here to drastically reduce the heating times associated with DSC fabrication steps. NIR heating involves the absorption of NIR photons by the free electrons of an infrared absorbing substrate which releases thermal energy rapidly. NIR radiation has previously been used for the heating of metallic substrates but this is the first time it has been used to heat glass based substrates, which significantly broadens the potential applications of NIR heating. Upon 12.5 s of NIR exposure FTO and ITO coated glass reached significantly high temperatures, temperatures corresponding well to those required for the DSC heating steps. NIR radiation was used to sinter TiO2 working electrodes and thermally platinise counter electrodes on FTO glass in 12.5 s, 144 times faster than the conventional oven heating of 30 minutes. When assembled into DSC devices these electrodes performed identically to their oven equivalents. When combined with a faster dyeing process this enabled the overall laboratory manufacturing time of a DSC to be reduced from 123 min to 5 min with no compromise in efficiency which is an extremely promising step for the viability of DSC commercialisation.
7

Design and development of an infrared heater for waste plastic gasification / by .

Haruon, Zuhair Eltigani Matar January 2013 (has links)
Thesis submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Technology: Electrical Engineering in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology 2013 / This research outlines the design, manufacturing and analysis of a far infrared ceramic heater for waste plastic gasification. The study includes the theoretical overview which concentrated on the mathematical modelling of the far infrared ceramic heater, as well as mathematical modelling of infrared gasifier. Secondly, the study presents an overview of the manufacturing process of the ceramic infrared heaters. Testing of the manufactured heaters has been performed to validate the efficacy of the heaters. The model includes non-grey radiative heat transfer between the different parts of the heaters, conduction in ceramic material, convective cooling of the surface, surface balances, and blackbody radiation theories. Using infrared module voltage as input, model predictions of temperature and wavelengths using Fourier equations were found to agree well with experimental data. The ceramic infrared heaters developed in this research are fully functional and all intended test results were obtained. The spectral analyses of different plastics (Polyethylene terephthalate, Polypropylene, Low-density polyethylene and High-density polyethylene) have been performed. ‘Heat rate’ and ‘cool rate’ of the infrared ceramic heaters have also been characterised. Gasification of plastic waste as carbonaceous material, basic reactions during gasification of plastics, and gasification products have also been discussed, including gasifier properties. The results obtained from the experiments show that using infrared heaters in gasification is practically sound because of the ability of infrared radiation to gasify waste plastics and production of syngas. This project recommended the infrared radiation because of its high efficiency in gasification of waste plastic and the production of syngas. This article reviews the infrared radiation heating and discusses the theoretical aspects of infrared radiation and the validity of infrared radiation heating in gasification of waste plastics. This research also provides a review of literature in the applications and benefits of infrared heaters.
8

Electric Infrared Die heating for Aluminum High Pressure Die Casting

Carl Kuang Yu Shi (9721637) 15 December 2020 (has links)
Casting is a substantial part of modern manufacturing and production, typically used in the production of aluminum alloys. The high pressure die casting process is extremely suitable for mass production. Due to the high volume, wasted time and resources during the production cycle become more significant. Aluminum die castings require the die to be at elevated temperatures to produce acceptable castings. When the inner surfaces of a die are cold, the outer shell of the casting will cool too rapidly, and solidification of the outer shell occurs before the aluminum has time to uniformly fill the cavities. Therefore, without the die being within the proper temperature range, the castings produced will have significant issues in porosity and casting incompleteness. Furthermore, stresses are introduced to the casting surfaces when warm-up shots are used to raise the temperature prior to production. In the present work, research is conducted on designing a heating method for a casting die used in the manufacturing of an automotive transmission intermediate plate. An electric, short wave infrared heating system is simple and effective for the purpose. By utilizing an electric infrared heater in combination with a flat mirror reflector, the aluminum high pressure die casting die was heated to 300 ◦C surface temperature within 30 minutes. Further research can be done to optimize heat flux distribution and minimize energy consumption.
9

Development of finish cooking methods for producing low-fat breaded cheese sticks

Yavuz, Nihat 18 January 2011 (has links)
Deep-fat fried foods have unique characteristics that attract consumers but their high fat contents must be reduced in order to provide healthy foods along with high quality. In the first part of this study, effects of frying temperature and frying pressure on the quality of partially fried breaded cheese sticks were determined. In the second part, far infrared finish cooking methods were compared to traditional deep-fat frying in terms of product quality. Increasing frying temperature significantly (P<0.05) reduced fat and moisture contents of the samples and increased crispness and exterior hardness. Pressure did not affect crust fat content of the samples significantly (P>0.05). However, increasing frying pressure resulted in the samples having higher moisture contents. Crispness and exterior hardness of pressure-fried cheese sticks were lower than traditional deep-fat fried samples. Increasing frying temperature and pressure resulted in darker sample color. Par-fried far-infrared finish cooked cheese sticks had lower fat contents than deep-fat fried cheese sticks had. Moisture contents of far-infrared finish-cooked samples were higher than those of deep-fat fried samples. Far-infrared finish cooking significantly (P<0.05) reduced crispness and exterior hardness of breaded cheese sticks. / Master of Science
10

Infrared assisted through-air drying of lowgrammage sheets / Genomblåsningstorkning av lågytviktsark med infravärme-support

Wallinder, Johan January 2016 (has links)
Through air drying (TAD) enables production of premium tissue products with increased softness, absorbency and bulk. On the other hand, the energy consumption of the TAD process is considerably higher than for conventional tissue drying alternatives. Previous studies on the TAD process have indicated that the drying rate for low grammage sheets is independent of the flow of air through the sheets.   The objective of this work has been to investigate and quantify how drying times and drying rates for low grammage sheets are affected by the addition of external web heating in a TAD process. Moist Eucalyptus and softwood sheets with grammages ranging from 15 to 60 g/m2 were dried in a laboratory process by an air flow through them and an IR-dryer with a variable power output. During drying, pressure drop and air flow were measured and an IR-camera recorded surface temperatures which enabled calculation of drying times and drying rates.   Using the IR-dryer to dry sheets shortened the drying time with at least 20 % and up to 60 % compared to sheets dried without IR-heating. Both pulp types and all grammages showed a linear relationship between drying times and the amount of evaporated water. Mass specific drying rates however, were very high for low grammage sheets and decreased rapidly with increasing grammage. Especially for low grammage sheets the drying rate had a very strong dependency on the IR-power and increased significantly with every increasing IR-power level. This finding implies that heat transfer could be a limiting factor when drying low grammage sheets in the TAD process. Another interesting phenomenon was observed for all grammages of the Eucalyptus sheets. Through these sheets the air flow rate increased with increasing IR-power, something that was not seen at all for the softwood sheets.   To summarize, adding external web heating to a TAD process resulted in a positive effect on drying times and drying rates, especially for low grammage sheets typical for the TAD process.

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