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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Māori women and gambling every day is a war day! /

Morrison, Laurie. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Waikato, 2008. / Title from PDF cover (viewed December 18, 2008) Includes bibliographical references (p. 365-377)
12

Nga reo o nga niupepa : Maori language newspapers 1855-1863

Paterson, Lachlan, n/a January 2004 (has links)
By 1855, most Maori still lived in a tribal setting, with little official Pakeha interference. This would have been as they expected, exercising their tino rangatiratanga, the chiefly rights guaranteed by the Treaty of Waitangi. However, their world was changing. In an effort to gain Pakeha goods, many Maori had entered the market economy. Most had converted to Christianity. Many could read and write. Some had sold land to accommodate the increasing numbers of Pakeha settlers. These trends gratified the government. It envisaged a New Zealand society dominated by Pakeha, in which European mores would be norm, and where its sovereignty, gained through the Treaty, would be substantive rather than nominal. At this time, the government pursued the policy of iwi kotahi (one people) or "amalgamation". This policy included the aim of elevating Maori socially and economically by extending to them the benefits of European civilisation. It sought too to encourage Maori to give up their "waste" lands for Pakeha settlement and for Maori to accept the rule of English law, and government authority. Ultimately the two races would become one society- a Pakeha-style society. The government used newspapers for disseminating its message to Maori, publishing the bi-lingual Maori Messenger-Te Karere Maori from January 1855 to September 1863. This thesis investigates the government�s newspaper, plus other Maori language newspapers appearing within the period, printed by government agents, evangelical Pakeha, the Wesleyan Church, and the rival Maori government, the Kingitanga. The thesis not only looks at the impact of newspapers upon Maori society and politics at this time, but also how the newspapers portrayed the major social and political issues to Maori, including the first Taranaki War, the Kohimarama Conference, and the impending all-out war with the Kingitanga in Waikato. Using the newspapers as its major source, this thesis seeks to show how Maori might have understood the issues, and where possible, to allow them to respond in their own voices. We are fortunate that for almost a year the Kingitanga was able to publish its own views in Te Hokioi, thus allowing the anti-government Maori voice to articulate its stand. However, Maori opinion was hardly unitary. The Pakeha-run Maori language newspapers, through reports, reported speeches, and their corresponence columns, provide another set of Maori opinions, which show a variety of opinions on political and social issues. Many histories of this period focus on the tensions and conflicts between Crown and Maori, thus marginalising pro-government Maori, the waverers, and those who merely wanted to keep trouble from their door. This thesis endeavours to illuminate the whole colonial discourse as it appeared in the Maori language newspapers, providing as wide a range of opinions as possible.
13

A discourse on the nature of Te Whanake [kit] : a series of textbooks and resources for adult learners of Maori : a commentary on the body of work submitted for the degree of Doctor of Literature at the University of Otago

Moorfield, John C, n/a January 1999 (has links)
As suggested in the regulations for the degree, this discourse on the nature of the Te Whanake series of Maori language textbooks and resources is being submitted with the series in support of the application for the award of the degree of Doctor of Literature (LittD) at the University of Otago. The purpose of this discourse is to make explicit some of the principles that underlie what is contained in the textbooks, the audio-and videotapes and the teachers� manuals. Some of this commentary repeats information provided in Maori or English in the teachers� manuals. As well as concentrating information about the nature of the Te Whanake series into one document, it is also for the benefit of those who do not understand Maori. This commentary will: outline the author�s background leading up to the writing of the Te Whanake series; discuss the content of the textbooks and resources; make explicit the teaching methodology underpinning the series and how these methods are implemented; explain the principles used in creating the textbooks and tape-recorded exercises; and discuss the pedagogic grammar of the Maori language contained in the textbooks. While the four student textbooks are central to the submission, the total set of resources needs to be considered. The description in Chapter Two will give an insight into what the four student textbooks, the teachers� manuals, the study guides and the audio-and videotaped exercises contain. While the textbooks, teachers� manuals, study guides and audiotapes of the Te Whanake series are original work by the author, the series does draw on the work of fluent speakers and writers of Maori, especially in the more advanced textbooks and supporting resources. This was necessary to expose the learners to a variety of contemporary texts as well as examples by writers from last century when Maori was still very much the language of Maori communities. It seems that by 1929 Maori was being offered as a unit for the Bachelor of Arts degree by the University of New Zealand, although there is conflicting information regarding the precise date when this started. However, it was not until 1951 that the language was actually taught by a permanent member of the faculty at any constituent college of the University of New Zealand when Professor Bruce Biggs was appointed Lecturer in Maori Studies at the University of Auckland.The other universities in New Zealand have gradually followed. The University of Waikato introduced Maori as a subject for a Bachelors degree early in its life in 1970 under the leadership of Timoti Karetu, but the University of Otago, which was established in 1869, only introduced Maori as a subject in 1981 despite having produced some outstanding Maori graduates such as Sir Peter Buck. It was only with the production of the Te Whanake textbooks and resources that a comprehensive series designed to teach Maori as a second language to adults has become available. Prior to the production of these resources the material available for teaching Maori language to adults was limited to a few grammar textbooks, the best of which was Bruce Biggs� Let�s Learn Maori. Other textbooks available were designed for teaching the language to children, the most notable of which are the more advanced textbook by Timoti Karetu called Te Reo Rangatira. There were no Maori language textbooks designed for developing the receptive and productive skills of adult learners of Maori. Some European languages such as English, French, Spanish and German have a variety of helpful and well designed textbooks and accompanying resources for adult foreign language learners. Maori had no such resources. The Te Whanake series provides the basis for a structured Maori language programme from beginner level through to the advanced learner of Maori. While further resources will continue to be added to the series, with the publication in 1996 of Te Whanake 4 Te Kohure and its set of six videotapes there is finally a comprehensive set of resources for teaching Maori to adults.
14

The Power of Music in the Maori Welcoming Ceremony

Gerwig, Rachel 01 January 2015 (has links)
Scholars do not deny that the piiwhiri involves musical movements, but few sources adequately emphasize how intimately the piiwhiri and music are intertwined. Instead of defending a position that has not been directly challenged, but rather skimmed over, this thesis aims to define the what, how, and why questions surrounding the inseparable relationship between music and the powhiri. The goals are to pinpoint the role music plays in the Maori powhiri ceremony and to recognize that the ceremony itself would lose its effectiveness without the use of Maori music
15

Nga reo o nga niupepa : Maori language newspapers 1855-1863

Paterson, Lachlan, n/a January 2004 (has links)
By 1855, most Maori still lived in a tribal setting, with little official Pakeha interference. This would have been as they expected, exercising their tino rangatiratanga, the chiefly rights guaranteed by the Treaty of Waitangi. However, their world was changing. In an effort to gain Pakeha goods, many Maori had entered the market economy. Most had converted to Christianity. Many could read and write. Some had sold land to accommodate the increasing numbers of Pakeha settlers. These trends gratified the government. It envisaged a New Zealand society dominated by Pakeha, in which European mores would be norm, and where its sovereignty, gained through the Treaty, would be substantive rather than nominal. At this time, the government pursued the policy of iwi kotahi (one people) or "amalgamation". This policy included the aim of elevating Maori socially and economically by extending to them the benefits of European civilisation. It sought too to encourage Maori to give up their "waste" lands for Pakeha settlement and for Maori to accept the rule of English law, and government authority. Ultimately the two races would become one society- a Pakeha-style society. The government used newspapers for disseminating its message to Maori, publishing the bi-lingual Maori Messenger-Te Karere Maori from January 1855 to September 1863. This thesis investigates the government�s newspaper, plus other Maori language newspapers appearing within the period, printed by government agents, evangelical Pakeha, the Wesleyan Church, and the rival Maori government, the Kingitanga. The thesis not only looks at the impact of newspapers upon Maori society and politics at this time, but also how the newspapers portrayed the major social and political issues to Maori, including the first Taranaki War, the Kohimarama Conference, and the impending all-out war with the Kingitanga in Waikato. Using the newspapers as its major source, this thesis seeks to show how Maori might have understood the issues, and where possible, to allow them to respond in their own voices. We are fortunate that for almost a year the Kingitanga was able to publish its own views in Te Hokioi, thus allowing the anti-government Maori voice to articulate its stand. However, Maori opinion was hardly unitary. The Pakeha-run Maori language newspapers, through reports, reported speeches, and their corresponence columns, provide another set of Maori opinions, which show a variety of opinions on political and social issues. Many histories of this period focus on the tensions and conflicts between Crown and Maori, thus marginalising pro-government Maori, the waverers, and those who merely wanted to keep trouble from their door. This thesis endeavours to illuminate the whole colonial discourse as it appeared in the Maori language newspapers, providing as wide a range of opinions as possible.
16

A discourse on the nature of Te Whanake [kit] : a series of textbooks and resources for adult learners of Maori : a commentary on the body of work submitted for the degree of Doctor of Literature at the University of Otago

Moorfield, John C, n/a January 1999 (has links)
As suggested in the regulations for the degree, this discourse on the nature of the Te Whanake series of Maori language textbooks and resources is being submitted with the series in support of the application for the award of the degree of Doctor of Literature (LittD) at the University of Otago. The purpose of this discourse is to make explicit some of the principles that underlie what is contained in the textbooks, the audio-and videotapes and the teachers� manuals. Some of this commentary repeats information provided in Maori or English in the teachers� manuals. As well as concentrating information about the nature of the Te Whanake series into one document, it is also for the benefit of those who do not understand Maori. This commentary will: outline the author�s background leading up to the writing of the Te Whanake series; discuss the content of the textbooks and resources; make explicit the teaching methodology underpinning the series and how these methods are implemented; explain the principles used in creating the textbooks and tape-recorded exercises; and discuss the pedagogic grammar of the Maori language contained in the textbooks. While the four student textbooks are central to the submission, the total set of resources needs to be considered. The description in Chapter Two will give an insight into what the four student textbooks, the teachers� manuals, the study guides and the audio-and videotaped exercises contain. While the textbooks, teachers� manuals, study guides and audiotapes of the Te Whanake series are original work by the author, the series does draw on the work of fluent speakers and writers of Maori, especially in the more advanced textbooks and supporting resources. This was necessary to expose the learners to a variety of contemporary texts as well as examples by writers from last century when Maori was still very much the language of Maori communities. It seems that by 1929 Maori was being offered as a unit for the Bachelor of Arts degree by the University of New Zealand, although there is conflicting information regarding the precise date when this started. However, it was not until 1951 that the language was actually taught by a permanent member of the faculty at any constituent college of the University of New Zealand when Professor Bruce Biggs was appointed Lecturer in Maori Studies at the University of Auckland.The other universities in New Zealand have gradually followed. The University of Waikato introduced Maori as a subject for a Bachelors degree early in its life in 1970 under the leadership of Timoti Karetu, but the University of Otago, which was established in 1869, only introduced Maori as a subject in 1981 despite having produced some outstanding Maori graduates such as Sir Peter Buck. It was only with the production of the Te Whanake textbooks and resources that a comprehensive series designed to teach Maori as a second language to adults has become available. Prior to the production of these resources the material available for teaching Maori language to adults was limited to a few grammar textbooks, the best of which was Bruce Biggs� Let�s Learn Maori. Other textbooks available were designed for teaching the language to children, the most notable of which are the more advanced textbook by Timoti Karetu called Te Reo Rangatira. There were no Maori language textbooks designed for developing the receptive and productive skills of adult learners of Maori. Some European languages such as English, French, Spanish and German have a variety of helpful and well designed textbooks and accompanying resources for adult foreign language learners. Maori had no such resources. The Te Whanake series provides the basis for a structured Maori language programme from beginner level through to the advanced learner of Maori. While further resources will continue to be added to the series, with the publication in 1996 of Te Whanake 4 Te Kohure and its set of six videotapes there is finally a comprehensive set of resources for teaching Maori to adults.
17

Whānau coping under the circumstance of multiple job holding : a thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Sociology in the University of Canterbury /

Pere, Huia Matariki. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M. A.)--University of Canterbury, 2007. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-114). Also available via the World Wide Web.
18

Characteristics of traditional and contemporary art and design on Auckland urban marae a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree M.A [Master of Arts] (Art and Design), Auckland University of Technology, Te Waananga Aronui o Tamaki Makau Rau, 2003.

Harwood, Haupuru. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (MA--Art and Design) -- Auckland University of Technology, 2003. / Also held in print (114 leaves, col. ill., 30 cm.) in Wellesley Theses Collection. (T 700.899944 HAR)
19

Landrechte der Ureinwohner Neuseelands in Geschichte und Gegenwart : mit Hinweisen zu internationalen Entwicklungen /

Schüring, Jens A. January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Univ., Diss.--Kiel, 2004. / Literaturverz. S. 231 - 251.
20

Nga Whaiora Tikanga Roanga: Māori Views of Health in Utah

Davies, Sydney H. 01 May 2010 (has links)
This study looked at the health beliefs of Maori who live in Utah, U.S. and examined what ways those beliefs have evolved from traditional Maori health beliefs. It also looked at the conditions and indicators of those conditions that maintain those health beliefs. A New Zealand study found that Maori older than age 45 years were more likely to have traditional health beliefs, whereas Maori younger than age 45 were more likely to have western-based health beliefs. Using grounded theory, the narratives--from two groups, younger or older than 45 years, where each group was composed of eight randomly selected participants--were collected and analyzed. It was found that all participants held traditional Maori health beliefs. Those beliefs were compatible with the construct of the Maori health model as presented in Te Whare Tapa Wha. This Maori model, along with participants, presented health as holistic, comprising components of physical, mental, spiritual, and family. Participants perceived health as having all four elements interconnected, with spirituality being the key element that binds all the others. Conditions that maintained this belief were time in country; acculturation, with racism possibly providing resistance to that condition; enculturation; and spirituality. Participants' spirituality was the key condition of maintaining their Maori health belief that is presented in this study. Enculturation, as a necessary but insufficient condition of Maori health beliefs, was based on indicators of opportunity, location, family, and social support and how these indicators play out over the life course of individuals. The most important indicator for enculturation was family or other social support for individuals to engage in Maori cultural activities.

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