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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Pupil identity formation with special reference to the black adolescent

Mathunyane, L. H. 11 1900 (has links)
The research was undertaken to determine the way in which the Black adolescent forms a pupil identity. Special attention was focussed on the various relationships formed by th~ Black adolescent within and outside the school environment. Literature indicates that pupil-identity is one of a variety of identities formed. Once a positive pupil-identity is established, the adolescent is in a position to actualise himself adequately. The empirical research was undertaken by administering a questionnaire to 555 Black secondary school pupils. The questionnaire comprised four categories namely, the adolescent's relationship with the self, parents, peer-group and the school. It was found that each of the four categories showed a significant positive correlation with pupil-identity formation. As this research project could not cover all aspects of the Black adolescent, recommendations for future research have been made. / Psychology of Education / M.Ed. (Psychology of Education)
12

Researching the educational setting for quality data : the case of an 18-school research project in the Western Cape

Dion, Roger Eugene January 1995 (has links)
Bibliography: pages 48-50. / Through the analysis of an 18-school research project that was conducted in the Western Cape in 1994, the aim of this report is to emphasize the need for and importance of effectively researching the educational setting in order to obtain quality data. This task will take the form of a general discussion concerning "what information..." should be collected and "how..." it should be "collected, analyzed, and interpreted" from the perspective that it is "critical to remember that decision-makers require information to be provided promptly... in order to make informed policy decisions" (Ross & Postlethwaite, 1992:1-2).
13

Youth culture and discipline at a school in the Western Cape

Carstens, Carin 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MEd)--Stellenbosch University, 2013. / Bibliography / Internationally, contemporary youth struggle to make sense or meaning of their lives. That is so because they live in a world where they daily witness unsolvable problems of struggling economies, poverty, HIV, and religious and national conflict, and where they are generally treated with ambivalence and a threat to the existing social order. Youth also struggle because within the public imagination they exist on the fringe of society. Giroux (2012: 2) argues that youth are given few spaces where “they can recognise themselves outside of the needs, values, and desires preferred by the marketplace” and are mostly subjected to punitive and zero tolerance approaches when they behave in unacceptable ways. In South Africa presently, it is generally claimed that “discipline problems” amongst youth have become the most endemic problem in South African schools, with policy makers and educators daily complaining about the disciplinary problems within schools that affect how learners engage with learning. Equally, discipline as punitive coercion has been shown to be an unsuccessful educational method in dealing with youth (Porteus & Vally 1999). With the above schooling challenge in mind, this qualitative study explored the views of thirteen young learners at Avondale High School in the Western Cape on school discipline. Via semi-structured interviews, the youth were asked about their understandings of the rules, disciplinary structures, forms of authority and order at the school, how they interpreted the role of discipline, and how they thought this would influence the futures awaiting them. The goal of the study was to provide a multi-dimensional view of what youth regarded as discipline at one school, and to explore whether different learners adopted different meanings of ‘discipline’ according to the context of their individual lives. I show in the study - utilising the views of Emile Durkheim, Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu - that school discipline needs to be thought of as more than punishment or structures of ordering per se if it is to play a productive role in the functioning of schools. Along with Yang (2009: 49) I suggest that only when schools recognise that discipline has multiple meanings and (limited) roles within their daily functioning, will the emancipatory and transformative possibilities of school discipline be unlocked. For that to happen, the voices and views of youth in schools have to be taken account of, and meaningful relationships developed between learners, educators, and school management.
14

The influence of school culture on HIV/AIDS beliefs in an urban school : an education management perspective

Siwela, Miriam Farai 10 1900 (has links)
The UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic (2010:9-11), stated that for the estimated 33.3 million people living with HIV, sub-Saharan Africa has a staggering 22 500 000: South Africa having the highest figure of 5 600 000. The question arises: Why has HIV/AIDS spread faster in Africa than on any other continent, despite similar international strategies? The challenge in Africa is that several HIV/AIDS beliefs and misconceptions distorting management of HIV/AIDS. South African learners receive HIV/AIDS education from the school culture, community, government and the international community, whereas they should be partners in collaborative education: yet, they are not. The research finding indicated that for effective educational strategies, education managers should be aware of these different voices affecting HIV/AIDS education. Education managers should be the main voice in dealing with this menacing epidemic. Countries that have approached HIV/AIDS scientifically and speak with one voice successfully reduced their HIV/AIDS statistics. / Educational Leadership and Management / M. Ed. (Education Management)
15

The professional development of educators as a key factor in the promotion of culture of learning in Johannesburg South district schools

Tshisikule, Mbulahiseni Joseph 12 1900 (has links)
The study deals with the professional development of educators as a key factor in the promotion of the culture of learning in Johannesburg South District. The aim was to determine the impact of professional development workshops in Johannesburg South district schools. A literature review was used to establish what other scholars say about the concept of professional development. Thereafter, a qualitative study was conducted. Data was gathered during interviews, based on pre-planned interview questions. Ten experienced participants were selected by using purposive sampling and asked about their perceptions and experience of professional development in the Johannesburg South District. The recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed to explore educators’ insights about professional development in the district. Findings indicate that educators wish to be rewarded with certificates of attendance or monetary incentives after attending professional development workshops presented by knowledgeable facilitators, and they also wish to collaborate with teachers from other districts. / Educational Management and Leadership / M. Ed. (Education Management)
16

The role of cultural diversity on social wellness in a primary school in Gauteng

Nkomo, Annah Ndlovu 04 1900 (has links)
This study investigates the role of cultural diversity on social wellness in a diverse school setting. It explores the views of learners and teachers on issues pertaining to cultural diversity and social wellness in the school. An integrative lens encompassing Hettler’s (1970) wellness theory and Letseka’s (2000) Ubuntu principle were used as the framework to guide the study. The interpretivist paradigm was used because the research method for this study is qualitative in nature. Purposive sampling was used in this study where fifteen participants were selected. The approach used is a case study, with the case being a multicultural primary school in Gauteng Province, South Africa. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Unisa’s Ethics Committee. Furthermore, permission was granted by the Department of Basic Education and the school’s principal. All participants signed consent and assent letters before data were collected. Learner participants gave their assent to take part in the study after consent had been obtained from their parents and guardians prior to the commencement of data collection. Data collected reflected the participants’ understanding of the need and means to promote social wellness within a culturally diverse school setting. It also suggests that it is possible to make diversity work for, instead of against us as is advocated for by Sheets (2005). The themes that emerged from collected data were: knowing one another as well as each other’s cultures, respect for equality and human dignity, loving kindness and compassion towards everyone, practicing good manners and discipline towards everyone, positive social interaction/desired attitude and also leading by example. These themes form guidelines that can be used in promoting social wellness in the school. / Inclusive Education / M. Ed. (Inclusive Education)
17

Die klassifikasie van onderprestering en die implikasies daarvan op skoolkultuur

Arnolds, David 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MEd)--Stellenbosch University, 2013. / Bibliography / AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die interpretering van beleid en die toepassing daarvan in die werkplek was nog altyd ’n aanvegbare aspek, omdat beleid nie ’n geslote entiteit is nie en dus oop is vir verskillende interpretasies deur die toepassers van beleid. Die aanvegbaarheid van beleid kan duidelik waargeneem word met die toepassing van die Nasionale Assesserings Beleid van 1998 op die Suid-Afrikaanse skoolgemeenskap. In hierdie trant is die hoofdoel van my studie om ondersoek in te stel na die implikasie wat die toepassing van beleid rakende die klassifikasie van primêre skole as onderpresterende skole op die skole se skoolkultuur,het en hoe sommige onderwysers teenoor so ‘n klassifikasie reageer. Met hierdie studie wil ek ’n interpreterende ondersoek loods na die vraag: “Hoe beleef onderwysers hul skoolkultuur nadat hul skole deur die Wes-Kaapse Onderwys Departement as onderpresterende skole klassifiseer is. Ek beskou dit as ’n belangrike vraag vir ondersoek omdat die literatuur rakende skoolkultuur en skool prestasie daarop dui dat hierdie twee aspekte as kritieke elemente beskou word in die skoolopset. Om hierdie rede ondersoek ek hierdie verskynsel in my onmiddelike skool omgewing om begrip te toon vir die wedersydse invloed wat hierdie elemente op mekaar het. Hierdie vraag word beredeneer teen die agtergrond van Suid-Afrika se deelname aan toetse van die ligame van internasionale akademiese prestasies en die onbevredigende uitlae wat tydens die deelname aan hierdie toetse verwerf is. Vanuit nege en dertig deelnemende lande het Suid -Afrika laaste geëindig. Ek loods my studie vanuit ’n kwalitatiewe interpreterende ondersoek aan drie laerskole en nege geselekteerde opvoeders oor die prestasie wat die Intermediëre Fase (graad ses) verwerf het in die aanname en inwerkingstelling van die Sistemiese Evalueringstoetse vanaf 2007 tot 2010 in Geletterdheid en Wiskunde as ’n uitvloeisel van die Nasionale Assesserings Beleid van 1998. Ek doen ’n beleidsanalise voortspruitend uit ’n historiese oorsig en konteks van skool en prestasie verskille wat in die onderwysopset aangetref word. My fokus is egter op die onderwysers se respons as gevolg van die klassifikasie van hul skool as ’n onderpresterende skool. Hierdie ondersoek word ingestel deur gebruik te maak van semi gestruktureerde onderhoudvoering met respondente van drie steekproefskole en ’n vergelyking van sistemiese toets uitslae en interne evaluerings uitslae. Vanuit die verkennende analises en die literatuur is gevind dat skoolkultuur ’n deurslaggewende bepaler in terme van leerderprestasie is. Waar skoolkultuur in presterende skole positief bydra tot die prestasie en werklewering van die skool, is dit ’n negatiewe determinant by die onderpresterende skole. Dit volgens Fleisch dui daarop dat die Suid- Afrikaanse onderwysopset nog steeds in twee afdelings fungeer naamlik die presterende voorheen bevoordeelde skole en aan die anderkant die onderpresterende voorheen benadeelde skole. Die onderwysers het ook gevoel dat hierdie aspek buite rekening is gelaat met die implementering van die sistemiese toetse en die gevolglike klassifikasie van die skole. Tydens die uitvoering van die studie het ek gevind dat die respondente van die deelnemende skole saamgestem dat ’n positiewe skoolkultuur leerderprestasie positief kan beïnvloed. Hulle het erken dat hulle in gebreke gebly het om ‘n positiewe skoolkultuur te ontwikkel en te handhaaf. Ek eksploreer die respondente se uitleef van hul skoolkultuur, magsverhoudinge en konseptualisering van hul identiteit aan die hand van hul gegewe klassifikasie. In die ondersoek het ek bevind dat daar ’n negatiewe skoolkultuur heers by skole wat as onderpresterende skole geklassifiseer is. Hierdie negatiewe skoolkultuur het ook veroorsaak dat onderwysers ’n probleem ondervind het met die magsverhouding wat daar bestaan het tussen hulle en die Onderwys Department. Hulle het dit gesien as ’n “top down” verhouding waarin hulle geen inspraak het nie. ’n Verdere uitspruitsel uit die negatiewe klassifikasie van die skool het daartoe gelei dat die onderwysers ’n negatiewe siening van hul identiteit as onderwysers ontwikkel het. Vanuit die literatuur wat handel oor die herstel van onderpresterende skole, stel ek die moontlikheid van die toepassing van transformasionele leierskap wat geimplementeer kan word in die bestuur van die deelnemenende skole as een van die strategieë om vanuit hul klassifikasie van onderprestering te kom. Hierdie navorsing het ten doel om die onderwysers se belewenis van hul skoolkultuur te weergee nadat hul skole geklassfiseer is as onderpresterend as gevolg van beleidstoepassing deur die Wes – Kaapse Onderwys Departement. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The interpretation and application of policy in the workplace will always be a contentious issue, because policy is not a closed entity but is open to different interpretations by its users. This contentiousness of policy is clearly illustrated with the application of the National Assessment Policy of 1998 on the education community of South – Africa. Along these lines my study will try to address the question: “How do teachers in underperforming schools give meaning to their school culture after their schools have been classified as underperforming schools by the Western Cape Education Department?” I see it as a very important question as it explores the interrelationships between school culture and school performance. These two elements are regarded as critical elements that can either create a positive or a negative school environment. And in that sense I want to have an understanding of its influence in my immediate school environment. This question is being argued against the backdrop of South - Africa’s participation in the tests of international bodies of academic performance where the country performed poorly. From thirty nine participating countries, South Africa achieved the lowest mean test score. My study is piloted in a qualitative interpretive enquiry at three different primary schools and nine pre- selected teachers in connection with the results obtained from the systemic evaluation tests which was administered in the intermediate phase (grade six) from 2007 up to 2010 in the learning areas Literacy and Numeracy. The Systemic Evaluation Tests stems from the National Assessment Policy of 1998 and was conducted as a measure to ensure the success of the learning centers and to improve learning systems. In this study I am conducting an analysis of education policy and also giving a historical overview of educational differences of schooling in South Africa. The focus however is on the teachers’ response as a result of their schools’’ being classified as underperforming schools. I am employing semi - structured interviews and do a comparison of the systemic results and the results obtained from the continuous assessment of the different schools. From the analyses and a study of the literature I found that school culture plays a defining role in learner performance. I also found that school culture can act as a positive enhancer in performing schools and can also act as a deterrent in underperforming schools. The results obtained from the systemic evaluation also shows that the South African education system still comprises of two separate education systems according to Fleisch. He holds the notion that there are the performing previously advantaged schools and the underperforming previously disadvantaged schools. The teachers felt that no consideration was given to the impact that the negative school culture and the impact of the environment could bear on the performances of the learners from the underperforming schools. My respondents acknowledged that a positive school culture could enhance learner performances and also conceded that they neglected to build and maintain a positive school culture. I then explore how my respondents gave meaning to their school culture, conceptualize power relations and identity formation after being classified as underperforming schools. In my study I found that there is a negative culture present in the underperforming schools. And it negatively influences the conceptualization of the teachers of the power relationship between them and the Education Department. They see the power relation as “top down” and something in which they have no say in. Due to the negative relationship between the teachers and the Education Department, the teachers also experiencing difficulties in dealing with their own identity as they view themselves as underperforming teachers as a result of the classification of their schools. Dealing with the literature regarding the rehabilitation of underperforming schools, I explore the possibility of employing Transformational Leadership as a strategy to deconstruct their image of underperformance. This research aims to show how teachers give meaning to their school culture after their schools were classified as underperforming due to policy applications by the Western Cape Education Department.
18

The African philosophical concept of Ubuntu as applied to the Emotional Intelligence of adolescents : challenging the appropriateness of Western-derived concepts

Mankowitz, Debra J. 11 1900 (has links)
The study assessed the Emotional Intelligence/Ubuntu understanding in sixteen learners aged 11-14 from both the Low SES and High SES levels, which includes the peri- urban/disadvantaged/informal settlements and the urban/privileged areas. The research motivated towards the conception that an inclusive Eurocentric and African approach towards education could benefit South African adolescent learners emotionally, socially and academically. Notwithstanding, providing an Emotional Intelligence framework that includes tenets of the African Philosophical paradigm of Ubuntu could enable adolescent learners to feel more empowered when confronting their socio- economic challenges. Hence, the purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the lack of formal EI/Ubuntu skills training in schools leaves learners without the competences to surmount the many challenges adolescents face during the turbulent phase of early adolescence. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of EI in a sample of adolescents from both SES levels. Qualitative methods were used in order to ascertain the impact of Western and Ubuntu epistemologies/worldviews on the adolescent learners’ Emotional Intelligence. This study also sought to determine the impact of education and role models on this sample of adolescent learners' EI/Ubuntu levels. This research also investigated how the merged EI/Ubuntu concepts can be incorporated into a life skills programme aimed at enhancing EI/Ubuntu in South African adolescent learners. In this study both quantitative and qualitative data were collected using the convergent parallel mixed method study and the paradigms that informed the study includes pragmatism, interpretivism, positivism and post-positivism. The objectives of this study includes identifying the emotional needs and EI status of adolescent learners and to investigate to what extent these are being met in the current educational system in South Africa. The research noted the contextual factors that influence EI in adolescent learners. The research explored how adolescents align their behaviour with the values and virtues of EI and Ubuntu. The following tools were used to accomplish the aforementioned objectives; a short introduction to Ubuntu, the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire - Adolescent Short Form (TEIQue-ASF) questionnaire was utilised to obtain a measure of the individual learner’s EI. A biographical questionnaire was given to all learners in order to establish what contextual factors impact on EI/Ubuntu consciousness. An Ubuntu style 10-item questionnaire to obtain insight into individual learners’ conceptualisation of EI. A short paragraph of approximately 300 words allowed for the narrative of each learner to be explored and a 22-item semi-structured parent/teacher interview from both SES groups. Role-playing scenarios were enacted to assess the depth of EI through the identification and understanding that took place between the players and draw a person diagrams (DAP) were utilised and assessed for EI aspects such as self-esteem, levels of confidence and awareness of self. The most pertinent aspects that were revealed by this study was that Low SES learners, especially those that lived in corrugated housing felt a sense of helplessness, fear and social alienation when challenged by their extreme living conditions. The study also revealed that the High SES group struggled at forming meaningful relationships and felt panicked and stressed regarding their academic responsibilities and outcomes. Hence as both groups struggled socially, they relied on technology and Western materialism to fill the void. / Psychology / M.A. (Psychology)
19

The professional development of educators as a key factor in the promotion of culture of learning in Johannesburg South district schools

Tshisikule, Mbulahiseni Joseph 12 1900 (has links)
The study deals with the professional development of educators as a key factor in the promotion of the culture of learning in Johannesburg South District. The aim was to determine the impact of professional development workshops in Johannesburg South district schools. A literature review was used to establish what other scholars say about the concept of professional development. Thereafter, a qualitative study was conducted. Data was gathered during interviews, based on pre-planned interview questions. Ten experienced participants were selected by using purposive sampling and asked about their perceptions and experience of professional development in the Johannesburg South District. The recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed to explore educators’ insights about professional development in the district. Findings indicate that educators wish to be rewarded with certificates of attendance or monetary incentives after attending professional development workshops presented by knowledgeable facilitators, and they also wish to collaborate with teachers from other districts. / Educational Leadership and Management / M. Ed. (Education Management)
20

The role of cultural diversity on social wellness in a primary school in Gauteng

Nkomo, Annah Ndlovu 04 1900 (has links)
This study investigates the role of cultural diversity on social wellness in a diverse school setting. It explores the views of learners and teachers on issues pertaining to cultural diversity and social wellness in the school. An integrative lens encompassing Hettler’s (1970) wellness theory and Letseka’s (2000) Ubuntu principle were used as the framework to guide the study. The interpretivist paradigm was used because the research method for this study is qualitative in nature. Purposive sampling was used in this study where fifteen participants were selected. The approach used is a case study, with the case being a multicultural primary school in Gauteng Province, South Africa. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Unisa’s Ethics Committee. Furthermore, permission was granted by the Department of Basic Education and the school’s principal. All participants signed consent and assent letters before data were collected. Learner participants gave their assent to take part in the study after consent had been obtained from their parents and guardians prior to the commencement of data collection. Data collected reflected the participants’ understanding of the need and means to promote social wellness within a culturally diverse school setting. It also suggests that it is possible to make diversity work for, instead of against us as is advocated for by Sheets (2005). The themes that emerged from collected data were: knowing one another as well as each other’s cultures, respect for equality and human dignity, loving kindness and compassion towards everyone, practicing good manners and discipline towards everyone, positive social interaction/desired attitude and also leading by example. These themes form guidelines that can be used in promoting social wellness in the school. / Inclusive Education / M. Ed. (Inclusive Education)

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