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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Implementing software architecture practices in a new environment

Taylor, Paul Leonardo 2009 August 1900 (has links)
During a discussion with the head of the software infrastructure team about the need for software architecture practices at Temple-Inland Company, the manager responded by noting since the company is not a software development company “there are no real benefits to implementing software development practices in the company”. This is an approach taken by many companies whose software development activity is primarily undertaken to support business activities such as the case with manufacturing or financial companies. This paper examines the process of implementing software architectural practices into an organization. The information contained here should be useful to small startup software companies who might assume that it is too costly to incorporate software architectural practices into their current development process. This paper should also benefit large organizations who primarily view software as solutions for short term immediate support and not in terms longer term strategic goals. Software development teams with projects that suffer from cost overruns, scheduling problems and user dissatisfaction should also find this information useful. / text
2

A grounded theory of software process improvement model adoption

Norman, William Grant. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ed. D.)--West Virginia University, 2007. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains ix, 133 p. : ill. (some col.). Vita. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 83-90).
3

Study on CMMI Requirements Development and Requirements Management to Enterprise Information System Requirements Process Improvement

Hsueh, Ju-Ying 10 February 2011 (has links)
In response to the intense business competition, rapid changes in the response to be non-stop demand for and use information systems to support business operations. Information systems development life cycle, requirements analysis phase is the most difficult to plan with the audit steps, so the effective demand analysis software project outputs will be the key to success. This study for the business information systems requirements analysis and validation process improvement studies to the case company information systems requirements analysis approach for analysis. To explore the requirements process often face the problem of the current situation and to cause analysis, and choose to CMMI Requirements Development and Requirements Management flow field as a guide, the recommended reference to CMMI specific goals and specific implementation method is proposed for the case company information system requirements process improvement recommendations aimed at improving the information system needs of the case company to work quality and output of current problems, and to provide general enterprise information system requirements into CMMI process improvement reference. For enterprises want to import the CMMI, but also needs to provide their requirements management process development and implementation of the field of reference.
4

Research on Taiwan's Software Industry and Its adoption of CMM Model

Lin, Jen-Chuan 29 July 2002 (has links)
Abstract Ever since the early 90¡¦s the global software market has been growing at a rapid speed, even faster than that of the hardware market. Along with the development of Internet and e-commerce, the demands for software have been continuously on the rise. The Taiwan software industry has to improve the quality of its software products in order to compete in the international IT arena. The present best option is for the Taiwanese software firms to achieve the Software Engineering Institute¡¦s Capability Maturity Model certification. This study shows that the obstacles Taiwanese software firms in adopting Capability Maturity Model can be categorized into three main factors: human resources, environment, and technology. Therefore, the software industry must start solving these issues to improve quality and Subsequently attain international standard.
5

A maturity model of evaluating requirements specification techniques

Shin, Yonghee 15 November 2004 (has links)
It is important to evaluate and understand the state-of-art technologies to position our research and invest our energy and resources in more effective ways. Unfortunately, no systematic approach has been introduced to evaluate the maturity of technologies except a few models such as Redwine/Riddle's model (Redwine and Riddle, 1985), which does not contain a significant concept, "goals" of technologies. A new goal-oriented, technology maturity evaluation model has been proposed in this present study. The model aids to measure how a technology meets the goal of the technology along with a well-defined procedure. The model has applied to evaluate the maturity of the requirements specification technology as a case study. The results showed that this approach promoted effectiveness of measuring the technology maturity and understanding the state-of-art technology.
6

Development of a capability maturity model for sustainable construction

Goh, Cheng Siew, 吳卿秀 January 2014 (has links)
Increasing public awareness on the environmental and social growth has promoted the application of sustainable development in construction. The triple bottom line, namely economy, society and environment is generally recognised as significant dimensions for measuring the performance of sustainability. However, most research often puts their focus on environmental issues, rather than the whole sustainability concept. The implementation of sustainable construction also differs greatly from one practice to another, since its definition and principles are still highly debatable. Additionally, it appears that various standards and certifications in the market do not embrace three pillars – environmental, social and economic sustainability in their assessments either. To incorporate the best value of sustainable construction, it is crucial to determine the gap between stakeholders’ expectations and actual deliverables of sustainable construction. Therefore, this research aims to explore and determine the maturity status of sustainable development implementation in the current construction industry. The Sustainable Construction Maturity Model (SCMM) is developed to assist construction stakeholders in gaining a richer understanding on the practices of sustainable construction. Pilot interviews were conducted to determine the appropriateness of research methods as well as to validate the SCMM. The research employed in-depth interviews and case studies as principal research methods to develop deeper insights of the development of sustainable construction, by triangulating data sources. A supplement questionnaire survey was also used to have a meta-analysis on the results obtained. The empirical evidence implies that sustainable construction could be practised at two extremes – exceptionally high and low maturity, regardless of sectors. This large gap suggests that the development of sustainable construction are rather diverged and fragmented in the industry. Although social and economic sustainability may not be absolutely excluded, current sustainable practices tend to put more effort on environmental sustainability. A loss of balance in achieving the three pillars may undermine the full potential of realising sustainable construction. Additionally, the research also found that good coordination between stakeholders is required not only during the design and construction stages but also in the post occupancy stage. Building a good sustainability culture could always bring more significant implications on the maturity status of sustainable construction, rather than the built-in high technology facilities in the built environment. To transform the built environment into a holistic sustainable development world, striking a balance of the triple bottom line is required. This research can steer the construction community to improve their performance in attaining the goals of sustainable construction. The SCMM can also provide an objective and consistent assessment tool to manage sustainable capability and capacity and to position the current performance level. By having a better understanding of the overall development of sustainable construction, practitioners can shape their future directions and strategies better and, in turn move sustainability performance in construction to a higher level of maturity. Since sustainable construction emphasises long terms development, continual efforts shall be made to achieve sustainability. / published_or_final_version / Real Estate and Construction / Doctoral / Doctor of Philosophy
7

Master data management maturity model for the microfinance sector in Peru

Vásquez Zúñiga, Daniel, Kukurelo Cruz, Romina, Raymundo Ibañez, Carlos, Dominguez, Francisco, Moguerza, Javier January 2018 (has links)
El texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado. / The microfinance sector has a strategic role since they facilitate integration and development of all social classes to sustained economic growth. In this way the actual point is the exponential growth of data, resulting from transactions and operations carried out with these companies on a daily basis, becomes imminent. Appropriate management of this data is therefore necessary because, otherwise, it will result in a competitive disadvantage due to the lack of valuable and quality information for decision-making and process improvement. The Master Data Management (MDM) give a new way in the Data management, reducing the gap between the business perspectives versus the technology perspective In this regard, it is important that the organization have the ability to implement a data management model for Master Data Management. This paper proposes a Master Data management maturity model for microfinance sector, which frames a series of formal requirements and criteria providing an objective diagnosis with the aim of improving processes until entities reach desired maturity levels. This model was implemented based on the information of Peruvian microfinance organizations. Finally, after validation of the proposed model, it was evidenced that it serves as a means for identifying the maturity level to help in the successful of initiative for Master Data management projects. / Revisión por pares
8

Proposal of a model of maturity level adapted to the reality of the MYPES of Peru

Ortiz, Victor, Primo, Pamela, Yomona, Melani, Orihuela, Miguel, Sotelo, Fernando, Raymundo, Carlos 01 January 2019 (has links)
El texto completo de este trabajo no está disponible en el Repositorio Académico UPC por restricciones de la casa editorial donde ha sido publicado. / Mypes (Micro and small companies) play an important role in the economy of a country, since they contribute 24% to Peru's GDP, besides being a generator of employment and business development. In this context, the Mypes of footwear continue to have exponential growth, this due to the result of their operations that are carried out with these companies on a daily basis. Therefore, it is necessary to have qualitative and quantitative data of the reality that these present in your business environment. To identify the level of maturity there are several methods, which provide necessary criteria to identify and qualify the processes that exist within the Mypes.
9

Towards a Maturity Model to Measure Organizational Agility in the Software and IT Services Industry

Wendler, Roy 05 October 2016 (has links) (PDF)
Agile software development methods reduce project costs and development time by simultaneously enhancing quality. But despite these advantages, agile principles are rarely adopted by the whole organization. In fact, it seems difficult to describe what distinguishes an agile organization from another. Therefore, the objective of this thesis is to gain an understanding what factors constitute agility at an enterprise level and to develop a maturity model as measurement tool. To fulfill this aim, the thesis as based on a multi-paradigmatic approach combining behavioral and design science and utilizes a pluralistic set of research methods belonging to both paradigms. A comprehensive analysis of agility-related frameworks showed that despite partial similarity there is no consensus about what constitutes an “agile organization”. Hence, the thesis identified the structure to be found behind the concept of organizational agility using an exploratory research approach. A survey among organizations in the software and IT services industry was conducted and showed that organizational agility can be described using six interrelated factors that can be further aggregated into the three basic dimensions of “Agility Prerequisites,” “Agility of People,” and “Structures Enhancing Agility.” Based on these results, the Organizational Agility Maturity Model has been developed providing a theoretically and empirically grounded structure of organizational agility supporting the efforts of developing a common understanding of the concept. The application of the maturity model furthermore creates useful benefits for organizations and underscores the strategic character of organizational agility. It generates an awareness about the complexity of organizational agility. Furthermore, it may serve as a reference frame to implement a systematic and well-directed approach for improvements and continuous assessment of actions taken.
10

Towards a Maturity Model to Measure Organizational Agility in the Software and IT Services Industry

Wendler, Roy 17 June 2015 (has links)
Agile software development methods reduce project costs and development time by simultaneously enhancing quality. But despite these advantages, agile principles are rarely adopted by the whole organization. In fact, it seems difficult to describe what distinguishes an agile organization from another. Therefore, the objective of this thesis is to gain an understanding what factors constitute agility at an enterprise level and to develop a maturity model as measurement tool. To fulfill this aim, the thesis as based on a multi-paradigmatic approach combining behavioral and design science and utilizes a pluralistic set of research methods belonging to both paradigms. A comprehensive analysis of agility-related frameworks showed that despite partial similarity there is no consensus about what constitutes an “agile organization”. Hence, the thesis identified the structure to be found behind the concept of organizational agility using an exploratory research approach. A survey among organizations in the software and IT services industry was conducted and showed that organizational agility can be described using six interrelated factors that can be further aggregated into the three basic dimensions of “Agility Prerequisites,” “Agility of People,” and “Structures Enhancing Agility.” Based on these results, the Organizational Agility Maturity Model has been developed providing a theoretically and empirically grounded structure of organizational agility supporting the efforts of developing a common understanding of the concept. The application of the maturity model furthermore creates useful benefits for organizations and underscores the strategic character of organizational agility. It generates an awareness about the complexity of organizational agility. Furthermore, it may serve as a reference frame to implement a systematic and well-directed approach for improvements and continuous assessment of actions taken.

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