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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Prediction of silage nutritive value from chemical composition and in vitro fermentation analyses.

Larsen, Randolph Edward. January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
2

Digestibility and intake of corn, oat and sorghum silages

Foss, Donald Cushing, January 1961 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1961. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 34-39).
3

A comparison of various laboratory techniques for predicting silage digestibility

Simkins, Karl LeRoy, January 1962 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1962. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 43-46).
4

Effect of grass maturity and wilting on the nitrogen fractions in silage, their rate and extent of degradation in the rumen

Makoni, Nathaniel Fungayi January 1988 (has links)
The available literature indicates that, silages containing more undegraded protein will be better feeds for high levels of production from ruminants. Ensiling excessively wet herbage will increase degradation of both protein and energy. Ensiling wilted herbage will increase aerobic losses initially, during compaction and later, during removal which decreases digestibility. This study was carried out, to evaluate the effect of grass/legume maturity and wilting on the nitrogen fractions in silage, their rate and extent of degradation in the rumen and to determine the availability of undegraded silage protein and microbial protein to the animal. At the beginning of this study, laboratory assessment of the nutritional composition of both grass/legume parent material, and their ensiled products was carried out. The results for both parent herbage and silage were then compared on DM basis. While, silage crude protein (CP) (p<0.05), water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) (p<0.001), ash (p<0.001), acid detergent fibre (ADF) (p<0.05), and grass/legume ammonia-N (NH₃N) (p<0.001), were significantly increased by wilting, silage hot water insoluble nitrogen (HWIN) was significantly reduced (p<0.001). Significantly lower pH (p<0.05), NH₃N (p<0.05), and ash (p<0.01) contents were observed in mature silage. The composition of silage nutrients was found to be governed by that of the standing crop, at the time of cutting and by modifications which take place during wilting and ensiling. Although, wilting increased WSC content, it had the undesirable effect of reducing silage hot water insoluble nitrogen. Maturity had desirable effects of reducing volatile NH₃N and silage pH. The fermented herbage contained lower levels of nutrients than the parent material. In the second part of this study, the nylon bag technique was used to determine the rate and extent of protein degradation (in the rumen) of immature unwilted and wilted, mature unwilted and wilted silages. Estimates of effective protein degradation as a function of rumen outflow rate and degradation rate were also evaluated. The study showed that wilting and maturity significantly reduced (p<0.05) the soluble nitrogen fraction of the grass/legume silage. DM disappearance was significantly reduced (p<0.05) by wilting. The insoluble protein fraction was increased (p<0.05) in the mature silages. At an estimated rumen outflow rate of 0.02%, effective DM and CP degradation were significantly reduced (p<0.05) by wilting. From these findings, it is likely that supplementation of both protein and energy is required most for the unwilted and immature silages. Also, when silages are wilted more undegraded protein leaves the rumen compared with unwilted silage. In the final part of the study, the effect of wilting and maturity on rumen degradation of silage N fractions were estimated using four rumen and duodenal cannulated steers and heifers fed on grass/legume silage, at maintenance level. Solute, particulate, and RNA markers were used to determine digesta flow rate and microbial N respectively. Measurements of digestibility of DM, CP and ADF, proportions of duodenal bacterial N, amount of undegraded protein entering the duodenum, degradability of silage protein, rumen NH₃N and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) were made. This showed that, there were no significant differences (p<0.05) in PUN and rumen NH₃N among silages. Significant increases (p<0.05) in duodenal and fecal CP and reduced (p<0.01) fecal ADF were observed in animals given wilted silages. The degradability and digestibility results were much lower than expected and no apparent differences (p<0.05) were observed among silages. / Land and Food Systems, Faculty of / Graduate
5

Prediction of silage nutritive value from chemical composition and in vitro fermentation analyses.

Larsen, Randolph Edward. January 1972 (has links)
No description available.
6

Gärqualität und Schimmelpilzwachstum in Silagen in Abhängigkeit von Lagerungsdichte und äusserem Luftabschluss

Schmerbauch, Klaus-Josef. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Berlin, Humboldt-Universiẗat, Diss., 2000.
7

Effect of stage of maturity on nutritional value of pearl millet harvested as silage or hay

Axe, Dirk E January 2011 (has links)
Photocopy of typescript. / Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
8

Nutrient composition of ensiled alfalfa and corn forages grown in Virginia /

Ahmad, Muhammad Rashid, January 1991 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1991. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 132-141). Also available via the Internet.
9

The production of silage in small containers for small farmers

Letsoalo, Mokgatsana Lerato Victoria January 2014 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc. (Pasture Science)) --University of Limpopo, 2014 / The Limpopo Province is a well known for its warm summers and dry winters. The lack of rainfall in winter causes a shortage of feed for livestock and is responsible for poor animal production and even mortality. Alternatives winter feeding strategies that have been suggested by researchers are planted pastures, crop residues, hay, foggage and silage. Silage in “small container” is the cheapest potential alternative fodder source. This preliminary study investigated the use of small container silage during winter on small scale farms by using Panicum maximum, maize, pearl millet and forage sorghum. Dewageningsdrift (Hygrotech Experimental Farm, Gauteng) was used for this research project. The treatments were four crops (Maize, forage sorghum, pearl millet and Panicum maximum) ensiled in three ensiling techniques (small plastic bags, black plastic bags and buckets). During the first season (2009/2010) the samples were collected in a maturity stage. During second season (2010/2011) the samples were collected in different growing stages (soft dough, hard dough and matured stage). If all quality norms are taken into consideration maize can still be classified as a good silage crop. Silage of similar quality can be produced from forage sorghum and pearl millet. Pearl millet produced relative good quality silage when ensiled in a mature stage. Ensiling in small plastic bags and buckets resulted in good quality silage. There was a trend that buckets resulted in better quality silage when harvested in the hard dough stage. Black refuge plastic bags are not suggested for silage making. Although the quality is lower, silage can be produced from hard dough and mature material, especially with pearl millet in buckets.
10

LIQUID WHEY AS A MEDIA FOR SILAGE FORMATION WITH POOR QUALITY ROUGHAGES.

Villegas Gutierrez, Cesar Ignacio. January 1984 (has links)
No description available.

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