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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Knowledge Sharing Mechanism Under Pragmatic Community Operation-Case Study Advanced Semiconductor Engineering Inc.

Hsieh, Yao-chien 30 August 2004 (has links)
Abstract Two 11th centuries are knowledge economic era, and organization is to individual, create and exert knowledge technology, will become enterprise competition's hinge, on the other hand, organize need to depend on individual to bring forth knowledge, but individual need organization stand by and supply proper environment too, to aggrandizes individual create knowledge motivation, and depend on organization construct integral source net to impel knowledge create process concretize. But enterprise value locality, often consist in hide at personal wisdom mode in, hard to dig ¡CHide in personal in hide knowledge, if can not convert act for organizational knowledge, then knowledge will as personnel leaves but leave organization, result in company wisdom asset's abatement ¡CBut permeate knowledge group's operation under, assistant to enterprise catch personnel in hide knowledge and create organization value best style true. Permeate this research, bring up five biggest research discover, cent mention as follow : discover a, group member skill multiformity assistants to group abidingly operate; Discover two, group inside interacts machine-made establish, benefit to believe in share culture establish; Discover three, usually group activity chief aim consists in hold together relation, establish believe in relationship network unbleached linen; Discover four, organization should intervene group's operation too, encourage formally come up to informal group machine-made; Discover five, practice group's operation, support troop's concept. So, permeate enterprise reality tusk knowledge group's operation under, satisfy organize functional requirement to knowledge management, assistant manufacture innovate, settle problem, disseminate optimum real tusk and impart ingoing personnel with innovation ¡CBut thereinto let members is willing to bring forth knowledge share machine-made appear, critical then consist in believe in machine-made establish ¡CBecause group between has this layer belief's relation, while thereinto certain group member meets problem, can hasten move it participant relative group at problematic guide below, begin make knowledge creation, share with transfer ¡CSo we can say, problematic bring forth will initiate knowledge group close interaction, transform for practice group. Therefore this research think enterprise should as reality tusk group act for ordinary basic framework, at abidingly cultivate expertise with interpersonal belief net unbleached linen establish basis ¡CBy the time problem bring forth time, can settle problem and will should problem-solving style or experience inherit down quickly ¡CSo, can complement tradition be steping function case troop's insufficient place.
2

Transforming Learning in Science Classrooms: A Blended Knowledge Community Approach

Najafi, Hedieh 30 August 2012 (has links)
In this study, I examined how science curricula designed based on the Knowledge Community and Inquiry (KCI) model (Slotta, 2007) would foster the development of knowledge communities in secondary school science classrooms. KCI situates scaffolded inquiry activities within a collective context. In two design iterations, I collaborated with high school teachers to design and implement grade-nine science curriculum units with the topic of Climate Change. Then, I probed the extent to which characteristics of classroom-based knowledge communities manifested in students’ collaborative inquiry activities and the product of their work. In both iterations, students worked for approximately 8 weeks in a sequence of interconnected collaborative inquiry activities, creating digital inquiry artifacts. Two class sections engaged in iteration 1 and created wiki pages about the effect of climate change in Canada. They, then, used these wiki pages to examine the implications of climate change on certain industries. Five class sections engaged in iteration 2 where students identified important climate change-related issues and examined scientific aspects of those issues along with existing remediation plans. Knowledge co-constructed in this collaborative inquiry activity, contained in a Drupal platform, was used to propose improvement to existing remediation plans. Analyzing the process and the product of collaborative inquiry allowed me to examine the extent to which a knowledge community developed in each of the iterations. Findings from iteration 1 revealed that students needed tighter scaffolds during collaborative inquiry activities to stay focused on science connections. Additionally, epistemic scaffolds were added to the designed curriculum unit in iteration 2. Also, students were given regulative scaffolds to plan and monitor their collaborative inquiry. Findings from iteration 2 showed more science connections in co-constructed knowledge and higher amount of collaboration among students while constructing shared knowledge comparing to iteration 1. This study provided further evidence of the effectiveness of KCI model to foster characteristics of knowledge communities in secondary school science classrooms. In addition to elaborating pedagogical and technological scaffolds that facilitated KCI curriculum units, recommendations were made for future research to improve existing scaffolds and, thus, progressing towards knowledge communities that are responsive to curricular expectations of science classrooms.
3

Transforming Learning in Science Classrooms: A Blended Knowledge Community Approach

Najafi, Hedieh 30 August 2012 (has links)
In this study, I examined how science curricula designed based on the Knowledge Community and Inquiry (KCI) model (Slotta, 2007) would foster the development of knowledge communities in secondary school science classrooms. KCI situates scaffolded inquiry activities within a collective context. In two design iterations, I collaborated with high school teachers to design and implement grade-nine science curriculum units with the topic of Climate Change. Then, I probed the extent to which characteristics of classroom-based knowledge communities manifested in students’ collaborative inquiry activities and the product of their work. In both iterations, students worked for approximately 8 weeks in a sequence of interconnected collaborative inquiry activities, creating digital inquiry artifacts. Two class sections engaged in iteration 1 and created wiki pages about the effect of climate change in Canada. They, then, used these wiki pages to examine the implications of climate change on certain industries. Five class sections engaged in iteration 2 where students identified important climate change-related issues and examined scientific aspects of those issues along with existing remediation plans. Knowledge co-constructed in this collaborative inquiry activity, contained in a Drupal platform, was used to propose improvement to existing remediation plans. Analyzing the process and the product of collaborative inquiry allowed me to examine the extent to which a knowledge community developed in each of the iterations. Findings from iteration 1 revealed that students needed tighter scaffolds during collaborative inquiry activities to stay focused on science connections. Additionally, epistemic scaffolds were added to the designed curriculum unit in iteration 2. Also, students were given regulative scaffolds to plan and monitor their collaborative inquiry. Findings from iteration 2 showed more science connections in co-constructed knowledge and higher amount of collaboration among students while constructing shared knowledge comparing to iteration 1. This study provided further evidence of the effectiveness of KCI model to foster characteristics of knowledge communities in secondary school science classrooms. In addition to elaborating pedagogical and technological scaffolds that facilitated KCI curriculum units, recommendations were made for future research to improve existing scaffolds and, thus, progressing towards knowledge communities that are responsive to curricular expectations of science classrooms.
4

The Role of Aggregate Representations in Scaffolding Collective Inquiry

Cober, Rebecca 28 November 2012 (has links)
This study explores how aggregate representations of student-contributed content were used in whole-class discussions to scaffold scientific inquiry in two middle school science classrooms. Working together as a knowledge community, students contribute scaffolded observations concerning HelioRoom and WallCology, room-sized “Embedded Phenomena” simulations, using tablet computers. These observations are collected and represented in aggregate form, and are the focus of teacher-led whole-class discussions. This thesis examines the efficacy of these aggregate designs for advancing students’ and teachers’ engagement in and understanding of the object of scientific inquiry, their usefulness for constructing relational models, and the interaction patterns that arise from their use. Findings suggest that aggregate representations of binary relationships that use tallies are well-suited for learning activities that have directed outcomes, such as constructing a relationship network. Aggregate representations that highlight gaps in data, and areas of agreement and disagreement in the data can be effective tools fostering productive discourse in classrooms.
5

The Role of Aggregate Representations in Scaffolding Collective Inquiry

Cober, Rebecca 28 November 2012 (has links)
This study explores how aggregate representations of student-contributed content were used in whole-class discussions to scaffold scientific inquiry in two middle school science classrooms. Working together as a knowledge community, students contribute scaffolded observations concerning HelioRoom and WallCology, room-sized “Embedded Phenomena” simulations, using tablet computers. These observations are collected and represented in aggregate form, and are the focus of teacher-led whole-class discussions. This thesis examines the efficacy of these aggregate designs for advancing students’ and teachers’ engagement in and understanding of the object of scientific inquiry, their usefulness for constructing relational models, and the interaction patterns that arise from their use. Findings suggest that aggregate representations of binary relationships that use tallies are well-suited for learning activities that have directed outcomes, such as constructing a relationship network. Aggregate representations that highlight gaps in data, and areas of agreement and disagreement in the data can be effective tools fostering productive discourse in classrooms.
6

Action research¡XImplementing Knowledge Management for innovative teaching in Elementary Schools

Lu, Shu-Ping 15 July 2003 (has links)
Action research¡XImplementing Knowledge Management for innovative teaching in Elementary Schools Lu-shu Ping Abstuact Education is a process of guiding learning, communication, knowledge exploration, and implementing knowledge to increase values. Experts have been calling for implementing Knowledge Management as a crucial factor to innovate teaching and to maintain excellence in an educational institute. Especially the prevailing trend of Grade 1-9 Curriculum, students have become the center of a classroom, and daily-life experience has been the focus of curriculum guidelines. This innovative curriculum reform has brought great impact on schools and teachers. Therefore, this research aims to find out how elementary school teachers use Knowledge Management to promote innovative teaching and learning process, to construct a Knowledge Management environment, to implement the functioning and development of Knowledge Management, to increase teachers¡¦ expertise and teaching confidence, to fulfill the curriculum guidelines of innovative teaching in the Grade 1-9 Curriculum, to alter the learning culture in an educational institute, to clarify teaching methodology, to encourage teachers to innovate teaching, and to bring out the best of every student. There are four goals for this Knowledge Management in Shin-Shin Elementary School: 1. To create a beneficial and positive environment for Knowledge Management in Shin-shin elementary school; 2. To discuss the functioning factors for Knowledge Management in Shin-shin Elementary School; 3. To analyze the process, reflections, and influences of applying Knowledge Management in Shin-shin Elementary School; 4. To make a conclusion based on the research findings, and propose concrete suggestions for other schools to apply; In this action research team, there are 6 teachers from the Knowledge Group, 4 formal teachers, one student teacher, and one substitute teacher. They used interpretive action research, and the researchers played the roles of ¡§group leader¡¨ and ¡§knowledge chief.¡¨ Also, they are promoters of knowledge management and observers of different styles of teaching. They jotted down and recorded all the teaching process, categorized the records and shared the information through the Internet. Furthermore, they discreetly recorded the observing journals and reflection journals, held curriculum conference and teaching demonstration meeting, communicated and shared information with one another, and finally used Triangular Examination to proofread those data to increase reliability in analysis. The following are the conclusions and suggestions we have from this research. Constructing Knowledge Management 1. Sufficient knowledge of communication to create a common sense of Knowledge Management at school. 2. Choose assistants to deal with details and filing. 3. Create a cooperative and sharing culture, and the premise for this is to cultivate an open and trusting atmosphere. 4. Use every Wednesday to enhance teachers¡¦ information of Knowledge Management. 5. Make use of the advantages in the organization, integrate resources, and set up network environment. 6. Use the budget well to renew appliances in information technology. Operating Knowledge Management 1. Build up the entrance to Knowledge Map. 2. Use outside resources as knowledge data. 3. Cultivate prospects as Information-Seed-Group. 4. Set up encouragement and bonus strategies to execute Knowledge Management. 5. Assign appropriate Knowledge Chief to assist with teaching information sharing. 6. Do research and interview carefully before choosing candidates for Knowledge Group. Process and Reflection 1. Teachers who are engaged with knowledge learning group should be full of motivation to learn and grow. 2. Sharing teaching experience is the result of making implicit knowledge explicit. 3. Using knowledge management to enhance teachers¡¦ innovative teaching. 4. Organize Knowledge Group to share thematic instruction design, integrated curriculum, and new models of innovative teaching. 5. Using classroom observation indicators to find out teachers¡¦ creative teaching. 6. It is a qualitative change for teachers to better develop expertise and innovative ideas. Factors that influence teachers to engage in knowledge management and teaching innovation 1. Teachers¡¦ positive attitude to engage in cyber-learning. 2. To make teachers¡¦ implicit knowledge explicit. 3. The leading and coordinating of the Knowledge Chief. 4. The spiral system created by personal and organizational knowledge 5. The knowledge and power stored in the database system 6. Teachers¡¦ expertise and professional awareness 7. The effects of promoting Knowledge Management and teaching innovation Suggestions 1. It is beneficial for personal knowledge management and teaching innovation when both researchers and teachers cooperate in Action Research. 2. Every teacher should be a Knowledge Manager. 3. Organize the environment and mindset for Knowledge Management, cultivate the knowledge learning culture, and store sufficient power for knowledge database. 4. Operate Knowledge Management, fulfill curriculum and teaching contents in order to share and innovate. 5. Find out like-minded members who are strongly motivated for innovative teaching, and it will be smoother and easier to achieve the goal. 6. Use school meeting to design related procedures for Knowledge Management and invite experts for counseling and guidance to promote teachers¡¦ professional expertise in teaching innovation. 7. Develop a system of indicators for Knowledge Management for one¡¦s own school, so that we can evaluate the results of the research and innovation. 8. It is feasible for schools to use knowledge management to promote teaching innovation.
7

A Study of Best Answers in Yahoo¡IKimo Knowledge¡Ï

Yang, Chen-kuang 24 June 2009 (has links)
Since the internet appears at the start of 1990s, the society has been changed. Nowadays, the internet has already become an essential part in modern life. The real world¡¦s interpersonal communication, sharing behavior and other interaction ways are all appeared in the internet virtual world. The Virtual Community verified this phenomenon. The Virtual Knowledge Community provided internet users convenient ways to seek useful information. Take the largest Virtual Knowledge Community in Taiwan¡ÐYahoo¡IKimo Knowledge¡Ï as example, its reaching rate exceeded Google Taiwan in only about one year, since the website was launched at the end of 2004. Obviously, the knowledge search service played a very important role in Taiwan. It seems that people can use this service originated from the concept of Web 2.0 to improve their own knowledge experience. However, the virtual world is fictitious because it is filled with good and bad information. Can people distinguish them? Will it influence the users¡¦ cognition and the ability to judge? The research is developed under this issue, adopting Content Analysis method to survey the Best Answers in Virtual Knowledge Community. It tried to prove and find out how the ability of people¡¦s information judgment under the Web 2.0 tendency is. The research found that the Best Answers in different categories are different in their argumentation structure. First, in the category of ¡§Evidence¡¨, the structure is obviously different between the ways Best Answers chosen. Best Answers chosen by asker pay much more attention to evidence than those chosen by voters. In addition, the category of ¡§Information Offering¡¨ played an important role in Best Answers. The significance is more conspicuous than Argumentation Backing and Emotionality Backing. Does it mean the answers provided more information will be chosen as Best Answer more easily? It also reminds us that even the internet and information technology bring this society many advantages and benefits, but we must train ourselves to have depth think and judgment ability, too. Or we will fall into Information Smog and lose our judgment ability.
8

Eine unternehmensübergreifende Knowledge Community für die Medizintechnikbranche

Gleske, Jan-Patrick, Hollenbacher, Jens, Zülch, Joachim 15 April 2014 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
9

Eine unternehmensübergreifende Knowledge Community für die Medizintechnikbranche

Gleske, Jan-Patrick, Hollenbacher, Jens, Zülch, Joachim January 2006 (has links)
No description available.
10

Knowledge Community and Inquiry in Secondary School Science

Peters, Vanessa Lynn 01 March 2011 (has links)
This design-based study was the first empirical investigation of a new model of learning and instruction called Knowledge Community and Inquiry (KCI). In KCI, students are engaged as a learning community as they work on scaffolded inquiry activities that target specific science learning objectives. Although community-oriented approaches have been successful at the elementary level, there has been relatively little uptake of such methods at the secondary school level – particularly in science. The pedagogical framework of KCI addresses the challenges of community models by blending established inquiry based approaches with community-oriented pedagogy. This dissertation tested the validity of KCI by designing, implementing, and empirically evaluating a curriculum based on the KCI model. This was achieved through curriculum trials involving two separate cohorts of grade-ten biology students (n = 102; n = 112). The first implementation consisted of a two-week physiology lesson that engaged students in co-authoring wiki artifacts about human system diseases, which students then used as a resource for solving medical case studies. The second implementation, an eight-week lesson on Canada's biodiversity, was a deeper application of the model, and focused on students' collaborative processes during the construction of their wiki-based knowledge repository. In both cases, the curriculum was evaluated according to its design, enactment, and learning outputs, as evidenced by students' knowledge artifacts and performance on the final exam. Technology scaffolds ensured that students focused on the physiology and biodiversity science curriculum expectations. Analyses of the data revealed that KCI engaged students in collaborative learning processes that were characteristic of a knowledge community. Additionally, final exam scores demonstrated increased learning performance when compared to those from previous years where students did not participate in KCI. The findings from this research provide the first empirical support for KCI, and demonstrate its potential for engaging secondary science students in the kinds of collaborative inquiry processes of authentic knowledge communities. This dissertation provides insight into the conditions necessary for such engagement, and contributes design recommendations for blending knowledge community and inquiry in secondary school science curriculum.

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