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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

How to Help Unpopular Second-Grade Pupils Become Acceptable to the Group

Lunday, Villa Hollingsworth 08 1900 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to determine the practicality of the theory that the teacher's highest function is to help each pupil to develop an agreeable, liberated, concordant, dynamic personality. In other words, the writer was interested in finding out whether it is possible, as far as can be determined, to develop an unpopular child to such an extent that he will be more social, more likable, and, in the end, more acceptable by his school group.
12

Some Factors Influencing Social Acceptance Among School Children

Jones, Francis L. 06 1900 (has links)
The study examines social acceptance factors among elementary school-aged children.
13

Peer acceptance and teacher preference toward children with voice problems

Lee, Ka-ying, 李嘉盈 January 2014 (has links)
Listeners’ perceptions toward children with communication disorders as well as the interpersonal experience of these children have been studied extensively by speech and language field and psychology field in the western countries. However, little is known about peers’ attitudes and social acceptance toward children with voice problems in the Chinese population. The current study examined the attitudes of peers and teachers toward children with different severity levels of voice problems; and evaluated how such attitudes could impact on the social acceptance of these children. Specifically, peer acceptance and teacher preference were investigated. Eighteen speakers (nine children with voice problems and nine vocally healthy children as controls) and 60 listeners (30 children and 30 teachers) participated in the study. Listeners were asked to provide attitude and acceptance ratings after listening to the voice samples of the speakers. For both groups of listeners, children with dysphonic voices were given significantly lower scores (i.e., less favorable) than children with normal voices in all the attitude ratings and acceptance ratings (both groups ps < .001). Moreover, the more severe the voice problems, the less positive the attitude and acceptance ratings the speakers received from the listeners. The attitude ratings and acceptance ratings made by the children listeners and teacher listeners did not differ significantly from each other (ps > .05). The results suggested that children with dysphonic voices were not only perceived less favorably on all attitude ratings than children with normal voices. They were also less socially accepted by peers and teachers. These findings provided valuable information and insights to the parents, educators, and speech-language pathologists on the potential impacts of pediatric voice disorders on listeners’ perception and children’s interpersonal experience. / published_or_final_version / Speech and Hearing Sciences / Master / Master of Philosophy
14

Personality differences on need for approval for romantic relationships from social networks

Fellows, Jefferson. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (B.A.)--Haverford College, Dept. of Psychology, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references.
15

Exclusion and nonconscious behavioral mimicry the role of belongingness threat /

Lakin, Jessica Lynn, January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2003. / Title from first page of PDF file. Document formatted into pages; contains xii, 111 p.; also includes graphics Includes bibliographical references (p. 100-109). Available online via OhioLINK's ETD Center
16

The effects of music therapy on the appropriate social interactions of elementary-aged children with students who have special needs

May, Kelly Jo. Standley, Jayne M. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (M.M.) Florida State University, 2005. / Advisor: Jayne M. Standley, Florida State University, College of Music. Title and description from dissertation home page (viewed 7-9-07). Document formatted into pages; contains 54 pages. Includes biographical sketch. Includes bibliographical references.
17

Self and peer cognition in delinquent and nondelinquent males /

Bernstein, Robert Michael January 1979 (has links)
No description available.
18

A Comparative Sociometric Study of Social Acceptance

Roberts, John E. 08 1900 (has links)
This study is concerned with the extent that social acceptance for a person in one group remains the same for that person in another group, or the constancy of a person's role in different group situations.
19

SOCIAL APPROVAL AS EXHIBITED BY DEPRESSED PERSONS.

Pritchard, Barbara Ellen. January 1983 (has links)
No description available.
20

The impact of social acceptance and close friendships on peer and self perceptions of overt and relational aggression among adolescents

Gill, Jennie K. 30 March 2017 (has links)
Using longitudinal peer and self-report data (n = 1490; 10th to 12th grade), changes in relational and overt aggression were each regressed onto social acceptance, close friendships, and their interaction. Links between social acceptance, close friendships and overt or relational aggression were dependent upon whether adolescents or their peers assessed their friendships and aggression. For both genders, peers were more likely to see adolescents with many friends and close friendships as being more overtly and relationally aggressive. In contrast, self-reports of close friendship and social acceptance were either unrelated or negatively related to peer-reported overt and relational aggression. When predicting peer-reported overt aggression, self-reported close friendships and self-reported social acceptance interacted such that males who believed they had close friendships and were socially accepted were more likely to be rated by peers as overtly aggressive. No connections between friendship and aggression were found when adolescents rated their own overt aggression and friendship / Graduate

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