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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The British High Commissioners in Germany : some aspects of their role in Anglo-German relations, 1949-1955

Schwepcke, Barbara January 1991 (has links)
Between 1949 and 1955 the supreme authority in the newly established Federal Republic of Germany did not lie in the hands of the elected representatives, but in the hands of the representatives of the three Western Occupying Powers, the Allied High Commissioners. Surprisingly quickly the character and the role of the Allied High Commission changed and it devolved more and more of its power to the German Government. This thesis recounts the history of the Allied High Commission from the perspective of the British High Commissioner. Three men consecutively held this position: Sir Brian Robertson, Sir Ivone Kirkpatrick, and Sir Frederick Hoyer Millar. They were three very different men, who had different perceptions of their role, different tasks to accomplish, and different degrees of influence on events in Germany and British policy on Germany. The three men are given epithets, which either describe their perception of their role as British High Commissioner in Germany or the role itself, and which serve as themes for the three main parts of the thesis. Sir Brian Robertson was called a "Benevolent and Sympathetic Viceroy" by his biographer, which not only describes Robertson's own perception of his role in Germany, but also is the best indication of the vast powers of the Allied High Commissioners at the beginning. His successor, Sir Ivone Kirkpatrick, was charged with negotiating the end of the Allied High Commission and for this act of self-eradication is given the epithet "The Negotiator". If it had not been for the French delay of the ratification of the 1952 treaties, Sir Frederick Hoyer Millar would have been the first British Ambassador to Germany. Instead he held the title fo British High Commissioner for his first two years in Germany, although for all intents and purposes he was an "Ambassador in Waiting".
2

Public spaces in post-war housing areas : A Swedish and French comparison / Offentliga rum i efterkrigstidens bostadsområden : Enjämförelse mellan Sverige och Frankrike

Papin, Elodie January 2015 (has links)
This master thesis explores and compares through two case studies the characteristics of public spaces in post-war housing areas in terms of appearance and uses in two different countries: France and Sweden. Through observations, interviews and readings, it aims at understanding to which extent public spaces can take part in the creation of social interactions and influence the general perception about such areas, and their importance in such processes. Public spaces play a great role in the democratization, the development and the identity formation of a society and of a place, but in post-war housing areas, criticisms raised about the deadness of these spaces which struggle in fulfilling these important roles. Still, Mermoz (Lyon, France) and Husby (Stockholm, Sweden), the two case studies considered in this paper, showed a different reality. If their structure and organization is still quite characteristic of post-war housing areas, public spaces in these neighborhoods are not the ´empty´, ´blank´ spaces often described in theories, and people meet and interact. Still, it shows some limits in terms of meeting quality, accessibility and attractiveness. Moreover, these areas suffer from really bad reputation due to strong negative connotations attached with ´suburbs´ in these two countries. Public spaces could help in changing this ´image´ by bringing openness, changing aesthetic and creating different kinds of relations between people – by reducing the dominance of groups of young men and the drugs traffic that often characterize public spaces in these areas for instance. Still, changing an image of an area and creating different social interactions is a much more complex process that has to take into account several factors including public spaces, buildings, employment rates, education etc.
3

Theory, politics and cultural practice in the plays of Caryl Churchill

Adiseshiah, Sian Helen January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
4

Leadership in Western European multilateral diplomacy, 1947-1951 : Britain in Marshall Aid negotiations and France in the Schuman Plan negotiations

Taalas, Janne January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
5

The economic dimensions of the Marshall Plan in Greece, 1947-1952

Vetsopoulos, Apostolos January 2002 (has links)
This thesis concerns the economic dimensions of the Marshall Plan in Greece from 1947 to 1952. The Marshall Aid Program and Mission contributed to the reconstruction and development of the Greek economy after the destruction of World War II and the Greek Civil War. However, because of the shortcomings of its backward economy, Greece was a special case in the implementation of the Marshall Plan in Europe. In particular, the problems of inefficiency and corruption influenced political and social issues on the decision-making process, while uniquely, the Marshall planners tried to create institutions in order to facilitate reconstruction and to improve Greek people's life. The implementation of the Marshall Plan aimed at the development of the Greek economy parallel to the economic development of the other European countries. The Marshall Plan tried to help the backward Greek economy participate in international trade, and created the foundations for the post-war development of the Greek economy. The principal argument of the thesis is that the Greek economy was too weak to absorb fully the enormous aid granted because private and state investments were too negligible to meet further economic development, while a number of Greek politicians and bourgeoisie prevented the implementation of the economic programme. This forced the American Marshall planners to 'freeze' a great part of the aid in order to cover the budget deficit and to hold inflation. The 'frozen' aid 'counterpart funds' were utilised in the two fiscal years following June 1952. Therefore, in the post-war period, the Marshall Plan was the first systematic effort to stabilise the Greek economy, thereby in due course enabling Greece to join the European Economic Community in 1980.
6

Rural property rights and the survival of historic landed estates in the late twentieth century

Jackson, Andrew John January 1999 (has links)
This thesis examines the evidence for the decline and survival of historic landed estates since the end of the nineteenth century. The focus is on the processes of adaptation undergone by those estates that have survived over the post-war period. These processes are described in this study as a 'compromise' of 'traditional' landed estate characteristics. The particular approach taken by this research is to focus on the manipulation of property rights as a way of comprehending estate survival strategies. The work observes how various forms of legislation and the emergence of other powerful interest groups have acted to increasingly constrain the rights of rural landowners. A conceptual framework indicates how wide-ranging political, economic and social changes, and alterations to family circumstances, are reflected in the changing division and sub-division of owner, occupier and user rights over historic landed estates. The research is based on a micro-level investigation of an estate in south-east Devon. It examines how the political activities of the estate's owners represent attempts made by them to publicise their position and to defend their property rights. Subsequently, the study investigates the evolution of the estate over the post-war period in terms of its ownership and management, size, occupancy, economic activities, and local relations. Particular attention is paid to a series of 'critical' moments when changing circumstances required the formulation of major survival strategies. The study examines the central place of property rights and their accompanying responsibilities, observing how the allocation and re-allocation of property rights has become particularly fluid, complex and contested, and how the manipulation of property rights represents the response of estate owners to both opportunities and threats. The findings of the case study are also considered more broadly, that is, in relation to the position of rural landowners in general in the late twentieth century countryside
7

The politics of nationalism under communism in Bulgaria : myths, memories and minorities

Mahon, Milena January 2001 (has links)
This study is devoted to politics of nationalism under Bulgarian communism (1944-89). The research aims to analyse the actual content of the Bulgarian communist policies on three main national questions and the ideas behind them. How did Bulgarian communism understand nation and nationalism? How did the Bulgarian Communist Party policy on issues of nationalism change over time? What was the legacy of communist politics of nationalism after the fall of the regime in 1989? This thesis focuses on three national questions in Bulgaria: `the Macedonian Question', the position of the ethnic Turkish minority, and the politics of Jewish identity. It argues that revealing the ideas behind the communist policies in relation to these questions explains how communism understood national identity in Bulgaria. Chapter 1 provides an overview of theories of nationalism and communism in relation to Bulgarian communism. Chapter 2 analyses the understanding of communist internationalism and nationalism of the founders of Bulgarian communism and their followers in the contest of Marxism, Marxism-Leninism and Stalinism. Chapter 3 discusses Bulgarian communist mythology and argues that under communism Bulgarian national mythology was at the basis of promoting cultural nationalism which in its own turn was used for political mobilisation against ethnic diversity. Chapters 4,5 and 6 are dedicated to the three national questions mentioned above and their development under communism. Chapter 7 examines politics of nationalism after the fall of the communist regime in Bulgaria in 1989 and argues that by promoting cultural nationalism based on ethnic homogeneity the policies of the BCP in relation to ethnic minorities determined the politics of nationalism during post-communism in Bulgaria. The chapters are linked by the argument that Bulgarian communism changed its original idea of building a communist ration-State as a political community with class identity at its core to building an ethnically homogenous nation-state with ethnic Bulgarian identity as its organising principle.
8

Fedor Abramov and the poetics of Russian village prose

Baikovitch, Gilda Odette Felicienne January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
9

Social change and educational problems in three modern Asian societies, Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong : a comparative study

Lee, Wing On January 1988 (has links)
The main theme of the thesis is a discussion of education and social change in the three East Asian societies over the post-war period. The thesis is divided into four sections. The first is a background study. In this section, the social and educational backgrounds of the respective societies are discussed. Special attention is paid to the stress on modernization as a common orientation in social developments. Major concepts and definitions of modernization are discussed and an attempt is made to study the modern development of these societies in the light of modernization theories. The second section is a discussion of education in technological societies. The concepts of industrial, post- industrial and technological societies are discussed in the light of the works of the major social theorists and futurologists. The development of technology and its relationships with education are outlined. Further, the social implications and problems of technological and scientific education are analysed. The third section is a discussion of education in rapidly changing societies. The acceleration of social change in modern societies is traced. Rapid changes in the educational scene of the respective societies are also outlined. The social implications and problems of the rapidity of change and the role and functions of education in face of rapid change are discussed. The fourth section is a discussion of the emergence of credentialism in modern societies and its manifestation in education. Negative aspects of diplomaism, excessive competition and examination systems are discussed. In conclusion, an overall review of the relationships between education and social development is made. There is an analysis of the fundamental educational problems of modem societies, and finally, in this context, a suggestion that the objectives of education should be reconsidered.
10

Towards an acceptable past? : variable reflections of the Italian Resistance 1945-1995

Leaver, Jennifer Dianne January 2001 (has links)
No description available.

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