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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Connecting schools and communities : a case study of prekindergarten collaboration

Morales, Vanessa Beltran 06 November 2014 (has links)
In an effort to increase access to public prekindergarten programs, many states are linking school- and community-based early childhood education (ECE) providers together to jointly deliver services. This strategy leverages existing ECE programs as part of the ongoing expansion of state-funded prekindergarten. Understanding how these efforts unfold at the local level is important for future policymaking that seeks to address the provision and improvement of publicly funded ECE programs. This dissertation explores how prekindergarten collaboration members work together, influence one another, and contribute to increased alignment within the field of ECE. This research presents findings from a case study that examined prekindergarten collaboration in one Texas community. Data were collected primarily through semi-structured interviews with individuals directly involved in prekindergarten collaboration implementation or with families served through public prekindergarten. Findings show that the depth and nature of the partnerships in this effort varied by the location of services and level of support made available to collaboration members. Key program features, such as classroom structure, instruction, and curriculum, were aligned across all three programs. Based upon these findings, I discuss the potential implications for policy and practice and suggest further topics of study related to these issues. / text
2

Impact Of The Education Level Of Voluntary Prekindergarten Teachers Upon Kindergarten Student Readiness Rates

Wright, Teresa 01 January 2012 (has links)
This study addressed the problem of insufficient information concerning the impact of variability in requirements and credentials for Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) teachers statewide on VPK program quality. This study examined the variance in the professional credentials of VPK lead instructors in Florida school districts and whether or not this variability makes a significant difference in program quality as measured by VPK Provider Kindergarten Readiness Rates. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) statistical tests were conducted, as appropriate, for each of four research questions. Research findings indicated there was no statistically significant difference in the mean VPK Provider Kindergarten Readiness Rates based on the professional credentials for VPK lead instructors when controlling for the socio-economic status of the children enrolled at each site. Recommendations were made for future research to replicate the study using a different indicator of program quality, perhaps a measure of student progress throughout the school year. Also, the first groups of students to participate in Florida’s voluntary prekindergarten (VPK) program are now enrolled in upper elementary grades making a longitudinal study both feasible and worthwhile in evaluating the effectiveness of a largescale preschool program. The researcher further recommended that the idea of improving the qualifications of the prekindergarten workforce must persist, supported by continued research and adequate funding.
3

Do Prekindergarten Teachers Design Their Classrooms to Enhance Early Literacy?

LoRusso, Joann 17 December 2010 (has links)
Young children develop language and early literacy interactions that are the building blocks for future skilled reading. This study was designed to evaluate the early childhood classroom to determine teachers‟ knowledge of early literacy. Based on the Literacy Environment Checklist (LEC) of the Early Literacy and Language Classroom Observation (ELLCO) tool, the classrooms scored 100% proficiency in the Book Area and Book Selection categories. The results indicate the prekindergarten teachers knew how to design their classrooms to enhance early literacy. The classrooms scored 86% proficiency in the Writing Materials category, 73% proficiency in the Writing around the Room category, and 58% proficiency in the Book Use category. These results indicate that the teachers did not utilize early literacy materials or did not have necessary early literacy materials in the classrooms. Many of the teachers had minimal early literacy training. Without specific early literacy training, teachers did not design their classrooms in ways that would enhance early literacy.
4

The Role of Parents as Formal Math Instructors of Prekindergarten Children

Blanch, Monica Jane 01 May 2002 (has links)
This study was designed to explore the relationship between maternal attitudes about math, mothers' attitudes about their prekindergarten child's math abilities, mother-child math interactions, and prekindergarten children's math achievement. Using a Vygotskian framework, an intervention was developed. An intervention group of 18 mother-child dyads from Hyrum, Utah, area and a comparison group of 17 mother-child dyads from the Weston, Idaho, area were invited to participate in this research project. Measures included the Early Mathematics Concepts (EMC) assessment, the School Readiness Composite (SRC) of the Bracken Basic Concepts Scale-Revised (BBCS-R), My Attitudes Scale (MAS), and My Attitudes About My Child's Abilities Scale (MAAMCAS). Research hypotheses predicted that the intervention group would score higher on the EMC and each of the EMC's four focus areas at the posttest. Results did not support these hypotheses. Research hypotheses also predicted that the intervention group would have a larger difference in MAS and MAAMCAS scores from pretest to posttest and .that MAS and MAAMCAS scores would predict EMC scores. Neither of these hypotheses was supported. The final research hypothesis predicted a relationship between EMC focus area scores and mathrelated subscales of the BBCS- R. The strongest relationship appeared to be between the EMC number focus and the BBCS-R number subscale. The results were interpreted in accordance with current research and possible limitations of the present study.
5

The Prevalence of Visual Impairments of the Prekindergarten Children in Georgia and Evaluation of Associated Risk Factors

Huang, Yuqi 05 December 2008 (has links)
Vision impairment is recognized as a global public health problem. Children are the most susceptible population to many of the vision diseases. Knowledge of the causes and prevalence of common types of visual impairments is important for planning of preventive health care services to ensure that the children receive proper eye care in a timely manner. The purpose of this thesis is to describe the prevalence of visual impairment and to identify associated risk factors among the prekindergarten children in Georgia. During August 2005 to May 2006, there were 30,115 prekindergarten children enrolled in the Prevent Blindness Georgia Children Vision Screening Program, and a total of 25,543 (84.8%) children received vision screening. A total of 1,345 (5.27%) children had visual impairments and were referred to take an eye exam. Over 80% of the children who were referred and received eye exams were found to have vision problems. Timely screening is one of the effective ways for early detection of vision problems among these children. This study showed there were significant differences in the screening rate between the children with high socioeconomic status and those with low socioeconomic status. Educational and promotion programs should focus on improving the knowledge of vision diseases and use of available preventive service, particularly by the community of low socioeconomic status.
6

Young children's play using digital touchscreen tablets

Carrell Moore, Holly Lynne 01 July 2014 (has links)
National early childhood organizations have posited that technology tools might be used to expand young children's thinking and experiences if offered in playful ways, and organized with interactive activities that allow for individualization and social interaction (NAEYC & Fred Rogers Center, 2012). Furthermore, these organizations have argued for the need to study newer technologies such as touch-screen technologies (NAEYC & Fred Rogers Center, 2012). The purpose of this study is to examine young children's technology-related play choices and actions particularly as they occurred with touch-screen tablets in a classroom setting. The 10-week qualitative study, organized around a classic grounded theory methodology (Glaser, 1978, 1992, 1998) and conducted within a single classroom, reports the close observation and description of 14 public- school pre-kindergarten students' actions with open-ended, symbolic-play tablet apps and interactions with one another, toward building a grounded theory of children's socially situated, tablet-centered digital play. The findings of this study demonstrate how participants' play choices were situated within multiple nested social spheres, including layers of digital play, the iPad activity-center, and the classroom as organized by the teacher. Examination of children's changeable play actions and choices revealed students' use of reflexive tracking as they actively navigated between personal and social interests to engage in three types of play: sampling, experimenting, and engaging in pretense. The findings and theorized model of socially situated dual-tablet play inform the discourse on technology integration in early childhood classrooms as well as the discourse on play, particularly in regards to digital play. / text
7

The Impact of Early Childhood Education on Academic Achievement

Davis, Jodi 12 1900 (has links)
Two groups of students were compared to determine the impact of early intervention at the Early Childhood School on academic outcomes in later elementary school years for both math and reading. Students who were determined to be disadvantaged in some way, either by income, limited English proficiency, or having been identified as needing specialized instruction and who attended an early intervention program, prior to kindergarten, were compared to a similar group who did not attend the intervention program. Scores on district level assessments in math and reading were tracked for both groups of students through the third grade. Scores on high stakes standardized testing of the students in third grade were also analyzed. Results indicated that students in the control group outperformed students in the treatment group on the majority of district level assessments. However, the opposite was true for high stakes testing where the treatment group outperformed the control group on a consistent basis. These results were consistent, regardless of the nature of the disadvantage. Students who attended the prekindergarten program at the Early Childhood School had higher scores on the State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness (STAAR) exam than disadvantaged students who did not attend. Since this was not the case for district level assessments, it is recommended that the district revisit their local assessments and testing administration practices. It is also recommended that this cohort of students continue to be studied to see of the outcomes last beyond the third grade.
8

Investigating the Virginia Preschool Initiative's Role in Preparing Students for Kindergarten

Lyle, Douglas Wayne Jr. 23 March 2020 (has links)
Although many children enter kindergarten having some form of preschool experience, the quality of these experiences differs greatly among the programs that are available to families. This variability can create school readiness gaps, especially for children from disadvantaged backgrounds (Isaacs, 2012). Children not being ready for school has come to the attention of stakeholders around the country and in the Commonwealth of Virginia. According to a state-wide study, approximately 30% of the students entering Virginia's schools either were not ready academically and/or behaviorally (Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission [JLARC], 2017). Fortunately, the Virginia Preschool Initiative (VPI) program was created to give students with the greatest risk of school failure an opportunity to overcome potential learning obstacles. The general purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a state-funded prekindergarten program in a rural school division in Central Virginia. Specifically, this study examined academic and behavioral data for four cohorts of kindergarten students to determine if students who participated in the VPI program performed better on school readiness measures compared to their peers without any preschool or prekindergarten experience. Two-tailed t-tests were used to determine if any significant differences existed on measures of literacy, mathematics, self-regulation, and social skills between students who attended a state-funded prekindergarten program to their peers without any prekindergarten or preschool experience. / Doctor of Education / Children not being ready for school has come to the attention of stakeholders around the country and in the Commonwealth of Virginia. According to a state-wide study, approximately 30% of the students entering Virginia's schools either were not ready academically and/or behaviorally (Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission [JLARC], 2017). Fortunately, the Virginia Preschool Initiative (VPI) program was created to give the students with the greatest risk of school failure an opportunity to overcome potential learning obstacles. The general purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a state-funded prekindergarten program in a rural school division in Central Virginia. Specifically, this study examined academic and behavioral data for four cohorts of kindergarten students to determine if students who participated in the VPI program performed better on school readiness measures compared to their peers without any preschool or prekindergarten experience.
9

Climbing the Mountains: The Journey to Quality Prekindergarten in Tennessee

Isbell, Rebecca 01 January 2014 (has links)
The state of Tennessee was the ideal place to implement Pre-K programs because of the number of children living in poverty, health-care issues, and student’s poor performances on academic measures. This chapter will explore the development of Pre-K, the use of pilot programs, the major expansions, and the period of sustainment. The fi nal section will identify lessons learned and recommendations for expansion of quality Pre-K programs for all young children.
10

Father-Child Interactions at 24 and 36 Months and Developmental Outcomes at Prekindergarten

McMurdie, Shareesa L. 01 May 2012 (has links)
This study looked at father teaching interactions and singing in toddlerhood as predictors of child cognitive and language outcomes at prekindergarten in a low-income, ethnically diverse sample. Results found that, overall, father teaching interactions in toddlerhood predicted child cognitive and language outcomes at prekindergarten and father singing in toddlerhood predicted language outcomes. Fathers provided slightly more teaching interactions at child age 24 months than at 36 months, and sang more frequently at 36 months. Within ethnic groups, father teaching interactions were statistically significant in predicting cognitive and language development outcomes for children of African American (approached significance for language outcomes) and European American fathers, but not for children of Latino American fathers. Father singing in toddlerhood approached significance for language outcomes at prekindergarten for children of European American and Latino American fathers, but not for children of African American fathers. Overall, father behaviors were found to positively predict child outcomes, suggesting that fathers provide an independent additive contribution to children’s developmental skills that reflect school readiness. Independently of what mothers do, fathers play a unique role in child development and provide positive parent-child interactions that support children’s early development.

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