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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Measuring acceptance of immigrant groups in the U.S. the importance of the semantic differential scale in conjunction with the social distance scale /

Koleser, Jennifer M., January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Rutgers University, 2009. / "Graduate Program in Global Affairs." Includes bibliographical references (p.192-194).
42

Responding to membership in a disadvantaged group : from acceptance to collective protest

Wright, Stephen C. January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
43

The need for approval : a psychological study of the influence of Confucian values on the social behaviour of East Asians

Stephen Kin Kwok Cheng January 1997 (has links)
This thesis begins with a critical overview of crosscultural psychology and a re-examination of the concepts of emic and etic. It argues that the time has come for cross-cultural psychology to free itself from the moorings of its Western, universalistic paradigm and take non- Western, indigenous psychology seriously, especially that of East Asia. To address the need for an East Asian psychology, the thesis presents an empirical study on the psychological influence of Confucianism on East Asians. It hypothesises that the Confucian values of filiality, propriety and harmony induce a strong need for approval and a range of approval-seeking behaviours in the individual. In contrast, the Western values of individuation, autonomy and conflict induce a strong need for independence and a range of independence-seeking behaviours. To test this hypothesis, a 26-item, 5-point Likert scale was developed and'administered to 1625 university students across East Asia, which include East Asian samples from China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan, as well as Caucasian samples from Australia, United Kingdom and the United States. The study has confirmed its hypothesis that the Confucian values of filiality, propriety and harmony characterise the approval-driven social behaviours of East Asians and that the values of individuation, autonomy and conflict characterise the independence-driven social behaviours of Westerners. However, it has also found that, contrary to many long-held assumptions, there are significant differences in the way Confucian values have exerted their respective influence on the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans and other East Asians. The findings suggest not only that the culturally induced need for approval can be used as an overarching construct for the psychological study of East Asians from an indigenous perspective, but also that the innovative model used in this study can be applied to the study of other indigenous psychologies as well. More significantly, the study has found that, in contrast to the need for divine approval which has motivated the achievements of European Protestants in the past, the need for human approval is what characterises the achievement motivation and behaviours of Confucian East Asians today.
44

The need for approval : a psychological study of the influence of Confucian values on the social behaviour of East Asians /

Cheng, Stephen Kin Kwok. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Murdoch University, 1997. / Thesis submitted to the Division of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 305-313).
45

The need for peer approval : moderating factors between the internalization of the thin ideal and body image dissatisfaction /

Kehoe, Patricia, January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2002. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 67-80).
46

The effects of causal beliefs on the stigmatization of obesity

Bannon, Katie. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Rutgers University, 2008. / "Graduate Program in Psychology." Includes bibliographical references (p. 41-44).
47

Relationship between body image and social acceptance of sixth and eighth grade males and females

Russell, Rebecca. January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis, PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references.
48

Bounded set trends and conformity to group norms at a non-denominational church

Durham, Jennifer M. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (D. Min.)--Ashland Theological Seminary, 2005. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 146-151).
49

Perceptions of social acceptance and peer and romantic relationship self-efficacy as pediatric cancer survivors approach adulthood

Foster, Rebecca Hope, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Commonwealth University, 2010. / Prepared for: Dept. of Psychology. Title from title-page of electronic thesis. Bibliography: leaves 141-160.
50

PUBLIC ATTITUDE TOWARDS WIND POWER IN A DEVELOPED AND A DEVELOPING WIND MARKET – CASE STUDY OF SPAIN AND POLAND

Gulatowski-Henk, Marcin January 2017 (has links)
Wind power is currently one of the main sources of renewable energy worldwide. However, despite its numerous advantages, the deployment of wind turbines is not free from encounters with resistance from the society. This report reviews the principal aspects of the public attitude towards wind power. The research aims to define similarities and differences in attitude between residents of a developed and a developing wind market in Europe, Spain and Poland, respectively. A survey reveals that responses from both groups are similar in terms of the strategies employed by wind developers. The highest discordance is found within aspects of wind technology, such as the aesthetics of wind turbines and the perceived cost of wind power.

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